11/30/1962

UCCSN Board of Regents' Meeting Minutes
November 30, 1962








11-30-1962

Pages 322-340



UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA

BOARD OF REGENTS

November 30, 1962



The Board of Regents met in room 112, Grant Hall, Nevada Southern

Regional Division, Las Vegas, Friday, November 30, 1962. Pres-

ent: Regents Anderson, Boies, Elwell (morning session only),

Germain, Grant, Hug, Lombardi, Magee; Business Manager Humphrey,

Engineer Rogers, Vice President Young and President Armstrong.

Chief Deputy Attorney General Porter present as Legal Adviser.

Mr. Hancock, Secretary-Manager of the State Planning Board, was

present for items pertaining to the building program. By invi-

tation, Dr. Juanita White, Regent-Elect, Reporters Laxalt, Drom-

iak and Tom White covered the meeting for the Press.



The meeting was called to order at 9:15 A.M. by Chairman Grant.



1. Minutes of Previous Meeting



Upon motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mrs. Magee, the

minutes of the meeting of October 6, 1962, were approved.



2. Check Registers



President Armstrong recommended approval of the attached

Check Registers, as submitted by Mr. Humphrey.



Motion by Mr. Elwell, seconded by Mr. Germain, carried

unanimously by roll call vote that the Check Registers be

approved.



3. News Reporters



Mr. Germain asked that the record show that he is very

critical of the fact that when the Regents meet in Las

Vegas, the reporters do not take the time and trouble to

cover the meetings. Mr. Grant added that when the meetings

are held in Reno, the reporters attend and give ample cover-

age, but that this is not the case in Las Vegas.



4. Study of the Office of the Business Manager



Copies of "University of Nevada Survey: Office of the

Business Manager", by Dr. Clarence Scheps had been previous-

ly mailed to the Regents for study and consideration prior

to the meeting. As previously authorized by the Board, Dr.

Scheps, Vice President and Comptroller of Tulane University,

was invited to study and review the Office of the Business

Manager of the University of Nevada and to make recommenda-

tions for the improvement of the entire Office and its

functions. President Armstrong recommended that the report

be received officially and that Mr. Humphrey be asked for

recommendations concerning each of the detailed suggestions

in the report for consideration at the next meeting of the

Board, including an estimate of the time and money necessary

to implement the recommendations.



5. Bid Openings



President Armstrong presented the following items:



a) Jot Travis Addition



This item was presented for report only, since the bid

opening was conducted by the State Planning Board. The

low bid was by Frank Capriotti for $474,085 and by ac-

cepting the additive alternates to re-roof the old part

of the building, to complete finishing of the Bookstore

area, and furnishing and installation of transformers

and switching gear for the electrical system, the amount

of the bid would be $490,443. The architect's estimate

for the work was $527,000.



b) Concrete Slab, Temporary Building "C"



A meeting to open bids was held in room 108, Clark

building, at 2:00 P.M., on Thursday, October 25, 1962.

Present were Assistant Business Manager Hattori, Assist-

ant Engineer Whalen, and members of bidding firms. Bid

notice had duly appeared in local papers for CONCRETE

SLAB - SOUTH END, TEMPORARY BUILDING "C".



Bids were received and opened by Mr. Hattori as follows:



A-Dee Construction Accompanied by bid bond $ 798



Pagni Bros. Accompanied by bid bond 1,400



I. Christiansen Accompanied by check 1,015



It is recommended that the bid of A-Dee Construction in

the amount of $798 be accepted, and a contract be drawn

to accomplish this work. This bid is within the esti-

mate prepared by the University Engineer's Office and

funds are available in the Buildings and Grounds Budget,

Account Number 01-9010-39.



Respectfully submitted,



/s/ James D. Rogers

University Engineer



Approved:

/s/ Neil D. Humphrey, Business Manager

/s/ Charles J. Armstrong, President



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried

unanimously by roll call vote that the acceptance of

the bid and the awarding of the contract be approved.



c) A Gravity Flow Concrete Pipe Irrigation System



A meeting to open bids was held in room 108, Clark

Administration building at 2:00 P.M. on Tuesday,

October 30, 1962. Present were Assistant Business

Manager Hattori, Assistant University Engineer Whalen

and Superintendent Goodale and members of the bidding

firms. Bid notice had appeared in local papers for

the construction of A GRAVITY FLOW CONCRETE PIPE IRRI-

GATION SYSTEM at the Dairy Farm, Main Station Farm.



Bids were received and opened by Mr. Hattori as follows:



Base Bid Alternate

George Grifall -

Accompanied by bond, 5% $16,280 $4,950



Wiechmann Engineers -

Accompanied by bond, 5% 11,950 1,782



Robert L. Helms -

Accompanied by bond, 5% 14,900 2,300



Isbell Construction Co. -

Accompanied by bond, 5% 9,800 2,600



It is recommended that the base bid of $9,800 and al-

ternate bid of $2,600 submitted by Isbell Construction

Co. be accepted, and a contract be drawn to accomplish

this work. This bid is within the estimate prepared

by the University Engineer's Office, and funds are

available in the Main Station Farm budget, Account Num-

ber 41-7055.



Respectfully submitted,



/s/ James D. Rogers

University Engineer



Approved:

/s/ Neil D. Humphrey, Business Manager

/s/ Charles J. Armstrong, President

/s/ J. E. Adams, Dean, College of Agriculture



Motion by Mr. Elwell, seconded by Mrs. Magee, carried

unanimously by roll call vote that the acceptance of

the bid and the awarding of the contract be approved.



d) Cabinets and Book Shelves, Clark Building



A meeting to open bids was held in room 108, Clark Ad-

ministration building at 2:00 P.M. on Wednesday, Novem-

ber 7, 1962. Present were Assistant Business Manager

Hattori, Assistant University Engineer Whalen and mem-

bers of the bidding firms. Bid notice had appeared in

local papers for CONSTRUCTION AND INSTALLATION OF CAB-

INETS AND BOOK SHELVES, CLARK BUILDING.



Bids were received and opened by Mr. Hattori as follows:



Builders Mill Accompanied by check $3,193.96



Pagni Bros. Accompanied by bid bond 3,445.00



Frank Capriotti Accompanied by bid bond 3,319.00



It is recommended that the bid of Builders Mill in the

amount of $3,193.96 be accepted and a contract drawn to

accomplish this work. This bid is in line with the es-

timate prepared by the University Engineer's Office and

the funds are available in the Buildings and Grounds

Budget, Account Number 01-9010-39.



Respectfully submitted,



/s/ James D. Rogers

University Engineer



Approved:

/s/ Neil D. Humphrey, Business Manager

/s/ Charles J. Armstrong, President



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Boies, carried

unanimously by roll call vote that the acceptance of

the bid and the awarding of the contract be approved.



e) Telephone System, Las Vegas Campus



A meeting to open bids was held in the Office of Dean

William Carlson, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Campus

at 2:00 P.M. on Wednesday, November 7, 1962. Present

were Dean Carlson and Mrs. Nell Carpenter of the bidding

firm. Bid notice had appeared in the Las Vegas papers

for CHANGES AND ADDITIONS TO THE TELEPHONE SYSTEM, LAS

VEGAS CAMPUS.



Bid was received and opened by Dean Carlson as follows:



Las Vegas Electric Co.,

Las Vegas, Nevada

Accompanied by cashiers check $1,450



It is recommended that the bid of Las Vegas Electric Co.

in the amount of $1,450 be accepted, and a contract be

drawn to accomplish this work. This bid is within the

estimate prepared by the University Engineer's Office

and funds are available in the Buildings and Grounds

Budget, Account Number 01-9050-39.



Respectfully submitted,



/s/ James D. Rogers

University Engineer



Approved:

/s/ Neil D. Humphrey, Business Manager

/s/ Charles J. Armstrong, President



Motion by Mr. Germain, seconded by Dr. Lombardi, carried

unanimously, by roll call vote that the acceptance of

the bid and the awarding of the contract be approved.



6. Silas E. Ross



Mr. Ross, who was in Las Vegas for the cornerstone ceremony,

visited the meeting and was introduced by Chairman Grant.

Mr. Ross read the following "Proceedings" of the cornerstone

ceremony for Morrill Hall. He also read the list of items

contained in the cornerstone and offered to have copies made

for the Board.



Motion by Mr. Germain, seconded by Dr. Anderson, carried

unanimously that Mr. Ross be thanked for the copy of the

"Proceedings" (below), for the appearance before the Board

of Regents, and for the list of cornerstone items, which

Mr. Ross offered to supply.



PROCEEDINGS

of the

M. W. Grand Lodge

of

FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS

of the

STATE OF NEVADA

at a

Special Grand Communication, September 12th, A. L. 5885



Postscriptum -- After the Special Communication had been

formally closed, the Grand Lodge, upon invitation of the

citizens of Reno, repaired to ye hostelrie of Brother

CHAMBERLAIN where a sumptuous dinner was served. When the

viands had been discussed, the Board of Regents, by Colonel

H. G. Shaw, Chairman, presented M. W. Grand Master MURPHY

with an elegant silver trowel as a memorial of the day.

The speeches of presentation and response, as well as the

post prandial remarks of other Brethren, were most felici-

tous, but are, unfortunately, out of the reach of this

reporter.



J. D. H.



7. Building Program



a) Mr. Rogers presented and discussed the Capital Improve-

ment Program for the biennium 1963-65, as approved by

the State Planning Board, as follows:



Reno Campus, 63-64



1A Physical Education Facility, Phase I

Design & Construction $ 695,724

Planning Board Staff Recommendation (1) 701,260

Planning Board Recommendation (1) 701,200



1A Equipment, Engineering-Mines

Purchase $ 175,000

Planning Board Staff Recommendation (2) 125,000

Planning Board Recommendation (2) 125,000



1A Physical Science Building

Construction $3,047,000

Planning Board Staff Recommendation (3) 1,066,642

Planning Board Recommendation (3) 1,066,642

Planning Board Staff Recommendation *(5) 1,583,858

Planning Board Recommendation *(5) 1,583,858



2 Land

Purchase $ 200,000

Planning Board Staff Recommendation (5) 200,000

Planning Board Recommendation (5) 200,000



3 Utilities

Design & Construction $ 30,000

Planning Board Staff Recommendation**(4) 30,000

Planning Board Recommendation **(4) 30,000



4 Walks and Landscaping

Design & Construction $ 30,000

Planning Board Staff Recommendation None

Planning Board Recommendation None



Reno Campus, 64-65



1 Church Property

Purchase $ 211,095

Planning Board Staff Recommendation (5) 212,500

Planning Board Recommendation (5) 212,500



2 Administration Building

Design $ 30,000

Planning Board Staff Recommendation (5) 4,000

Planning Board Recommendation (5) 4,000



3 Physical Education & Military Facility, Phase 2

Design $ 157,000

Planning Board Staff Recommendation None

Planning Board Recommendation None



4 Corporation Yard

Design $ 13,750

Planning Board Staff Recommendation (5)AP 5,000

Planning Board Recommendation (5)AP 5,000



5 Utilities

Design & Construction $ 30,000

Planning Board Staff Recommendation (4) 30,000

Planning Board Recommendation (4) 30,000



6 Remodel Mackay Science

Design $ 19,200

Planning Board Staff Recommendation None

Planning Board Recommendation None



7 Remodel Morrill Hall

Advance Plan $ 5,000

Planning Board Staff Recommendation None

Planning Board Recommendation None



Las Vegas Campus, 63-64



1A Land

Purchase $ 200,000

Planning Board Staff Recommendation None

Planning Board Recommendation (5) 200,000



1A Fine Arts Complex

Construction $ 659,000

Planning Board Staff Recommendation (3) 659,000

Planning Board Recommendation (3) 659,000



1A Dormitory & Dining Facility

Design & Construction $ 855,000

Planning Board Staff Recommendation (3)RB 817,700

Planning Board Recommendation (3)RB 817,700



1A Dormitory & Dining Furnishings

Purchase $ 45,000

Planning Board Staff Recommendation None

Planning Board Recommendation (3) 45,000



2 Utilities

Design & Construction $ 100,000

Planning Board Staff Recommendation**(4) 100,000

Planning Board Recommendation **(4) 100,000



3 Walks, Landscaping, Physical Education

Fields & Courts and Advance Plan Physical

Education Facility

Advance Plan, Design & Construction $ 95,000

Planning Board Staff Recommendation None

Planning Board Recommendation None



Las Vegas Campus, 64-65



1 Utilities

Design & Construction $ 50,000

Planning Board Staff Recommendation None

Planning Board Recommendation None



2 Administration Building

Design $ 11,500

Planning Board Staff Recommendation (5)AP 4,000

Planning Board Recommendation (5)AP 4,000



3 Social Science Building

Design $ 52,500

Planning Board Staff Recommendation (5)AP 17,200

Planning Board Recommendation (5)AP 17,200



Requests $5,856,269

Revenue Bonds 855,000

Planning Board Staff Revenue Bonds 817,700

Planning Board Revenue Bonds 817,700

Planning Board Staff Priorities 1-4 2,711,902

Planning Board Priorities 1-4 2,756,842

Planning Board Staff Priority 5 2,026,558

Planning Board Priority 5 2,226,558



General Fund $2,597,125

General Obligation Bonds 2,898,182

----------

$5,495,307

Notes:



Priorities 1-4 are within the funds the Budget Director

states will be available for Capital Improvement.



Priority 5 if money can be made available.



* $500,000 will be requested 65-67 for furnishing and

equipment.



** Included in above items and Legislature to permit

use of any savings for this.



In the discussion which followed, Mr. Germain and Mr.

Grant urged Mr. Hancock to do everything possible to

secure Dormitory and Dining facilities for the Las

Vegas Campus, using whatever source of funds might be

found to be available.



The item on Church Property Purchase was especially dis-

cussed and Mr. Germain requested that the Board go on

record as requesting the Planning Board to give pref-

erence to this item if a choice has to be made between

it and the Land Purchase item of $2000,000. Mr. Hancock

agreed and indicated that the State Planning Board is of

the same opinion.



In further discussion, Dr. Anderson asked for architec-

tural conformity on the Campus, looking forward espe-

cially to the Social Sciences and the Physical Sciences

buildings. Mr. Hancock replied that the Planning Board

is in agreement and already working on this matter.



b) Dr. Anderson discussed parking and traffic problems on

North Virginia Street near Manzanita Hall and north of

the Fine Arts building. Cars coming out of the Campus

in those areas approach the street on rising ground

which makes it difficult to see oncoming cars when cars

are also parked on that side of the street.



Motion by Dr. Anderson, seconded by Mr. Elwell, carried

unanimously that the University request the City of Reno

or State Highway Department to eliminate parking along

North Virginia Street from Ninth Street to just beyond

the Weller property on the Campus side of the street.



c) Mr. Rogers read the following progress report as sub-

mitted by the State Planning Board:



1. Reno Campus



A. Funded Advance Planning and Design Projects:



1. Social Science Building - the architects,

Vhay, Ferrari & Widmer, have submitted pre-

liminary sketches to the University Engi-

neer for review.



2. Home Management Residence - the architect,

Edward S. Parsons, is studying the desira-

bility of locating this building to the

east of the Home Economics building in lieu

of placing it on top of that building.



3. Design Physical Science Building - satis-

factory negotiations have been completed

with Lockard & Casazza, and preliminary

study plans are being prepared.



4. Men's and Women's Dormitories - preliminary

discussions have been held with the archi-

tects, Selden & Stewart; however, negotia-

tions have been deferred as architects are

studying scope to determine if budget will

cover.



5. Advance Plan, Remodeling of Mackay Science

Building - the architectural firm of De

Longchamps, O'Brien & Wells has been sel-

ected for this work; however, no negotia-

tions have been conducted due to the lack

of a scope of work.



6. Advance Plan, College of Education Building

- the architectural firm of Ferris, Erskine

& Calef has been selected for this work;

however, no negotiations have been scheduled

pending receipt of a definitive scope of

work from the University of Nevada.



7. Master Plan, Reno Campus - Skidmore, Owings

& Merrill will submit the final working

draft of the general development plan on

November 28 for review and tentative ap-

proval in order that the base model be

prepared.



B. Funded Construction Projects:



1. Nobel Getchell Library - Notice of Comple-

tion was filed November 20, 1962.



2. Replace and Extend Heat Lines in Quadrangle

- Notice of Completion was filed November

20, 1962.



3. Engineering-Mines Building - work is pro-

gressing satisfactorily.



4. Women's Dormitory - work is progressing

satisfactorily.



5. Addition to Student Union Building - work

is progressing satisfactorily.



C. Miscellaneous Projects:



1. Acquisition of Weller Property - Mr. Weller

is considering a new offer based on the re-

appraisal. He will advise this Office of

his decision on December 3, 1962.



2. Acquisition of St. Albert's School Property

- the Option form has not yet been received.



2. University of Nevada, Nevada Southern



A. Funded Design Projects:



1. Fine Arts Building - preliminary study plans

are being completed by the Architect, James

B. Mc Daniel.



2. Outside Courts and Landscaping - contract

documents are being prepared for bid.



3. Master Plan - Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

will submit the final working draft of the

general development plan on November 28 for

review and tentative approval in order that

the base model may be prepared.



4. Sidewalks for the Library Building - the

architect has completed the final plans.



B. Funded Construction Projects:



1. All construction projects have been complet-

ed. The technical wood furniture for the

Library has been scheduled for delivery

December 15, 1962.



Mr. Rogers also stated that work was progressing satis-

factorily on the Life Science Wing project and on the

Atmospherium project.



Mr. Rogers discussed the site development plans for the Reno

Campus and the Las Vegas Campus. He suggested that the

Nursing building be omitted when the Reno Campus plan is ap-

proved and asked for approval of the plans so that the mod-

els can be made. He pointed out that the plan for the Las

Vegas Campus has already been approved.



Motion by Mr. Boies, seconded by Mrs. Magee, carried unani-

mously that the site development plans be approved.



Motion by Dr. Anderson, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried unani-

mously that the Board communicate with the State Planning

Board expressing concern over the particular item on the

budget covering purchase of the Catholic Church property,

and urging completion of that phase of planning for the

University.



In discussing the furnishing of Las Vegas Campus Library

building, Mr. Rogers pointed out that when bids for large

items of furnishings are let, there is no penalty clause in

the contract for non-compliance. Therefore when the firm

does not meet the delivery date, the University must choose

between agreeing to accept the items late or putting them

out for re-bid with the inconvenience of a delay in time.

Reference in this instance was to drapes for the President's

Office in Clark Administration building. The matter was

discussed and it was agreed informally to leave the solution

in the hands of Mr. Rogers and Mr. Hancock.



Mr. Rogers asked for a request from the Board for the exten-

sion of the fire alarm system in the area of Artemisia under

the Utilities Extension Project to be paid from general

funds, and for which Mr. Rogers had done the design. Mr.

Hancock explained that when general funds are designated for

utilities, without specifying which utilities, the Planning

Board wants approval for each item. When an appropriation

lists the items to be covered, separate approval is not nec-

essary. Discussion followed as to whether Administration or

Board approval should be sought, and the consensus was that

the Board should be asked for approval. President Armstrong

recommended approval of the request for the fire alarm ex-

tension.



Motion by Mr. Boies, seconded by Dr. Lombardi, carried

unanimously that the extension of the fire alarm system be

requested of the State Planning Board.



8. Fall-Out Shelters



Dr. Armstrong discussed the request of the Federal Govern-

ment for licenses which give permission to the Federal Gov-

ernment to enter and store materials in certain buildings

and to designate them as Fall-Out Shelters. This permis-

sion does not commit the University in any way but does

make it possible for the University to receive such mater-

ials. President Armstrong recommended approval.



Motion by Mr. Elwell, seconded by Mrs. Magee, carried

unanimously that the above arrangement with the Federal

Government be approved.



The meeting recessed at 11:50 for luncheon, and was called to

order at 1:35 P.M. by Chairman Grant.



9. HHFA Post-Sale Resolution



A Resolution Covering Sale of Revenue Bond Certificates as

per bid opening on October 6, 1962, had been prepared by

Dawson, Sherman, Nagel and Howard, and was here presented

for adoption by the Board. The Resolution, No. 62-6, was

read individually by the Regents in the meeting. Mr. Porter

advised that the Resolution had been reviewed by him and

that it is now ready for adoption, subject to amendment

regarding legal description of property and up-dating as to

change in personnel of the Board of Regents. President

Armstrong recommended approval.



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Germain, carried

unanimously by roll call vote that the Resolution be adopt-

ed as follows:



(Resolution No. 62-6 on pages 341-355)



10. Elko Trip



President Armstrong reported on the trip to Elko, Nevada

on November 10-11 to inspect the sites offered for a Junior

College as proposed by the Citizen's Committee of Elko and

the Elko Chamber of Commerce. Five sites were offered by

the City of Elko free of charge, three of which were not

considered desirable. More favored were some combination

of two City sites, or a site on the Chilton-Harris property.

A report prepared by Dr. Young and here presented by Dr.

Armstrong gave the following advantages and disadvantages

of the Chilton-Harris site and the two City sites, as

follows:



1. City sites A, B and E are not regarded as the most

desirable.



2. The Elko Colony Indian Reservation Land (not seen by

the staff survey team) is considered favorably by Dr.

Anderson; but there may be difficulty in acquiring this

property, and other Regents do not list it as their

first priority.



3. The sites most favorably considered are:



a. Some combination of City sites C and D (recommended

by the staff survey team).



b. A site on the Chilton-Harris property. (Of particu-

lar interest here is a site on a high plateau about

four miles out of town, favored by President Arm-

strong and several Regents. This specific site was

not seen by the staff survey team.)



4. Following is a quick analysis of the possible advantages

and disadvantages of the two major preferences:



a. Chilton-Harris site:



Advantages:



(1) Is far enough out so that it will not be touch-

ed or directly affected by proposed freeway.



(2) Is far enough out so that it would not be

affected if airport is enlarged.



(3) Is far enough out so that City will not grow

out to it for many years, thereby allowing ex-

pansion of land area with little difficulty.



(4) Offers beautiful view of the City and surround-

ing area, including Ruby mountains.



Disadvantages:



(1) Might be too far out for easy commuting.



(2) Would require paved road some distance from

the highway and/or down to Fifth Street.



(3) Entrance road would have to negotiate fairly

steep slope.



(4) Distance would prevent utilization of City

water or sewage facilities.



(5) There is no guarantee that the University can

obtain 100 acres free of charge at this site.



(6) There is a strong possibility that once this

land is placed in use the area around the site

would be built up, even though it was some

distance out of the City, thereby making later

expansion difficult.



b. City sites C and D:



Advantages:



(1) Area close to the City.



(2) The better part of the City (residences, chur-

ches, schools) is growing out in that direc-

tion.



(3) Would have no problems with roads, water, sew-

ers.



(4) Offer fairly nice view of the City and Ruby

mountains.



(5) Might become more valuable sooner in case it

had to be sold or exchanged for another site.



(6) City has offered any 100 acres free of charge.



Disadvantages:



(1) If City grew around area before the facility

was developed, there might be considerable

pressure and criticism.



(2) Proposed freeway might cut through this land.



(3) Unsightly Indian colony is nearby.



Mrs. Magee spoke of the acreage offered by Chilton-Harris.

In a talk with Mr. Harris, she learned that they would be

only too happy to make available any amount of acreage nec-

essary for an Institution of higher learning.



The recommendations of the Committee which visited Elko was

that the Chilton-Harris location, with no strings attached

as to time of development or retention of property if sale

or exchange proved desirable at a later date, be accepted.

Dr. Armstrong so recommended.



Motion by Mrs. Magee, seconded by Mr. Boies, carried unani-

mously that the offer of Chilton-Harris be accepted on the

above terms.



11. Knoll Creek Station



During the Elko visit, Regents Boies and Magee, and Dr.

Armstrong visited the University's Knoll Creek Station.

Mr. Boies reported that they found very poor housing facil-

ities, consisting of a converted quonset hut being used as

living quarters by the family of the man in charge. He

proposed that something be done to improve the quarters,

and stressed the great amount of good which is done for the

farmers by the Knoll Creek project. Dr. Armstrong spoke of

the poor condition of the quonset huts and the desire for

improvement, but believed that the land is leased, not own-

ed, by the University and therefore building on it might

present problems. The matter was generally discussed and

the Chair, with consent of the other members of the Board,

authorized Mr. Boies to open negotiations, in an advisory

capacity, with the owners of the land to determine the

status and find out what might be done; and further that

this authorization extend beyond the present term of Office

of Mr. Boies. It was Mr. Boies' opinion that if the land

is not University-owned, the owners, the Salmon River

Cattlemen's Association, would be willing to give some land

to the University.



12. Fraternity-Sorority Park



In accord with the request of the Board at the last meeting,

the Office of Student Affairs, in consultation with under-

graduate and alumni representatives of sororities and fra-

ternities, submitted a progress report, which was read and

discussed by Dr. Armstrong. Dr. Young discussed the report

also, saying that all the representatives of sororities and

fraternities and alumni groups approved the plan, some im-

mediately and some for the future, if needed. Mr. Porter

had studied the proposal and expressed his opinion that,

if the park is on land belonging to the University the same

supervision now given to Dormitories must be exercised over

the sororities and fraternities.



Motion by Mr. Hug, seconded by Mr. Germain, carried unani-

mously that the Office of Student Affairs continue to in-

vestigate the possibilities of a sorority-fraternity park,

considering both Campuses in their study.



13. Gifts



Gifts received by the University were presented by President

Armstrong with his recommendation for acceptance as follows:



Library Gifts, Reno Campus, from the following donors:



Dr. David Hettich, Department of English - 27 issues of

"College English".



Mrs. Weld Arnold, Carson City - 113 volumes.



Associated Students, University of Nevada - $400 from last

year's Senior Class and $166.71 from last year's Junior

Class for purchase of books.



Honorable Walter S. Baring, Washington, D. C. - 361 volumes

of "Yearbooks of the Department of Agriculture" and 157

copies of various reports.



California Electric Power Company, San Bernardino - $100 to

the James E. Church Fund.



Senator Howard W. Cannon, Washington, D. C. - copy of "Year-

book of Agriculture, 1962" and 47 pamphlets and periodicals.



Mrs. E. L. Cord, Reno - collection of approximately 150

recent issues of magazines.



Dr. E. J. Edmiston, Reno - $10 for purchase of books in

the field of Nuclear Engineering, in memory of Fred Allen

Fuller.



Mr. G. B. Mc Comb, St. Louis, Missouri - Volume VI of "A

Collection of Papers on Underground Pipeline Corrosion".



Mrs. Chester A. Paterson, Reno - three volumes and "Index

of Stork County", "Ohio Cemetery Inscriptions", and five

volumes of similar records of other States.



Mrs. Jerry Rogero, Reno - copy of "Warrum History of Utah"

and the "Gaskell's Compendum of Forms".



Mrs. Pearl Varnum, Reno - a songbook published in 1856,

owned by Alf Doten.



From the following donors, contributions to the "Weld Arnold

Memorial Fund":



Mr. David Heron, University of Nevada - $10

Dr. Duis Bolinger, Carson City - $10


Mr. and Mrs. Procter Hug., Jr., Reno - $10

Mrs. Hewitt C. Wells, Reno - $25

Miss Alice Terry, University of Nevada - $5

Major General J. F. Phillips, Mount Vernon, Virginia -

$50



Gifts for the annual Nevada Prize Examination in High School

Mathematics from the following donors:



Concrete Conduit Company, Sparks - $15

Edgerton, Germeshausen & Grier, Inc., Las Vegas - $50

First National Bank of Nevada, Reno - $50

Kennecott Copper Corporation, Mc Gill - $50

Nevada Bank of Commerce, Reno - $50

Sierra Pacific Power Company, Reno - $100

Stauffer Chemical Company, Henderson - $50

Security National Bank, Reno - $50

Bank of Nevada, Las Vegas - $25

Nevada Society of Professional Engineers - $25

Union Federal Savings and Loan Association, Reno - $50



Scholarships



Edgerton, Germeshausen & Grier, Inc., Las Vegas - $1500

covering scholarships - $1000 for the Reno Campus and $500

for the Las Vegas Campus.



Nevada State Nurses Association, District No. 1 - $250 for

a Nursing scholarship.



General Motors Corporation, Detroit, Michigan - $1250 to

cover four full-year General Motors scholarships.



Emporium of Music, Reno - $100 to cover their annual schol-

arship award.



Bruce R. Thompson, Reno - $100 to be credited to the R. C.

Thompson Scholarship Fund.



Department of Education, Carson City - $300 as a Standard

Oil Scholarship for Michael Gottschalk.



Delta Delta Delta, Chicago, Illinois - $300 to cover their

annual scholarship award.



Sales Executive Club of Southern Nevada, Las Vegas - $77 to

be applied to the scholarship fund for Lois Arends.



Shasta Union High School District and Junior College,

Redding, California - $250 to cover a scholarship for

Stanley Fields.



University Scholarship Foundation, Beverly Hills, Califor-

nia - $150 to cover a one-semester scholarship in the Art

Department.



New China Club - $500 as the first semester payment on

their scholarship.



The Leah Cashman Family, Las Vegas - $3000 as the first

two years' commitments on a scholarship to be established

as follows:



One thousand dollars the first year to be divided equal-

ly between two students, or five hundred dollars each;

two thousand dollars the second year which will make a

total of four scholarships in all and the amount of the

continuing scholarship fund.



In establishing the fund, request is made that the En-

gineering students be selected after completing one

year's study in the field and that they be selected on

the recommendation of the faculty of the College of

Engineering. We further request that a continuing

scholarship carry the faculty's annual endorsement.



The selection of a worthy recipient is to be made with-

out respect to religion, race, sex or marital status.

In placing this in the hands of the faculty of the

College of Engineering we feel that the funds will have

an opportunity of assisting those students most promis-

ing.



Miscellaneous Gifts from the following donors:



Western Electric Fund, San Leandro, California - $965 for

purchase of equipment in the Department of Electrical En-

gineering.



Donald Segerstrom, Sonora, California - complete file of

"The Advertiser", a newspaper published in Ione, Nevada

Territory, in the 1860's, valued at approximately $1000.



Reader's Digest Foundation, Pleasantville, New York - $400

for expenses of students engaged in certain news research

projects and in particular for travel for these projects.



Mrs. Frank R. Payne, Reno - $50 for the support of "The

Messiah".



The Pacific Pumping Company, Oakland, California - a jet

system pump for use in the Irrigation class and the Pump

Motors class.



Gifts to Nevada Southern Regional Division



Clark County Panhellenic Association - two water colors by

Mr. Cliff Segerbloom entitled "Lake Mead" and "Sunrise

Mountain".



Mr. G. I. Gribben, Assistant Branch Manager, Monore Calcu-

lating Machine Company, Las Vegas - $50 for purchase of

books in the field of Business Administration.



Service League of Las Vegas - $2000 for purchase of books.



Mr. and Mrs. George Rittenhouse, Las vegas - $8 as a contri-

bution to the Library in memory of William Mendelsohn.



American Association of University Women, Las Vegas Branch -

$10 to be used to purchase a book or books for the Nevada

Southern Regional Division Library, in memory of Judge L. O.

Hawkins.



For the Music Concert Series:



Dr. Chester Lockwood - $25

The University Store - $25

Dr. Jacobs S. Orleans - $10



From the following donors, contributions to the "Frank F.

Garside Library Memorial Fund":



Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Baker, Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Hazard,

Mrs. Ethel M. Woodbury, Las Vegas - $30

Bank of Nevada, Las Vegas - $10

Mrs. C. C. Boyer, Mrs. Robert Griffith, Mr. B. M. Jones,

Mrs. R. J. Stephens, Mrs. Harold Morse, Mrs. Hazel

Williams, and Mrs. Leo Mc Namee, Las Vegas - $35

Senator and Mrs. Howard W. Cannon, Las Vegas - $10

Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Cavanaugh, Las Vegas - $10

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Coluse, Las Vegas - $20

Daughers of the American Revolution, Las Vegas - $7.50

Mr. and Mrs. Earl F. Davison, Las Vegas - $5

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Grant, Las Vegas - $10

Mrs. and Mrs. Walter Hanson, Las Vegas - $5

Mr. and Mrs. Walter D. Johnson, Las Vegas - $25

Mr. Burley M. Jones, Las Vegas - $10

Mr. and Mrs. Victor Kunkel, Las Vegas - $10

Las Vegas Rotary Club, Las Vegas - $50

Mr. Myron E. Leavitt, Las Vegas - $25

Mc Namee, Mc Namee & Rittenhouse, Las Vegas - $15

The Mint, Las Vegas - $25

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Morse, Las Vegas - $10

Mr. and Mrs. Carl E. Olsen, Las Vegas - $5

P. E. O. Sisterhood, Chapter G, Las Vegas - $5

Mr. Vail Pittman, Las Vegas - $10

Brig. General and Mrs. James T. Roberts, Las Vegas - $15

Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Ronzone, Mrs. Bertha Ronzone, Las

Vegas - $50

Mr. and Mrs. C. K. Ryerse, Las Vegas - $10

Governor and Mrs. Grant Sawyer, Carson City - $10

Mr. and Mrs. Alden Sharp, Las Vegas - $5

Mrs. Ryland G. Taylor, Las Vegas - $25

Mr. Dill Wolfinger, Las Vegas - $10

Bonanza Printers, Employees of, Las Vegas - $63

Mrs. L. E. Anderson, Las Vegas - $8

Mr. C. A. Heckethorn, Carson City - $10

Mr. H. H. Wolleson, Las Vegas - $5

Mrs. Howard Mann, Las Vegas - copy of "Freedom of the

Press"



Bequests



Estate of Edgar J. Marston - $103,625 as follows:



Specific cash bequest under Article Fourth of the Last

Will and Testament - $10,000. Balance due of bequest

under Article Seventeenth of Second Codicil to Last

Will and Testament - $93,625.



Grants



National Science Foundation, Washington, D. C. - $49,900 for

support of a "Summer Institute in Mathematics for Secondary

School Teachers of Mathematics", under the direction of Dr.

R. N. Tompson, Department of Mathematics.



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mrs. Magee, carried

unanimously that the gifts be accepted and the Secretary

instructed to write notes of thanks to the donors.



14. Technical Institute Program



Dr. Armstrong recommended approval of the Proposed Technical

Institute Program for the University of Nevada as prepared

by Dr. J. Patrick Kelly, Acting Dean of Statewide Services.

Recommendations were as follows:



1. That two and three year certificate programs be estab-

lished immediately in the areas of Highway Technology,

Drafting and Design, Electronics and Automated Data

Processing. These programs to be offered in Reno, Las

Vegas, and other communities of the State where suf-

ficient enrollment warrants them.



2. That two and three year certificate programs be devel-

oped as rapidly as possible in Hotel-Motel Management

and in Machine Tool Design. These programs to be of-

fered in Reno and Las Vegas.



3. That a certificate program be developed as rapidly as

possible in Space Technology to be offered in Las

Vegas. This program to be of the type which meets

the need for trained technicians in the missile field.



4. That for the present time, University staff and facil-

ities in Reno and Las Vegas along with part-time in-

structors be utilized for the program as is now being

done. In other areas of the State where feasible,

the program will function in public school facilities

provided through cooperating with school administra-

tors.



5. That all programs of less-than-degree now being of-

fered or envisaged by various Colleges of the Univer-

sity as well as all certificate programs be under the

direct supervision of the Dean of Statewide Services

in accordance with accepted University administrative

procedures in order to have the same organization and

procedures for all programs.



6. That an advisory committee be appointed from the fac-

ulty of each College concerned with a particular pro-

gram to help in the establishment of the curriculum

and to serve as advisors and consultants.



7. That a committee be appointed to survey the needs of

the State of Nevada for different technical education

programs. The committee should also be charged with

the responsibility to study location for one or more

technical institutes, the feasibility of a building

program for technical institutes and the administra-

tion of the program.



8. That the registration fee for residents of the State

of Nevada be the same as charged by the University

for students in the academic program but the non-

resident tuition fee be set at $150 per semester until

such time as the fees can be more realistically eval-

uated.



9. That personnel in Statewide Services cooperate with

the Vocational Adult Education Division of the State

Department of Education personnel in planning and de-

veloping further the programs for craftsmen and sub-

technicians in the high schools of the State in keep-

ing with programs offered by the University of Nevada.



10. That every effort be made to develop, finance and offer

as many technical institute programs and to continue to

offer courses of a technical nature that would be fea-

sible and logical to meet the needs of the capable high

school graduate and to serve the economy of the State

of Nevada.




Budget for the proposed program amounted to $169,345 for

1963-64 and $169,980 for 1964-65, making a total for the

biennium of $339,325. It was proposed that this sum be re-

quested as an addition to the regular budget of the Uni-

versity.



Motion by Mr. Hug, seconded by Dr. Anderson, carried unani-

mously that the Technical Institute Program be approved and

that an appropriation be requested of the Legislature as a

separate item.



15. Personnel Recommendations



President Armstrong recommended approval of the following

personnel recommendations:



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE



Change in status as follows:



Walter Jim Whorton, Information Specialist, rank 2, to be

changed to Information Specialist in Charge, rank 2, at a

salary of $8400 based on twelve months' service, effective

October 15, 1962.



Appointments as follows:



Helen J. Wright as Home Agent, rank 1, Owyhee, Elko County,

at a salary of $7500 based on twelve months' service, ef-

fective October 22, 1962 (replacement for Agnes Sorenson,

transferred).



Darwin Bradfield as Assistant County Agent, rank 1, Lincoln

County, at a salary of $7400 based on twelve months' ser-

vice, effective November 15, 1962 (replacement for Clair

Christensen).



E. Irving Hackett as Assistant County Agent for Elko,

County, rank 1, at a salary rate of $7783 based on twelve

months' service, effective December 1, 1962 (replacement

for Fred Kurpjuweit).



Clinton Appelt as Assistant in Research in Animal Science

at a salary of $4800 based on twelve months' service, ef-

fective November 17, 1962 (new position).



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCE



Change in status as follows:



Thomas D. Gilmore, Research Assistant in Psychology, from

1/3 time at $1333 to 1/2 time at $2000 based on ten months'

service. Due to resignation of a Graduate Assistant, addi-

tional duties will be assigned to Mr. Gilmore.



Leave of Absence as follows:



Floyd Edsall, Assistant Professor of Health, Physical Edu-

cation and Recreation, without pay, for the second semester

of the 1962-63 academic year, in order that he might attend

the Associate Command and General Staff College at Fort

Leavenworth, Kansas.



DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE



Appointment as follows:



James Karl Kliwer as Research Associate in DRI and Lecturer,

Physics Department, at a salary rate of $9600 based on

twelve months' service, effective February 1, 1963 (new

position).



Allan E. Eldridge as Field Assistant at the salary rate of

$500 per month for the period October 24, 1962 to December

24, 1962 to work on collection of fundamental geologic and

hydrologic data on various projects (salary to be paid from

research grants).



Change in contract as follows:



Patrick Anthony Domenico, Research Associate in Hydrology,

from a salary rate of $7200 to a salary rate of $8700 based

on twelve months' service effective November 8, 1962, be-

cause of exceptional ability (salary to be paid from re-

search grants).



LIBRARY



Appointment as follows:



Patricia E. Stewart as Acquisitions Assistant at a salary

of $4500 based on twelve months' service, effective Novem-

ber 1, 1962 (replacement for Martha Brooks).



MACKAY SCHOOL OF MINES



Appointments as follows:



Bernard O. Lane as Lecturer in Geology-Geography at a month-

ly salary of $700 for the Spring semester 1962-63 (replace-

ment for E. R. Larson, on sabbatical leave).



Walter H. Mc Kesson as Laboratory Technician at the Nevada

Mining Analytical Laboratory and the Metallurgy Department

at a salary rate of $4800 based on twelve months' service,

effective November 1, 1962 (replacement for Jack S.

Radcliffe).



NEVADA SOUTHERN REGIONAL DIVISION



8 appointments in the Fall semester 1962-63 Evening Divi-

sion.



5 appointments in the Fall semester 1962-63 Real Estate

Basic Seminar.



6 appointments in the Fall semester 1962-63 Small Business

Seminar.



STATEWIDE SERVICES



Appointment as follows:



Ambassador Robert Dorden Reams as Visting Lecturer, Special

Programs, at a salary of $1500 for lectures on November 15,

29 and December 6, and other special lectures on Campus.



35 appointments in the Fall semester 1962-63 Evening Divi-

sion.



11 appointments in the Fall semester 1962-63 Off-Campus

Program.



21 appointments in the Fall semester 1962-63 National De-

fense Education Administration Program.



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mrs. Magee, carried

unanimously that the personnel recommendations be approved.



16. Visiting Distinguished Professorships



President Armstrong discussed and recommended approval of

Visiting Distinguished Professorships.



Motion by Dr. Anderson, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried unani-

mously by roll call vote that the following program as

presented by Dr. Armstrong be approved.



Occasionally we have opportunity to bring to the University

on annual appointment a distinguished Professor who is

available because of mandatory retirement regulations at

other Institutions, yet who still has much to contribute

to our educational program. Cases in point are Dr. Voskuil

and Dr. Haas in the School of Mines.



I believe it is highly desirable that we establish a pol-

icy governing such appointments, and in consultation with

members of the administrative staff, I have prepared the

following proposal and recommend it for approval:



1. Such individuals should be distinguished in an area

in which instruction is given at the University of

Nevada. Distinction should be based on scholarship,

research or creativity, not on mere wealth, politi-

cal position or public fame.



2. Appointments should be for a period of one year,

with additional one year appointments possible.

Additional appointments would depend on Department's

recommendation, evaluation of the appointee's con-

tributions to the University, the faculty and the

students, a continuing demonstration of mental and

physical activity, the need and demand for distin-

guished visiting Professors in other areas, and the

funds available.



3. Yearly appointments of distinguished visting Pro-

fessors may continue for five years, or until age

70, whichever comes first. In defining age 70, the

same criteria should be used as are applicable to

resident professional staff.



4. The number of such appointments in any given year

will depend on the availability of funds in reserve

or elsewhere, and upon the stipends necessary for

each individual.



Charles J. Armstrong

President



17. Committee on International Students



Dr. Anderson, Chairman of the Committee, discussed the Final

Report of the Committee which had previously been mailed to

each Regent. In the discussion which followed, slight

changes were suggested by Dr. Anderson.



Motion by Dr. Anderson, seconded by Mrs. Magee, carried

unanimously that the report be accepted, with the changes,

and with clarification and checking of the minutes regard-

ing item No. 4 (tuition waivers), which item will be subject

to review by the Board at the next meeting.



FINAL REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS



On September 9, 1961, the formation of a Regents-faculty-

student Committee on International Students was approved by

the Board of Regents. The first meeting was held September

25, 1961. Dr. Fred M. Anderson was named as Chairman, and

the following persons were appointed to membership: Mr. A.

C. Grant, Dr. Louis E. Lombardi, Mrs. Richard Magee, Dr.

Kenneth E. Young, Dean William D. Carlson, Dr. Jack Shirley,

Dr. Robert Mc Queen, Mr. Robert Laxalt, Professor Wendell

Mordy, Dean Sam Basta, Dean Elaine Mobley, Dr. Alex Dandini,

Dr. John Morrison, Mr. Robert Collison, Dr. Robert Clute,

Dr. T. V. Frazier, Dr. Kenneth Kuttler, Col. Gundlach,

Professor John Butler, Mr. Samuel Vaughn, Miss Cecilia

Molini, and at a later date, Mr. Procter Hug.



This Committee has been in operation now for 11 months.

During that time the members have held many meetings, re-

viewed a great deal of literature, invited in several auth-

orities as consultants, visited other Campuses with well-

developed international student programs, and attended

special conferences on international student problems.



As its first major action, the Committee produced a "State-

ment of Purpose for an International Student Program", sub-

sequently adopted by the Board of Regents, which read as

follows:



"Bearing in mind:



"That one of the most powerful forces for peace and

understanding in our time has been the mutual exchange

of students between nations;



"And that the University of Nevada's contribution to

this national effort has not grown at the same rate as

other American Universities;



"It is the aim of this Committee to foster an expanded

program of international student exchange at the Uni-

versity of Nevada, so as to fulfill our obligation of

assistance to the nation in its efforts towards world

peace, to broaden and enrich the understanding of our

students for the traditions and culture of the world's

peoples, and to offer our educational facilities to the

students of other lands in the basic cause of humanity

and progress."



The Committee also has stimulated action in a number of

areas designed to promote an orderly but vigorous growth

of the number of highly qualified international students in

the University student body. Among the steps taken have

been the following:



1. The University renewed its membership in the National

Association of Foreign Student Advisors.



2. The University adopted a policy regarding the housing

of international students which allows the Dean of

Student Affairs to reserve housing in the Dormitories

for international students if in his judgment they

would have difficulty finding housing off-campus due

to possible prejudice.



3. The University (by action of the Board of Regents,

March 3, 1962) became a participating member Institu-

tion in the African Scholarship Program of American

Universities. Under this program, financially support-

ed by the University and the Federal Government, a

student from Myasaland is enrolled at the University

in the field of Agriculture this Fall.



4. The University (by action of the Board of Regents,

April 28, 1962) set aside 15% of its out-of-state tui-

tion waivers (26 $150 fee waivers awarded for this Fall

semester) to be reserved for international students. A

full tuition waiver is the equivalent of a $600 yearly

scholarship; a half-tuition waiver is the equivalent

of a $300 yearly scholarship.



5. The University, working in cooperation with the Agency

for International Development of the U. S. Department

of State, has made possible the enrollment of five

AID-sponsored international students at the University

this Fall. A general contract between AID and the

University has been agreed to and lays the foundation

for continued activity of this kind.



6. The University is working closely with the National

Academy of Sciences in a study of a possible coopera-

tive program in mineral education designed to bring a

small number of students from Peru and Chile to the

University.



7. The University has been corresponding with Mr. Claire

Lee Chennault concerning the possiblity that the Gen-

eral Claire Lee Chennault Foundation, in line with its

stated objectives, might provide financial assistance

for a small group of qualified women from one or more

non-Communist Asian countries to study Nursing at the

University. The University hopes to provide tuition

waivers and possibly even other financial help in this

area.



8. University representatives have approached a number of

community groups (service clubs, for example) in an

effort to interest them in taking on the sponsorship

of one or more international student scholarships.



9. The University is working closely with the Institute

for International Education, the U. S. Information

Agency, and other national and international organi-

zations to carry the name of the University to inter-

national students who are interested in obtaining a

higher education in the United States, either through

self-financing or with support from other sources.



10. The University has established a position, currently

set up as a Graduate Assistantship, to serve as Inter-

national Student Advisor.



In this, its final report, the Committee makes the following

recommendations aimed toward the continued development and

strengthening of the international student program at the

University of Nevada:



1. The University should strive to raise the enrollment of

international students to 2% of the total enrollment in

the immediate future and to possibly 5% of the total en-

rollment eventually. (In the past ten years, the Uni-

versity has had from .52% to 1.35% of its enrollment

representative of international students.)



2. The University, in building international student en-

rollment, should place strong emphasis upon selecting:



a. High qualified students.



b. Upper division and graduate students.



c. Students representing a variety of nations and cul-

tures, but particularly from underdeveloped coun-

tries.



d. Students receiving financial support through such

sources as University scholarships, foreign govern-

ments, United States government support, and pri-

vate means.



3. In order to achieve these objectives, the University

should:



a. Continue to reserve a percentage of tuition waivers

for international students.



b. Seek funds to establish an account for use in paying

the $5 application fee for international students.



c. Adopt a more flexible policy regarding the admission

of international students, as follows:



(1) Official evidence of an educational level

equivalent to that of graduation from an ac-

credited United States high school must be

submitted.



(2) Evidence of above average ability in an aca-

demic curriculum as verified by offical trans-

scripts or satisfactory test scores must be

submitted.



(3) Certification from an officially recognized

agency or individual of a demonstrated abil-

ity to speak, write, and understand the Eng-

lish language must be submitted.



(4) Adequate proof of financial responsibility

or sponsorship by a reputable United States

citizen or organization for all obligations

while attending the University must be sub-

mitted.



(5) Satisfactory completion of the required medi-

cal examination including a smallpox vaccina-

tion within three years and an X-Ray for tu-

berculosis within the last year must be sub-

mitted.



(6) If transferring from another United States

educational institution, a letter from the

U. S. Department of Immigration Regional

Office authorizing the transfer is required

prior to registration.



d. Strive to increase the amount of funds available for

scholarships, grants-in-aid, and loans for all stu-

dents (including the international students).



e. Request State legislation to permit the part-time

employment of international students.



f. Press for early relief of the on-Campus housing

problem so that adequate, economical housing can

be provided for all students (including internation-

al students) who desire it.



g. Provide sufficient financial support to insure ade-

quate screening processes, orientation, special

counseling, and English language instruction for

international students.



4. Because international students inevitably present spe-

cial problems, it is recommended that:



a. University faculty members should be urged to pro-

vide some allowance for the language problem during

first year an international student is on Campus.

However, beyond that period of adjustment, the in-

ternational student should be expected to perform

comparably with American students and should be

graded accordingly.



b. International students under sponsorship who come

to the University for specific programs or for

limited periods of time should not be encouraged or

allowed to change their educational goals or to

extend their stay, except by decision of the spon-

soring agency.



c. No special programs should be established for in-

ternational students. However, international stu-

dents with special needs that can be met by the

University should be allowed to enroll as auditors.



5. This Committee should be disbanded. A small but repre-

sentative committee should be established, to deal with

the continuing problems of the international student.

The International Student Advisor should serve as con-

sultant to this sub-committee.



6. The Board of Regents should be commended for the inter-

est and support that its members have evidenced in sup-

port of an expanded and improved international student

program.



18. Historical and Natural Sites



Dr. Anderson discussed the subject of natural and histori-

cal sites in Nevada, especially those which have been neg-

lected and which are therefore deteriorating. He felt that

the University has a vital interest in the development and

preservation of these sites, and that this work would be

useful in the teaching and research areas of the University.

Since both the State Park Commission and the Chairman of

the State Museum Board have evidenced interest in cooper-

ating with the University, he proposed that the Regents

consider a proposal that the Regents invite the State Park

Commission and the Nevada State Museum to form a joint

committee with the University consisting of two represent-

atives from each to work together in coordinating the activ-

ities of the three groups in studying, developing and pre-

serving the historical and natural resources of the State

of Nevada.



Motion by Dr. Anderson, seconded by Mrs. Magee, carried

unanimously that the Regents go on record as favoring such

cooperative arrangement.



19. Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education



Dr. Anderson discussed briefly the WICHE program in Nevada -

that the three Commissioners are connected with the Univer-

sity, and that the program has been very helpful in the

placement of students in professional schools in the fields

of Medicine, Dentistry and Veterinary Medicine. In the

interest of education in general, he believed it would be

in order for the University to endorse the program and the

budget.



Motion by Dr. Anderson, seconded by Dr. Lombardi, carried

unanimously that the Board of Regents go on record as be-

ing in support of the budget submitted to the Governor for

the next biennium for the WICHE program in Nevada.



20. Educational Planning Committee



Copies of the "Final Report of the University Educational

Planning Committee" to the President, dated Ocrober, 1962,

had been mailed to the Regents prior to the meeting. Dr.

Armstrong discussed the report briefly and proposed that

the Board receive it officially and, if willing to do so,

direct the Administration to refer portions of it to ap-

propriate segments of the faculty or other bodies for study

and recommendation.



Motion by Mrs. Magee, seconded by Dr. Lombardi, carried

unanimously that the report be accepted and that the

President be authorized to refer segments of it to appro-

priate persons, committees or groups for further study

and for specific recommendations for the future development

of the University.



21. Faculty Contracts



For the information of the Board, President Armstrong pre-

sented the following statement, approved by the University

Council on November 15, 1962, to be used as desired by the

Administration:



"The University, its students, the community at large, and

the professions, have the right to regard the University

faculty as upholding the highest standards of professional

ethics and conduct.



"Any breach of contract by a faculty member should, except

in unusual circumstances, be recognized as a breach of

professional ethics and a disservice to the University and

the University community.



"It is, therefore, the clear responsibility of every faculty

member to give the University ample notice of any intended

abrogation of the terms of his contract."



22. Nepotism



President Armstrong discussed the nepotism situation as it

affects the University, especially in the instance of a

husband and wife, both of whom are qualified for positions

at the University, but who are prohibited from such service

because of previous ruling by the Board of Regents. This

has been a handicap to the University. President Armstrong

recommended the following policy statement on Nepotism,

which was approved by the University Council on November 15,

1962:



"In the current highly competitive job market the

University is faced with a formidable, often insur-

mountable, task in securing adequate numbers of qual-

ified professional personnel. Each passing year fur-

ther aggravates the problem.



"The University Code (Chapter III, Personal Policy and

Procedure for the Professional Staff) provides an in-

strument for insuring that all professional appoint-

ments are based upon pure achievement criteria and

national competition.



"The adjunction of any nepotism restriction, therefore,

can afford the University no additional assurance of

quality of personnel; yet, by depriving the University

of access to a portion of the, already small, market

of professional personnel, it places the University at

a competitive disadvantage.



"Accordingly, it is recommended that no form of nepo-

tism constraint be superimposed upon the hiring poli-

cies of University Professional Personnel as set forth

in the University Code, and that the University Admin-

istration be asked to consider similar policies for

classified and technical personnel."



Mr. Porter was asked if there are any legal restrictions

which should be considered and his opinion was that there

are none.



Motion by Dr. Anderson, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried unani-

mously that the above policy be adopted.



23. Meeting of University Attorneys



Mr. Porter called attention to the fact that the National

Association of University Attorneys will hold its meeting

on June 20-22, 1963, on the University Campus. He noted

that it is necessary that dues to the organization be paid.

President Armstrong so recommended.



Motion by Mr. Germain, seconded by Mrs. Magee, carried

unanimously by roll call vote that the Administration be

authorized to pay dues into the Association as follows:

($20 for first membership and $5 for each subsequent mem-

bership):



For Mr. John Porter - $20

For Mr. Procter Hug., Jr. - $5



24. Educational Organizations, Clark County



Mr. Grant had received and forwarded to the President cor-

respondence received from the Presidents of educational

organizations in Clark County containing a statement of

problems encountered in connection with attendance at the

University of Nevada. Copies were distributed to members

of the Board. The item is to be placed on the agenda for

the next Board meeting.



25. Next Meeting



The next meeting of the Board was set for Saturday, January

26, 1963, in Reno.



The meeting adjourned at 3:40 P.M.



A. C. Grant

Chairman



Alice Terry

Secretary

11-30-1962