10/19/1989

UCCSN Board of Regents' Meeting Minutes
October 19-20, 1989








10-19-1989

Pages 74-104



BOARD OF REGENTS

UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA SYSTEM

October 19-20, 1989



The Board of Regents met on the above date in Rooms 201-202,

Donald Moyer Student Union, University of Nevada, Las Vegas.



Members present: Mrs. Dorothy S. Gallagher, Chairman

Dr. Jill Derby

Dr. James Eardley

Mr. Joseph M. Foley

Mr. Daniel J. Klaich

Mrs. Carolyn M. Sparks

Mrs. June F. Whitley



Members absent: Dr. Lonnie Hammargren

Mr. Sig Rogich



Others present: Chancellor Mark H. Dawson

President Anthony Calabro, WNCC

President John Gwaltney, TMCC

President Robert Maxson, UNLV

President Paul Meacham, CCCC

President Ronald Remington, NNCC

President James Taranik, DRI

Vice President Dennis Brown, UNR

Mr. Don Klasic, General Counsel

Dr. Warren Fox, Vice Chancellor

Mr. Ron Sparks, Vice Chancellor

Ms. Mary Lou Moser, Secretary



Also present were Faculty Senate Chairmen Deborah Ballard-Reisch

(UNR), Paula Funkhouser (TMCC), Alan Gertler (DRI), Mike Hardie

(WNCC), Tom Kendall (Unit), Nancy Master (UNLV), Michael Mc

Farlane (NNCC) and Norma Suchy (CCCC) and Student Association

Officers.



Chairman Dorothy Gallagher called the meeting to order at 9:40

A.M. Thursday, October 19, 1989.



1. Approved the Consent Agenda



Approved the Consent Agenda (identified as Ref. A, filed

with the permanent minutes) containing the following:



(1) Approved the minutes of the regular meeting held Sep-

tember 7-8, 1989 and the special teleconference meeting

held September 26, 1989.



(2) Approved the gifts, grants and contracts, listed in

Ref. C-1, filed with the permanent minutes.



(3) Approved the following appointments to the UNLV Propos-

ed Law School Advisory Group (all of Las Vegas except

David Zenoff, who is from Carlsbad, Ca.):



Robert Buckalew Nancy Master

Joe Bunin John F. Mendoza

Robert Callister Donald M. Mosley

Bill Curran James Pico

Drake De Lanoy Phillip M. Pro

Joseph M. Foley Frank A. Schreck

Dominic Gentile Miriam Shearing

Addlelair Guy Carolyn M. Sparks

Harry Hinderliter, III Larry Strate

William Jansen J. Charles Thompson

Jan Laverty Jones Earle W. White, Jr.

Randall Jones David Zenoff

Jerry Mack



(4) Approved emeritus status to be granted to Mr. Dwight

Marshall, Emeritus Dean of Continuing Education, UNLV,

effective upon approval.



(5) Approved to waive the 1-year notification for early re-

tirement for Lydia de Castro-Svetch, effective December

31, 1989, and to grant emeritus status effective Janu-

ary 1, 1990, with the title Emeritus Associate Profes-

sor of Nursing, UNR.



(6) Approved a 10% increase in salary compensation for Dean

Bill Davies, WNCC College Services, for additional as-

signed administrative duties. These duties include co-

ordination and development of College construction and

improvement projects.



(7) Approved the following interlocal agreements:



A. UNS Board of Regents/UNR and Nevada Department of

Human Resources, Division of Mental Hygiene and

Mental Retardation



Effective: Beginning UNR's Fall '89 semester and

ending July 30, 1990

Amount : $34,417 maximum to UNR

Purpose : UNR to provide clinical experience and

training to social work students.



B. UNS Board of Regents/UNR and Nevada Department of

Wildlife



Effective: July 1, 1989 to June 30, 1990

Amount : $23,948 to UNR

Purpose : Black Bear in Western Nevada study.



C. UNS Board of Regents/UNR and Nevada Department of

Wildlife



Effective: July 1, 1989 to June 30, 1990

Amount : $3,144 to UNR

Purpose : Sage Grouse Production and Mortality

Studies.



D. UNS Board of Regents/UNR and the Nevada Department

of Education



Effective: Upon approval by Board through June 30,

1990

Amount : $47,000 maximum to UNR

Purpose : UNR to maintain and recruit local

school/agency teams, develop training

with families, disseminate plan and

training agenda to committees and de-

velop training module on procedures for

school enrollment including barriers to

and paper work necessary for enroll-

ment, education and counseling.



E. UNS Board of Regents/University of Nevada School of

Medicine and the Nevada Department of Human Re-

sources, Division of Mental Hygiene and Mental

Retardation



Effective: August 1, 1989 to June 30, 1991

Amount : $20,000 maximum to School of Medicine

Purpose : School of Medicine to provide pediatric

care for Southern Nevada Child and Ado-

lescent Mental Health Services.



F. UNS Board of Regents/UNR and Nevada Commission on

Tourism



Effective: October 1, 1989 to October 1, 1990

Amount : $15,000 maximum to UNR

Purpose : UNR to collect data in order to track

trends in Nevada tourism.



Mr. Klaich moved adoption of the Consent Agenda and approval

of the prepared agenda with the authority to change the or-

der of items as specified throughout the meeting. Mrs.

Sparks seconded. Motion carried.



2. Introductions



Dr. Alan Gertler, DRI Faculty Senate Chairman, introduced

Steve Mizell, DRI Faculty Senate Vice Chairman.



Mrs. Whitley entered the meeting.



3. Chairman's Report



Chairman Gallagher reported on many positive events which

have occurred throughout UNS.



She attended the Facility Master Planning meeting which was

an excellent experience and the Committee's directions are

commendable.



The Newsweek article naming UNLV as one of the outstanding

Universities in the country which was very positive, not

only for UNLV, but for UNS, and the State of Nevada.



Nevada higher education has experienced another year of in-

creased enrollments. Throughout the System enrollment fig-

ures have indicated more high school valedictorians and

more Nevada high school graduates are attending UNS insti-

tutions than in past years. One of the priorities through-

out the System has been to educate Nevadans about UNS in

order to attract students. She commended the entire System

on its efforts in increasing enrollments.



The quality of new faculty being hired is very much improv-

ed. The Administration and faculty search committees are

doing a great service to the System in hiring exceptional

new faculty.



She announced the appointments to a newly established ad hoc

Committee on Regent Awards. The Regents to serve on the

Committee are: James Eardley as Chairman, Joseph Foley,

Daniel Klaich and Carolyn Sparks. This Committee has been

charged with reviewing the procedures and criteria for vari-

ous Regent awards.



UNLV has obtained the Supercomputer. This endeavor is a

special program for UNLV and the System. She commended all

those who worked diligently in obtaining this program.



She requested feedback from the Regents on the new format

of the Board of Regent meetings.



Chairman Gallagher informed the Board that the Budget and

finance Committee is now meeting as a Committee of the

Whole. It has come to her attention that fellow Regents are

not well informed of the budget process. She has directed

Vice Chancellor Ron Sparks to make presentations at future

meetings on each of the steps in the budget process. She

has also directed the Presidents to make presentations re-

garding their own Campus budgets. It is hoped these meas-

ures will lead to a better understanding of the budget proc-

ess.



Chairman Gallagher requested the Faculty Senate Chairmen to

develop a list of faculty on each Campus who have distin-

guished themselves and report to the Board at each meeting.

It is Chairman Gallagher's thought that these people should

be recognized by the Board of Regents for their endeavors.



4. Chancellor's Report



Chancellor Dawson stated that the Board of Regents had re-

quested information regarding Systemwide coverage for stu-

dent health insurance. He reported that this issue has been

assigned to a committee which will compare the two programs

at the Universities to see if it would be feasible and in-

dicated that approximately 15% of the student body enroll

for student health insurance coverage. He will report back

to the Board on the findings of the Committee. UNR Faculty

Senate Chairman, Deborah Ballard-Reisch requested that the

graduate students be represented in this study.



He reported that during the 1980 reapportionment UNS re-

quested Dr. Eleanor Bushnell to prepare a study for the

Board of Regents on the Regent districts. Since the 1990

reapportionment act is upon us, he has contacted Dr. Bush-

nell who has agreed to prepare another study for the Board

of Regents. In the preliminary stages there are 133,000

residents per district, and if expanded that may change to

109,000 residents per district based upon current projec-

tions. Dr. Bushnell will present her report to the Board

of Regents at its December meeting.



5. Approved Resolution



Approved a resolution in remembrance of Governor Charles

Hinton Russell.



RESOLUTION #89-9



In remembrance of Charles Hinton Russell

1903-1989



The Board of Regents of the University of Nevada System

wishes to pay its respects to the late Charles Hinton

Russell in this remembrance of his contributions to

education, to Nevada, to his country and to the world

he worked to make better during his 85 years.



Born in Lovelock, Russell spent his childhood on a ranch

in Deeth, graduating from Elko County High School in

1922 and the University of Nevada in 1926. Following a

year of teaching school in the Ruby Valley and working

on various ranches, Russell spent nearly 20 years as a

newspaper editor and publisher of the Ely Record.



Elected to the State Assembly from White Pine County in

1934, he served that House for 3 Sessions and was twice

elected to the State Senate. Elected Nevada's lone Con-

gressman in 1946, he helped President Truman design the

Marshall Plan to provide economic relief to post-war

Europe.



Serving as Nevada's Governor from 1950-58, Russell is

credited with establishing the Gaming Control Board,

State purchasing and personnel systems, consolidated

school districts and the State sales tax to benefit an

education system in crisis. The people of Nevada, at

his urging, approved the tax in a special election.



Following two gubernatorial terms and a 3-year U. S.

State Department appointment as Director of AID Mission

in Paraguay, Russell returned to the Silver State, once

again as a public servant for education. Russell became

Director of Development of the University of Nevada,

Reno until retirement.



More than his tremendous service record to Nevada and

the nation, his gubernatorial successor Grant Sawyer

recently offered, "Charles Russell will be remembered

above all for his kindness, and for being a man of great

conscience and honesty."



The Board of Regents extends its sympathy to the Gover-

nor's wife of 50 years, Marjorie Guild Russell, their

5 children and 13 grandchildren for their recent loss.



Mr. Foley moved approval of the resolution in remembrance

of Governor Charles Hinton Russell. Dr. Derby seconded.

Motion carried.



It was requested that individual copies be presented to

Governor Russell's wife and children.



6. Approved the Appointment of Dean, College of Business

Administration, and Tenure, UNR



Vice President Brown announced the appointment of Dr. Laurie

Larwood as Dean of the College of Business Administration,

effective July 1, 1990. Approved tenure for Dr. Larwood as

Professor of Managerial Science and approved a salary sup-

plement of up to $10,000 per year to be paid to the Univer-

sity from the University of Nevada, Reno Foundation.



Mr. Klaich moved approval of the appointment of Dr. Laurie

Larwood to the position of Dean of the College of Business

Administration at UNR, with a salary supplement of up to

$10,000 per year from the UNR Foundation, effective July 1,

1990. Further moved approval of tenure for Dr. Larwood as

Professor of Managerial Science. Mrs. Whitley seconded.

Motion carried.



7. Information Only - Amendment, Board of Regents Bylaws



The first reading of proposed amendment to the Board of Re-

gents Bylaws, Article VI, Committees of the Board was read:



Section 6. In the event that there are not enough members

of a standing or special committee available to make a

quorum of the committee at the time of its meeting, and if

there are a sufficient number of other members of the Board

of Regents available at the time, the Chairman of the Board

of Regents, or the Vice Chairman in the absence of the

Chairman, may make a sufficient number of ad hoc appoint-

ments from among the remaining members of the Board of Re-

gents to make up a quorum of the committee. The ad hoc

members shall serve only for the duration of the meeting

for which they were appointed.



Mrs. Sparks recommended deleting the words "the remaining

members of the Board" and substituting new language to make

the provision consistent with the previous reference to "a

sufficient number of other members of the Board available

at the time". General Counsel Klasic said he would make the

change for the next meeting.



8. Interim Report on UNS Master Facilities Plan



Chancellor Dawson commended Vice Chancellor Fox on the out-

standing performance he has accomplished on the UNS Master

Facilities Plan.



Vice Chancellor Fox presented an interim report on the UNS

Master Facilities Plan. He reported that Board of Regents

has provided some funding to the Campuses for the develop-

ment of their own master facilities plans. The Campus plans

have been delivered to the System Administration Office for

independent consultants review. The consultants have met on

each of the Campuses to discuss the plans.



In response to the rapid growth UNS has experienced and the

changes in Campus needs, a new process for capital construc-

tion has been developed. The draft of the UNS Capital Con-

struction Process is as follows:



1) Each institution will update its physical master plan

every two years and provide the Chancellor and the Re-

gents with a standardized statistical profile describ-

ing the physical dimensions of each Campus operated by

the institution. This profile will include the area

(gross square feet) by type and age of facility. The

Presidents will identify Campus capital construction

needs.



2) The Board of Regents will set priorities for the types

of new space and remodeling of existing space (class-

room, class laboratory, research laboratory, office and

auxiliary space) needed by the University System.



3) The Chancellor will apply appropriate UNS space formulas

including growth in student FTE to the Campus data to

determine the need for space in the Regents' priority

areas. Based on the results of these calculations, the

Chancellor will propose a capital construction list to

the Council for Presidents.



4) The Presidents will review the list and participate in

the construction of the capital request in priority

order.



5) The Chancellor will forward a capital construction list

to the Board of Regents for approval.



The UNS space formulas, as mentioned in number 3 above, will

be presented at the December Board of Regents meeting. Mr.

Klaich questioned if other items would be included in these

formulas, and Vice Chancellor Fox responded that formulas

using FTE would be used for projected space for instruction,

research labs, class labs and offices. Mr. Klaich stated

that occasional growth should be integrated into the formu-

las. Vice Chancellor Fox assured Mr. Klaich that would be

included, and that a depreciation schedule will be included

in the formula.



A draft of the UNS Capital Construction Priorities is as

follows:



Based on Campus needs identified in the draft Campus physi-

cal master plans, and review and recommendations by the

Chancellor and the Presidents, priorities for 1991-93 cap-

ital construction within the System have been identified.

The following priorities are recommended to the Board of

Regents for its consideration.



1) Construction of new instructional space and general

faculty office space;



2) Major remodeling and expansion of existing structures;



3) Instructional and research laboratories space;



4) Auxiliary and support space.



Vice Chancellor Ron Sparks indicated that two lists will be

presnted to the Board. One list will contain the UNS Capi-

tal Construction Priorities, as mentioned above, and the

second list will contain minor remodeling and repairs of old

buildings in the amount of $5 million per year. This second

list does not normally go before the State Public Works

Board.



Vice Chancellor Fox indicated that space for part-time in-

structors is included in the formula and that it is based

on needs. Each of the Presidents will have a chance to ap-

prove the list before it becomes final. President Maxson

stated that the Chancellor's Office has included each of

the Campuses throughout its discussions regarding the UNS

capital construction process and priorities.



Mr. Klaich questioned if DRI was included in the formula and

Vice Chancellor Fox indicated that DRI does not have FTE,

but does need faculty office space and major remodeling and

expansion. DRI has been requested to supply the number of

actual faculty to be included in the final figures. Presi-

dent Taranik stated that DRI has been included in the proc-

ess. DRI has experienced a 15% growth per year and employs

approximately 300 persons. President Taranik thanked the

Chancellor's Office and Board of Regents for its support of

DRI.



Upon questioning, Vice Chancellor Sparks stated that main-

tenance of the buildings is accounted for in a separate

budget.



Mr. Foley requested that the Campus requests be included in

the final report to the Board of Regents.



Both the draft of the Facilities Master Plan and the Capital

Construction list will be presented to the Board of Regents

at their December meeting, with final action scheduled for

January.



9. Information Only - International Programs



Chancellor Dawson presented a review of Campus international

programs, as contained in Ref. C, filed in the Regents Of-

fice. Chairman Gallagher stated that international programs

would be placed on the Board of Regents Workshop agenda for

further discussion.



The open meeting recessed at 10:35 A.M. and reconvened at 1:40

P.M. Thursday, October 19, 1989, with all Regents present except

Regents Hammargren and Rogich.



10. Personnel Session



Upon motion by Dr. Eardley, seconded by Mr. Klaich, the

Board moved to a closed personnel session for the purpose

of discussing the character, alleged misconduct, profes-

sional competence or physical or mental health of a person

in accordance with NRS 241.030.



Upon motion by Mr. Klaich, seconded by Mrs. Whitley, the

Board moved to open session. Motion carried.



11. Approved the Sale of General Obligation Bonds, UNS



Approved the sale of Nevada State General Obligation Bonds

for the UNLV Health Science Center project and refunding on

the Events Center bonds. Mr. Paul Howarth, Howarth and As-

sociates, and Mr. John Swenseid, Bond Counsel, presented the

results of the sale.



Mr. Howarth indicated that 9 bids were received with the

lowest bid from Citicorp at 6.9% interest rate. This re-

flects a $800,000 savings from the last sale of bonds. Mr.

Howarth introduced Mr. Marty Johnson who has worked dili-

gently on this project and commended him for his efforts.

Mr. Howarth recommended that the Board of Regents accept

the bid from Citicorp.



Dr. Eardley moved approval of the sale of Nevada State

General Obligation Bonds for the UNLV Health Science Center

project to Citicorp at 6.9% interest rate. Mr. Klaich

seconded.



The savings incurred on the refunding will be used for oper-

ation and maintenance for the two event centers.



Mr. Foley voted no. Motion carried.



12. Annual Report of the University of Nevada Medical School



Vice President Brown introduced Dean Robert Daugherty who

presented the annual report of the University of Nevada

Medical School. He announced that the School of Medicine

is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year. The School

of Medicine has developed a 30-minute video documenting the

accomplishments of the School. He reported the following

figures:



1969 1989



Graduates 8,000 16,000

Freshmen 10,000 16,000

Women 10% 30%



13. Approved Process for the Possible Discharge of a Tenured

Employee



A report was made to the Board of Regents in a closed per-

sonnel session concerning the discharge from employment of

a tenured faculty member of a member institution of the

University of Nevada System for unprofessional conduct and

sexual harassment. Should a timely appeal of the employee's

discharge be received by the Board of Regents, the appeal

will be heard in closed personnel session, with final action

to be taken by a vote of the Board in open session.



Chairman Gallagher stated that the Board has received a

letter of appeal dated October 13, 1989 from Counsel for

Dr. Thomas Harrington. The Board has also received and re-

viewed the Administrative Officer's Reply statement to

notice of appeal dated October 17, 1989.



Before further processing the appeal, the Board desired

briefing from both parties.



The briefs should include a discussion of the following:



1) Does the UNS Code provide due process and other

constitutional and statutory protection?



2) Was the procedure of the UNS Code followed in this

matter?



3) The merits of the appeal.



The brief of Dr. Harrington will be filed and served upon

the Administrative Officer within 20 calendar days of their

meeting. A reply brief of the University shall be filed

within 15 calendar days of the filing of Dr. Harrington's

brief. Briefs are limited to the record of the hearing.



A hearing on the appeal will be an agenda item for the next

regularly scheduled meeting of the Board of Regents. Dr.

Harrington and/or his counsel will be notified of the hear-

ing before the Board. Dr. Harrington and/or his counsel

will be urged to attend and will be given the opportunity

to argue the appeal before the Board of Regents.



Mr. Klaich moved approval of the above stated procedure.

Dr. Eardley seconded. Motion carried.



14. Approved Advanced Facilities Planning, State Public Works

Board



Approved a list of UNS facilities projects which require ad-

vance planning. The State Public Works Board has announced

limited funds are available for advance planning of future

State facilities projects with requests submitted to their

office by October 27, 1989.



After some discussion, the Chancellor was directed to revise

the UNS Capital Improvement Planning Fund Requests and sub-

mit to the State Public Works Board. The list is filed in

the Regents Office.



Dr. Eardley moved approval of the advanced facilities plan-

ning list to be submitted to the State Public Works Board.

Dr. Derby seconded. Motion carried.



15. Budget and Finance Committee



The Budget and Finance Committee meeting as a Committee of

the Whole under Chairmanship of Regent Eardley acted as

follows:



(1) Approved the expenditure of Capital Improvement Fee

Funds in the amount up to $62,000, over a 5-year period

for an addition to the Diesel Shop at NNCC.



Mrs. Whitley moved approval to use up to $62,000 of

Capital Improvement Fee Funds, over a 5-year period,

for an addition to the Diesel Shop at NNCC. Mr. Klaich

seconded. Motion carried.



(2) Approved the UNR self-supporting budget for School of

Medicine/Psychiatry, as contained in Ref. B-2, filed

in the Regents Office.



Mrs. Sparks moved approval of the UNR self-supporting

budget for School of Medicine/Psychiatry. Mrs. Gal-

lagher seconded. Motion carried.



(3) Approved a University of Nevada Press repayment sched-

ule of $5,000 biannually beginning January 1, 1990,

until the loan is fully paid.



In June, 1987 the Board approved a loan to the Univer-

sity of Nevada Press in the amount of $50,000 to fi-

nance book manufacturing. The Press has repaid $15,000

leaving a balance of $35,000. The original terms of

the loan provided for repayment in 2 years; however,

the need for book manufacturing money still exists.



Mrs. Whitley moved approval of a University of Nevada

Press repayment schedule of $5,000 biannually begin-

ning January 1, 1990, until the loan is fully repaid.

Mrs. Sparks seconded. Motion carried.



(4) Approved authorization to use funding from the SIIS

account up to $60,000 to clean up and dispose of radi-

ation materials which have accumulated throughout the

University of Nevada System. The State previously had

approved using the SIIS account for funding the entire

radiation program. Clean up and disposal would be

handled through the UNS Radiation Safety Board. This

item also requires approval from the State Budget Of-

fice and Interim Finance.



Mrs. Whitley moved approval to use State funding from

the SIIS account up to $60,000 to clean up and dispose

of radiation materials which have accumulated through

the University of Nevada System. Mr. Klaich seconded.

Motion carried.



After a lengthy discussion regarding the budget process, the

Committee requested a 2-hour session in the near future to

discuss such budget issues as parameters, priorities, for-

mulas and enhancing the base budget.



The open meeting recessed at 2:30 P.M. and reconvened at 8:12

A.M. Friday, October 20, 1989, with all Regents present except

Regents Hammargren and Rogich.



16. Regents' Workshop



The Board met in a workshop session in the Fireside Room,

Donald Moyer Student Union, UNLV. Two presentations were

made regarding the UNS Research Council and the UNS Founda-

tions.



A. DRI president Jim Taranik reported that the UNS Research

Council was created October 1987 by the Chancellor and

Presidents of DRI, UNLV and UNR. The UNS Research

Council was created to provide a single point of contact

for dealing with State and Federal Government on Nuclear

Waste Research, as requested by the State Nuclear Waste

Projects Office. The mission of the UNS Research Coun-

cil was to promote research throughout the System. Its

goals were to facilitate acquisition of Systemwide re-

search programs and to assist in coordination of exist-

ing Systemwide research programs. The objectives were

to 1) act as a UNS focal point for Systemwide research

initiatives; 2) promote research with UNS by identify-

ing new sources of support for facilities, equipment

and staff; and 3) facilitate entrepreneurial research

acquisition by each Campus.



The members of the UNS Research Council consisted of

the DRI President (now Vice President for Research),

UNLV Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and

Provost, UNR Vice President for Academic Affairs, UNLV

Dean of Graduate College and UNR Dean of Graduate School

(now Associate Vice President for Research). The Coun-

cil provided recommendations to the Chancellor and the

Presidents of DRI, UNLV and UNR.



The State Nuclear Waste Projects Office chose to deal

with the individual Campuses. The Department of Energy

then chose to make arrangements with individual Campus-

es. Therefore, the last formal meeting with the UNS

Research Council was held on April 4, 1988. Since then,

informal meetings have been held by the Vice Presidents

of DRI, UNLV and UNR since Spring, 1989, but not under

the aegis of the UNS Research Council.



President Taranik recommended that the Academic Affairs

Council establish a subcommittee to include DRI Vice

President Bill Bishop, so that information can flow to

the Presidents, Chancellor and the Board of Regents.



President Taranik emphasized that the UNS Research Coun-

cil was developed as an advisory council to the Presi-

dents of DRI, UNLV and UNR. Mrs. Whitley stated that

there are many research contracts to be signed, and dur-

ing the time when she was Chairman of the Board she did-

n't feel it was necessary to inform the members of the

Board on each research contract. Mr. Klaich stated

that it was not the intent of the Board to monitor con-

tracts, but that the Board should be notified when sen-

sitive issues arise.



President Maxson informed the Board that UNLV accepts

research contracts by asking 1) is the contract legiti-

mate research? 2) is UNLV capable of performing the

work? and 3) does UNLV have the facilities; i. e., labs,

space and equipment? If the answers are "yes", then the

contracts are signed. He stated that the Department of

Energy contract regarding Yucca Mountain did not seem,

at the time, to be a controversial issue. It was the

feeling that the State of Nevada would want to conduct

its own research on the project and use its own scien-

tists. The Presidents always try to inform the Board of

Regents of any sensitive issues.



Chairman Gallagher stated that the Board of Regents

should be made aware that some of this research will

continue for a long period of time and will be politi-

cally sensitive. Mr. Klaich added that he hoped other

research contracts would not be turned down and that

this discussion would not "chill" the efforts of the

scientists in the System. President Taranik stated

that the reaffirmation by the Board at its September

7-8 meeting regarding Academic Freedom has alleviated

some of the fear by the scientists within the System.



B. Mrs. Edna Brigham, UNS Endowment Director, was requested

to discuss the relationship of the institutional founda-

tions to their institutions and to the Board of Regents.

She introduced Sandi Cardinal, Internal Audit Director,

and Janet Mac Donald, Deputy Treasurer. She praised

the foundations and the dedicated people of Nevada who

serve on the foundation boards.



Mrs. Brigham stated that the rich resources that the

foundations have brought to the Colleges, the Univer-

sities and to DRI have contributed to the value of all

higher education in the State of Nevada. These re-

sources come to the System in the form of the valuable

time, energy, support and dedicated service of some of

Nevada's most talented and successful civic and State-

wide leaders. There is no doubt that the foundations

have attracted and made a part of the school's activi-

ties many friends who had not heretofore been active

in supporting our institutions. These resources which

have come to higher education through the foundations

also represent substantial financial support for our

institutions and for programs that could not be avail-

able to our students without this private effort.



Because of the values and potential values, as well as

the possibilities of misuse or abuse are so great, it

is incumbent upon all parties to define ares of re-

sponsibility for decision making so that the State sys-

tem of higher education continues to grow and develop

and to enjoy the confidence of its donors and friends.



Mrs. Brigham outlined some of the reasons the Board of

Regents must assume responsibility for overseeing the

operations of the foundations. Maintaining the proper

arm's length separation between the foundation and the

institution it serves, while at the same time infusing

the foundation with the proper amount of oversight by

the Board of Regents, requires some delicate balancing

and the drawing of some fine lines. She outlined the

following reasons why Regents should be invovled:



1) The Regents have been given by the constitution of

the State of Nevada the rsponsibility for the gov-

ernance of the State system of higher eduction.



2) The Regents serve as corporate members of each

foundation.



3) The Regents represent the individual institutions

which are the beneficiaries of the foundations and

which make the tax-exempt privilege of the founda-

tions possible.



4) The Regents have a responsibility to all donors

who give to any institution, either directly or

through a foundation which bears the name of the

institution.



The responsibilities mean the following:



1) The Regents have a responsibility to maintain the

integrity and the unchallenged reputation of the

individual institutions and the State System.



2) The Board must see to it that the administrative and

accounting guidelines previously adopted by the

Board of Regents are followed, and the Board must

examine and review those guidelines regularly to

see that they are current and adequate. Like Nevada

many states are working to develop guidelines for

workable relationships between the foundations and

State systems. The State of Connecticut has already

enacted legislation which exercises considerable

control over foundation funds so that State spending

procedures are followed. There have been enough

incidents of misbehavior in University foundations

throughout the country to make us aware that if we

don't police ourselves, someone will do it for us.



3) The other main responsibility of the Regents is to

make sure that all grants and gifts from the founda-

tion are made to enhance the stated mission of the

institution and are formally accepted by the Board

of Regents before the program is set in motion.



Mrs. Brigham requested Mrs. Cardinal to outline briefly

the administrative and accounting guidelines as they

are now written, and to outline the financial statements

we require the foundations to submit which tell you

about the actions of the foundations and what these

statements do not tell you.



Mrs. Sandi Cardinal, Internal Audit Director, stated

that the guidelines, as stated in the Board of Regents

Handbook, give specific requirements on how foundations

accept and distribute gifts, the procedures in admin-

istering the gifts, and the procedures of reporting

gifts to the Board of Regents.



The foundation financial statements are prepared by

management in accordance with the accepted standards.

The auditor is responsible for performing an audit in

accordance with professional standards. The financial

statements are prepared using estimates and judgments

for some items, such as vacation pay accruals. The

materiality concept is used in auditing the foundations.

This varies according to the size of the entity being

audited.



Auditors are independent of management. They form an

opinion based on selective testing. They rarely review

all items because of the cost of testing more items.

The auditors use skill and judgment to select items.

There is a small percentage tested. The audit is di-

rected toward the discovery of material misstatements

in financial statements to provide reasonable assurance.

The auditors report on financial statements as a whole,

not on individual items in financial statements. The

audit is concerned with financial presentation, not

financial quality of the entity, wisdom of management

decisions, or risk of doing business with the entity.

The objectives of the auditors report is to describe

what the auditor has done and to communicate what the

auditor has found.



Mrs. Brigham requested Ms. Mac Donald to review the

separation or the arm's length relationship which af-

fects not only tax-exempt privileges but also any lia-

bility that one institution may improse upon another.



Janet Mac Donald Kendall, Deputy Treasurer, opened the

discussion with a brief description of the 2 sections of

the Internal Revenue Code (IRC), Sec. 501(c)(3) and 509

which directly affect the tax exempt status of the foun-

dations and the personal liability of their Directors.

Ms. Mac Donald explained that she did not possess the

experience or expertise to properly interpret and assure

compliance with the IRC, but that she had obtained a

recommendation for an outstanding individual who did

have these qualifications. William Hutton of the San

Francisco Law Firm of Howard and Hill is an expert in

the area of foundation tax law. He has extensive ex-

perience teaching the subject. It was agreed, after a

lengthy discussion, that Ms. Mac Donald contact Mr.

Hutton to arrange 2 teaching, question and answer work-

shops, in Reno and Las Vegas for Regents, and founda-

tion staff and Directors. The consequences of non-

compliance with IRC are unacceptable to all concerned.

The workshops are the Board of Regents continuation

to help assure no such noncompliance occurs.



The second subject Ms. Mac Donald was asked to discuss

was the importance of separating the foundation from

the University or Community College it serves. The

foundations were formed as separate legal organizations

with distinct separate authority and responsibility.

This separateness has to be honored in substance and in

spirit, otherwise the justification for the existence of

the foundations can be challenged by the State. Some-

times the requirements to maintain separateness is in-

convenient but naturally is part of the price for the

privilege of autonomy and exemption from State rules.

Ms. Mac Donald recommended that the Board of Regents

require each UNS institution to annually execute an

agreement with their respective foundations. The

agreement would stipulate the property and personnel

of the State institution that the foundation will use.

The agreement would be accompanied by actual cash re-

imbursement for incremental expenses incurred by the

State due to the agreed upon usage of the State re-

sources.



Ms. Mac Donald provided information on type of funds

held and managed by foundations to further emphasize

separateness of the foundation and State institution.

It was explained that the foundations have special re-

sponsibility in accepting restricted gifts because it

is the Board of Regents and not the foundation that must

accept or reject a donor's restrictions. In many juris-

dictions all restricted funds are transferred immediate-

ly to the State Board of Regents. In Nevada rules are

more lenient allowing for the management of endowment

and other restricted funds by the foundations. Unre-

stricted current funds are fully controlled by the foun-

dation in Nevada but in other jurisdictions the State

Board of Regents reserve the authority to approve budg-

ets by these unrestricted funds. Clearly the only le-

gally acceptable expenditures by any foundation would

be for operating expenditures and fund raising. Any

other expenditures would not be in line with the re-

quirement for the separations of the foundation from

the State institution. Questions were answered and the

discussion closed.



In summary, Mrs. Brigham stated that the entire System

should be grateful to the foundations for their many

efforts on behalf of higher education. It is also be-

lieved that the Board of Regents need to be assured in

some way that the integrity of the System is maintained,

that the foundations do not by their actions place their

tax-exempt privilege in jeopardy, that the foundations

do not incur any liabilities on behalf of the System,

that programs are within the stated mission of the

schools and, finally, that foundation funds are managed

in a prudent and responsible manner.



17. Emergency Item: Resolution



Chairman Gallagher requested approval to consider an emer-

gency item on the agenda to approve a resolution supporting

the City of San Francisco, which recently experienced a

devastating earthquake.



Mr. Klaich moved to accept an emergency item concerning a

resolution supporting the City of San Francisco. Dr. Derby

seconded. Motion carried.



18. Approved Resolution



Approved the following resolution supporting the City of San

Francisco.



RESOLUTION #89-10



To the City by the Bay and its neighbors:



The University of Nevada System Board of Regents joins

Governor Bob Miller in expressing its concern and con-

dolences during this time of enormous tragedy. Our

Silver State shares a close bond spanning more than a

century. Our riches built your great city. As you

rebuilt, please remeber that your eastern neighbor ap-

plauds your spirit and your resilience. To the fami-

lites of those who lost their lives, please accept our

condolences during this time of bereavement. We urge

all Nevadans to join in voicing our concern and support

and lending our neighbors a helping hand in all ways

possible.



Mr. Foley moved approval of the resolution supporting the

City of San Francisco. Dr. Derby seconded. Motion carried.



19. Annual Report of UNS Endowments



Chancellor Dawson introduced Mr. Matt Lincoln, Cambridge and

Associates, who presented the annual report on UNS endowment

funds, as filed in the Regents Office. The long term objec-

tives of the UNS endowment are to preserve the purchasing

power of the existing endowment and to ensure that future

generations of students will receive the same level of sup-

port from the existing endowment as do current students.

In order to accomplish these objectives, the UNS Endowment

must reinvest a portion of investment return equal to in-

flation and limit annual spending to no more than the aver-

age return in excess of inflation.



The long term objectives of the endowment investment return

are to be 5% above inflation and to expect to do much better

in some years and worse in other years. The short term ob-

jectives are over 3 to 5 years with the Stock Portion to ex-

ceed S & P 500, the Bond Portion to exceed Shearson Lehman

Composite, and the Total Fund to exceed performance of Index

Portfolio (75% S & P 500 and 25% Shearson Lehman Composite).



The Investment Committee was conservative for the year in

its approach to asset allocation. The total equity manager

allocations is 70% with the remaining 30% for the total fix-

ed income manager allocations.



Mr. Lincoln stated that 8% of endowment funds are set aside

for real estate funds. Real estate funds did not achieve

its short term target, but are expected to show good prog-

ress in the next 5 to 8 years.



The total UNS Endowment did not meet its objectives for the

1988-89 fiscal year. This result was in part from the UNS

decision to hold unusually high cash reserves, and partly

from the relatively poor performance of the UNS management

team.



Additionally, in July, 1987 UNS allocated approximately 8%

of the endowment to 2 institutional-quality, diversified

real estate funds. While UNS believes these funds can pro-

duce inflation-adjusted returns of 6% or more over the long-

term, they underperformed the stock market return in 1988-89

and hence lowered the total endowment's results.



Over the 5 years since July 1, 1984 both the total fund and

the equity and bond manager teams have exceeded UNS 3 to 5

year performance objectives, and the purchasing power of the

endowment has grown considerably.



Mr. Klaich stated that he was pleased with the UNS Endowment

report. The Investment Committee has been diligent, calling

each of the managers to express its concerns. The Board of

Regents has a fiduciary responsibility to students and to

the institutions, and must keep apprised of the long-term

objectives of the endowment. UNS needs to be vigilant to

policing the money managers. Mr. Lincoln stated that the

guidelines provide for review over a 3-year rolling period

of time.



Chairman Gallagher and Vice Chairman Sparks commended Mr.

Lincoln on the diligence and excellent advice. UNS has

done very well in comparison with other institutions.



20. Report and Recommendations of the Academic Affairs Committee



A report and recommendations of the Academic Affairs Commit-

tee meeting, held October 19, 1989, were made by Regent

Joseph Foley, Chairman.



(1) Vice Chancellor Fox updated the Board of Regents on the

issue of Student Voluntarism and Community Service

Activities. Student Voluntarism and Community Service

has been addressed at the University level at this

time. The program would stress strong public service

to the community. It was felt that commitment to the

community already exists. He suggested that a formal

assessment on internships be performed, and that the

Campus representatives feel that the program should be

strictly volunteer on the part of the students. UNS

is exploring different ways to satisfy this credit and

will report back to the Committee.



Mr. Joe Bunin, CSUN President, stated that the Senators

have discussed this issue with their constituents.

There are already 50 volunteer programs on the UNLV

Campus and some academic Departments already require

voluntarism. He stated that there was a negative re-

action to making this a mandatory program for the stu-

dents. CSUN is exploring the establishment of a clear-

ing house for volunteer activities at this time. CSUN

will continue to encourage voluntarism throughout the

Campus.



Mr. Glen Krutz, ASUN President, expressed his apprecia-

tion to Mr. Sig Rogich for addressing the voluntarism

issue. The response he has received from the UNR Cam-

pus is that the students do not wish this to be man-

datory and request that the program be unique to each

of the Campuses. UNR is exploring different options.



Mr. Klaich certified that the Board of Regents has not

approved this concept at this time, and requested ad-

ditional information before it would be approved by the

Board.



Vice President Brown stated that there is a great deal

of interest within the College of Human and Community

Sciences in providing substantive opportunities for

students as well as course work in the area of volun-

tarism. The College's pilot program is proposed to be

implemented in the 1990 Fall semester.



(2) Approved the amendments to Title 4, Chapter 16, Section

III, 1 and 2 of the Board of Regents Handbook which are

based upon changes approved by the Board of Regents in

September. These revisions reflect changes in ACT test

scores and clarification of high school mathematics

course requirements. See Ref. AA-2, filed in the Re-

gents Office.



(3) Approved the College of Fine and Performing Arts at

UNLV, as contained in Ref. AA-3, filed in the Regents

Office.



This new College will combine the Departments of Art,

Dance Arts, Music and Theatre Arts, currently located

in the College of Arts and Letters. All program and

degree requirements will remain unchanged.



President Maxson stated that an interim Dean will be

appointed and UNLV will begin the search process for

a new Dean of the College.



In addition, the Committee recommended approval that

the College of Arts and Letters be renamed the College

of Liberal Arts. With the formation of the College of

Fine and Performing Arts, the term "College of Liberal

Arts" is a more accurate designation.



This new organizational structure will enhance the

quality of all programs and provide students with ex-

panded opportunities in the performing and fine arts.

Separate accrediting organizations representing the

arts strongly support this proposed change. Funding

for a Dean, 2 classified persons and operating costs

will be provided from existing institutional resources.

The Board of Regents approved the endorsement of a plan

to establish the new College at its June, 1989 meeting,

pending submission of a formal new program proposal.



President Maxson stated that the College will utilize

the present space available, but anticipates that non-

state funds will be forthcoming for additional space.



General Counsel Klasic stated that in approving this

new College, the UNLV Bylaws would require a change.

Chairman Foley requested that those changes be placed

on the Consent Agenda in December.



(4) President Maxson announced that the Departments of Cur-

riculum and Instruction and Secondary, Postsecondary

and Vocational Education within the College of Educa-

tion at UNLV has been merged. Goals of the merger are

outlined in Ref. AA-4, filed in the Regents Office.

The reorganization and formation of a new Department of

Instructional and Curricular Studies will involve no

new degrees, changes in curriculum or additional costs

to the University.



General Counsel Klasic stated that in approving this

merger, the UNLV Bylaws would require a change. Chair-

man Foley requested that these changes be placed on

the Consent Agenda in December.



Mr. Foley moved approval of items 2, 3 and 4 of the report

and recommendations of the Academic Affairs Committee. Mrs.

Whitley seconded. Motion carried.



21. Report on Student Retention and Attrition



Regent Foley requested an update of activities related to a

Systemwide study of student retention and attrition, includ-

ing a recent survey of Camuses concerning retention activi-

ties. Ref. F, filed in the Regents Office, addressed the

following issues throughout the System: 1) placement test-

ing, 2) academic advising and personal, career and academic

counseling, 3) developmental or remedial services, and 4)

data collection.



Chairman Gallagher requested that further study on student

retention and attrition be addressed by the Academic Affairs

Committee.



22. Report and Recommendations of the Audit Committee



A report and recommendations of the Audit Committee meeting,

held October 19, 1989, were made by Regent June Whitley,

Chairman.



(1) Internal Audit Director Sandi Cardinal introduced Mr.

Wayne Stoker, Mr. John Surina and Mr. Glenn Storer of

Deloitte, Haskins & Sells, who presented the audit of

the UNS Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular

A-110, July 1, 1986 through June 30, 1988. The audit

report is filed in the Regents Office.



Mr. Stoker stated that there were no material weak-

nesses found during their report on internal control

structure and compliance report. The institutions

have responded to the auditors' findings.



It was brought to the Committee's attention that CCCC

had not reported its Federal Financial Assistance

funding for 1987 and 1988. The Committee requested

that a report be presented with those figures.



(2) Internal Audit Director Sandi Cardinal presented the

audit of the UNLV Scholarships, July 1, 1987 through

December 31, 1988. The audit report is filed in the

Regents Office.



(3) Internal Audit Director Sandi Cardinal presented the

follow-up report on the UNR Scholarship Office staff.

The follow-up report is filed in the Regents Office.



(4) Internal Audit Director Sandi Cardinal presented the

follow-up report on the UNR Parking Services audit.

The follow-up report is filed in the Regents Office.



(5) Internal Audit Director Sandi Cardinal presented the

follow-up report on the University of Nevada School

of Medicine, Savitt Medical Library audit. The fol-

low-up report is filed in the Regents Office.



(6) Internal Audit Director Sandi Cardinal presented the

follow-up report on the UNLV Residence Hall audit.

The follow-up report is filed in the Regents Office.



The Committee requested that Vice President Buster

Neel report when all recommendations have been imple-

mented.



(7) Internal Audit Director Sandi Cardinal presented the

follow-up report on the DRI Stead and Dandini Librar-

ies audit. The follow-up report is filed in the Re-

gents Office.



(8) Internal Audit Director Sandi Cardinal presented the

follow-up report on the UNR Police Department audit.

The follow-up report is filed in the Regents Office.



(9) Internal Audit Director Sandi Cardinal presented the

follow-up report on the UNR Residential Life/Housing

audit. The follow-up report is filed in the Regents

Office.



(10) Internal Audit Director Sandi Cardinal presented the

follow-up report on the TMCC Learning Resources Center

audit. The follow-up report is filed in the Regents

Office.



(11) Internal Audit Director Sandi Cardinal presented the

follow-up report on the UNLV Upward Bound Program,

Special Services Program audit. The follow-up report

is filed in the Regents Office.



(12) Internal Audit Director Sandi Cardinal presented the

follow-up report on the WNCC Library audit. The fol-

low-up report is filed in the Regents Office.



The Committee requested a report on all Departments at all

institutions be compiled stating estimated completion dates

for Departmental procedures manuals.



Mr. Klaich moved approval of the report and recommendations

of the Audit Committee. Dr. Derby seconded. Motion car-

ried.



23. Report and Recommendations of the Investment Committee



A report and recommendations of the Investment Committee

meeting, held October 19, 1989, were made by Regent Daniel

J. Klaich, Chairman.



(1) Approved the establishment of an endowment with the

Bessie C. Gilmer Trust to be administered by the Chan-

cellor's Office. The endowment is to be used for

scholarships for women who have devoted their lives

to their family and plan to re-enter the work force,

or who are single parents attempting to increase their

earning capacity through education. The financial

needs of the woman, and not her previous scholastic

performance, serve as the primary criteria for selec-

tion. Recipients are eligible to attend any UNS in-

stitution in the State of Nevada.



Bessie C. Gilmer left 1/3 of the remainder of the trust

she established at her death:



To the University of Nevada to be used in such

manner as shall be determined by its governing

board for the purpose of furthering the objects

and welfare of said University.



Final distribution from the trust has been received in

the amount of $73,703.33.



(2) Approved, with recommendation by Cambridge and Associ-

ates, to delegate proxy voting to UNS Investment Man-

agers. Specific instructions will be provided to man-

agers to independently analyze proxies and vote in the

manner which will maximize return to stockholders so

long as that vote is not inconsistent with University

of Nevada System statement of social responsibilities.



The managers will maintain records of proxy voting for

the UNS, complying with DOL and SEC requirements.



Mr. Klaich moved approval of the report and recommendations

of the Investment Committee. Mrs. Whitley seconded. Motion

carried.



24. Report and Recommendations of the Ad Hoc Committee on

Community College Faculty Relations



A report and recommendations of the ad hoc Committee on Com-

munity College Faculty Relations meeting, held October 19,

1989, were made by Regent Jill Derby, Chairman.



(1) The Board of Regents will receive the Committee's final

report at its December 7-8, 1989 meeting. The Commit-

tee will meet on Thursday, November 9 and Friday, De-

cember 1 to complete its task prior to the December 7-8

meeting.



(2) Chairman Derby gave an overview of the activities of

the Committee, as filed in the Regents Office. In her

report she stated that self improvement in individuals

comes from honest self-reflection. Organizations that

have the courage to look inward can grow and better

themselves. The faculty carry the burden of delivering

higher education to students. She quoted from the

"Building Communities Report" of the Commission on the

Future of Community Colleges: "We believe that the

renewal of Community College faculty is absolutely

crucial. If renewal is not forthcoming, if faculty

support is not available, the Community College will

have depleted its most essential resource." The Board

of Regents want the faculty to be treated with respect

and dignity which they deserve in this System. The

Board of Regents set the tone when they listen to the

concerns and consult with the faculty in its deliber-

ations. It is the intent of the Board to find out

what isn't working as well as it could and help make

it better. The Board wants to encourage and support

those who are closest to the problems to help faculty

make improvements.



Dr. Derby stated that she had heard several times that

faculty exhibited some paranoia during the process --

fear of reprisal for open disclosure during the hear-

ings, skepticism that the Committee would be thorough-

going, balanced and fair in its efforts. On the other

side, she perceived apprehension on the part of Ad-

ministrators over the criticism that could follow an

open disclosure of problem areas raised by faculty.

Many of us in our different capacities have contributed

to the tension. We need to put behind us our mistrust

and our differences and work together in a spirit of

greater cooperation and conciliation.



The Committee was established to identify and address

Community College faculty concerns. The context of the

motion was made because of interest by some faculty in

the establishment of a separate bargaining unit for the

Community Colleges. Part of the Board's rationale was

to alleviate the pressure that resulted from interest

in collective bargaining. The centrality of faculty

concerns was clear cut. As the meetings progressed,

however, there was a tendency to assume that faculty

and administrative concerns of Community College per-

sonnel are one in the same, because in many cases they

are. The result was a tendency to assume a more gen-

eral Community College focus rather than a specific

faculty one. The broader, more inclusive focus, is of

course a worthy and much needed one and a perspective

that both Community College faculty and Administrators

share. The hearings report and survey support that

finding. The focus will not be lost as the Committee

directs its attentions to recommendations which the

Committee will be developing to place before the full

Board in December. Everyone connected with the Com-

munity Colleges will benefit from the focus this Com-

mittee is directing to their issues. The faculty need

to be assured that their separate issues where they

have been identified will not be lost in the Commit-

tee's tendency to focus on the broader level.



Dr. Derby stated that the difficult task of how to ad-

dress some of the major issues which the Committee has

identified lies ahead. The Committee needs to forge a

consensus and offer some substantive, significant rec-

ommendations to the full Board in December.



(3) Hearings for Community College faculty and Administra-

tors were held on each Campus during the week of Sep-

tember 11-14, 1989. The process for the hearings and

the results were reviewed. Chairman Derby stated that

she has been receiving telephone calls and letters con-

cerning the hearings. A synopsis of the letters was

distributed and is filed in the Regents Office.



In discussing the results of the hearings, Chairman

Derby stated that the faculty were apprehensive in

coming forth before the Committee because there were

too many Administrators present at the hearings. They

felt that reprisals would have been made if they were

to speak openly. Mr. Klaich stated for the record that

the thought of an environment in higher education where

faculty were afraid to speak for fear of reprisal was

repulsive to him.



President Meacham stated that the attendance of Admin-

istrators at the hearings was discussed at a Regents

meeting and it was indicated that the hearings were

open meetings and that the administrators should be in-

cluded in these hearings. Chairman Derby stated that

she had hoped that the hearings would be attended pri-

marily by faculty, but because of the open meeting law

Administrators were able to attend. In order for sen-

sitive concerns to surface the survey was developed.

It was hoped that the survey would alleviate some of

the tension.



In discussing the actual hearings, Mr. Klaich stated

that the time for the hearing at WNCC went quickly

and was a very interesting and exciting hearing. Mrs.

Sparks agreed with Mr. Klaich's statement and added

that the faculty at TMCC, for the most part, were hap-

py with their jobs, but wanted to make the System bet-

ter. Mr. Paul Nelson, WNCC representative, stated that

the faculty was very appreciative to have the Board of

Regents on the Campus to listen to their concerns. Dr.

Calabro stated that at times during the hearings it was

hard to remember that the subcommittee was there to

listen and not to react.



The Community College hearings report was distributed

and is filed in the Regents Office.



(4) Upon direction of the Committee, a survey of Community

College faculty and Administrators was conducted at the

beginning of the Fall semester. The results of the

survey were reviewed. Chairman Derby distributed a

chart that contained major findings from the survey and

hearings. The chart is filed in the Regents Office.



Mr. Klaich felt that it was appropriate for the Commit-

tee to report back to the Board of Regents and focus on

a few major issues regarding policy. He felt that many

of the concerns brought out by the hearings and survey

cannot be controlled by the Board of Regents. Chairman

Derby suggested that many of the concerns could be di-

rected to such areas as budgeting, articulation and

communication skills and that a follow-up report be

made to the Board of Regents on these issues. Mr. Bob

Rose, Nevada Faculty Alliance representative, noted

that there were 3 broad topics which surfaced through-

out the Committee's endeavors: 1) Faculty-Administra-

tion Relations; 2) Community College and Board of Re-

gents Equal Partnership; 3) Compensatory Budget/Employ-

ment Conditions.



Mr. Mike Hardie, WNCC Faculty Senate Chairman, request-

ed a breakdown by Campus of the responses to aid them

in addressing their own concerns.



Mrs. Gallagher stated that the compensation issues will

be addressed in future meetings of the System Compensa-

tion Committee. She further stated that those Communi-

ty College issues that directly involve the Board of

Regents will be addressed at the upcoming Board of Re-

gents Workshop.



Mrs. Sparks commended Chairman Derby for the tremendous work

and time devoted to this Committee.



Dr. Derby moved approval of the report and recommendations

of the ad hoc Committee on Community College Faculty Rela-

tions. Mr. Klaich seconded. Motion carried.



25. Report and Recommendation of the Ad Hoc Committee on Regent

Awards



A report and recommendation of the ad hoc Committee on

Regent Awards meeting, held October 19, 1989, were made by

Regent James Eardley, Chairman.



(1) The Committee reviewed procedures and guidelines for

granting the Distinguished Nevadan Award and approved

reinstating the language contained in the March 1,

1958 Board of Regents minutes as contained in Ref.

R-1, filed in the Regents Office.



Chairman Eardley stated that the reason to establish

this Committee is to clarify the process in granting

Regent Awards.



Mr. Klaich stated that the Distinguished Nevadan Award

is a very significant award bestowed by the Board of

Regents to recognize outstanding service by the public

sector. Some feel that over the years the importance

of the award may have been lost and needs to be re-

established.



President Maxson agreed that the Distinguished Nevadan

Award is bestowed by the Board of Regents. The Honor-

ary Doctorate and Honorary Associate degrees are award-

by the individual Campuses in recognition of academic

contributions to higher education and, as such, he felt

it should be earned, not an award that is automatically

given. It was emphasized that the Distinguished Nevad-

an award is not a political award and the Board of Re-

gents' guidelines must be strengthened to avoid grant-

ing such endorsements for political reasons.



Mr. Foley stated he felt that the discussion of nomi-

nees for these awards should remain in closed personnel

session of the Board of Regents, and that a special

screening committee is not necessary. He added that

the criteria should be sent to all nominators and the

nominations should then be justified by the nominators.



Mrs. Gallagher requested that the Committee develop a

new process and new criteria form.



In discussing additional awards, the Committee felt

that a "Regent" award and a "Chancellor's" award are

one and the same.



With regard to President Crowley's suggestion of grant-

ing an honorary award to excellent K-12 teachers, Mr.

Foley felt that it was not in the best interest of the

Board of Regents, adding that the State Board of Educa-

tion bestows its own awards upon those outstanding

teachers.



Dr. Eardley moved approval of the report and recommendation

of the ad hoc Committee on Regent Awards. Mrs. Whitley

seconded. Motion carried.



26. Approved Sale of Property, NNCC



Approved the sale of a 35-acre parcel of land, appraised at

$50,500. The parcel was sold at a public sale on October 4,

1989, with funds realized from the sale to be retained for

NNCC purposes.



Mrs. Whitley moved approval of the sale of a 35-acre parcel

of land with funds realized from the sale to be retained

for NNCC purposes. Dr. Eardley seconded. Motion carried.



27. Discussion on the Sale of Property, UNR



Vice President Brown had requested approval of the sale of

property received by the School of Medicine as part of the

Estate of Blanche Scranton. The property was appraised 6

months ago by the Estate at a value of $105,000. Vice Pres-

ident Brown requested the Board to accept an offer of

$75,000 in cash. After a lengthy discussion, the Board

withdrew the item and directed Vice President Ashok

Dhingra to have the property appraised at its current value.



Information: General Counsel Klasic informed the Board that his

Assistant General Counsel Bob Ulrich contested a

will which was overturned reinstating the Univer-

sity of Nevada, Reno as the major beneficiary of

the estate, and wished to publicly acknowledge

his hard work in achieving this ruling.



28. Approval of Sale of Property, UNR



Approved sale of UNR's 1.5 acre parcel of land in Sparks,

Nevada. In 1981 UNR received ownership to a 1.5 acre parcel

of land in Sparks from Dr. and Mrs. Frank Stokes. In 1986

the Nevada Department of Highways purchased portions of the

property for widening of the street and intersection. Dur-

ing a title search by NDOT, it was discovered that the Uni-

versity also owned a small 3000 square foot parcel across

the street. This parcel is located at the end of a dead-end

and abandoned road, and is landlocked by permanently in-

stalled traffic barriers.



Sierra Pacific Power Company has offered to purchase the

property for $3000 for an easement for their water line.



The Boy Scouts of America, who are to receive 1/3 of the

proceeds, agree with the sale.



General Counsel Klasic recommended approval subject to re-

view of sale documents.



Dr. EArdley moved approval of the sale of property for UNR.

Mrs. Sparks seconded. Motion carried.



The meeting adjourned at 11:20 A.M.



Mary Lou Moser

Secretary of the Board

10-19-1989