08/19/1955

 

UCCSN Board of Regents' Meeting Minutes
August 19-20, 1955




08-19-1955
Volume 7 - Pages 150-162

UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA
REGENTS MEETING
August 19, 1955

The Board of Regents met in the Riverside Hotel in regular ses-
sion on Friday, August 19, 1955. Present: Regents Hardy, Ross,
Lombardi, Grant, Thompson; Comptroller Hayden and President
Stout. Reporters who covered the meeting were Bob Laxalt, Bryn
Armstrong and James Hulse.

The meeting was called to order by the Chairman at 12 noon.

Minutes of Previous Meetings

Motion by Dr. Lombardi carried unanimously that the minutes
of previous meetings, as follows, be approved.

a) Regular meeting of June 4 and 6, 1955
b) Executive Committee meeting of July 13, 1955

Comptroller's Claims

The claims which had been approved by the Executive Commit-
tee were presented for approval of the Board.

Motion by Mr. Hardy carried unanimously that they be ap-
proved as follows:

Regents Checks, Nos. 45-185 to 45-202 inclusive for a
total of $229,044.34 for June.

State Claims, Nos. 45-160 to 45-171 inclusive for a
total of $62,745.04 and 45-172 to 45-180 for a total
of $55,077.23 for June.

Regents Checks, Nos. 45-203 to 45-207 and 56-1 to 56-17
inclusive for a total of $185,770.25 for July.

State Claims, Nos. 56-1 to 56-7 inclusive for a total
of $99,179.65 for July.

Bid Opening

President Stout reported on the meeting to open bids for
Heating Plant Alteration as per bid notice duly published
in local papers. Present at the meeting were Mr. Ross, Mr.
Poolman, President Stout and a representative of Savage and
Son, a bidding firm.

Bids were opened by Mr. Ross at 2:05 P.M. and were tabulated
as follows:

Hillcrest Plumbing & Heating Co. $6,850.00 (incl. add #1)
Savage and Son 6,286.00 (incl. add #1)
Monroe Plumbing & Heating Co. 6,880.50 (no indication
of add #1)

The bids were referred to Comptroller Hayden, Mr. Poolman and
President Stout for study, with authority for awarding the
contract.

After due consideration, the contract was awarded to Savage
and Son, the lowest bidder.

Motion by Mr. Grant carried unanimously that the Board of
Regents approve the awarding of the bid to Savage and Son.

Building Program

President Stout gave an informal report. At a meeting of
the State Planning Board, scheduled for Saturday afternoon,
August 20, matters concerning the University's building pro-
gram to be considered were: (a) bids will be opened for
the Student Union building, (b) architects will report on
remodeling of the Agricultural Extension building, (c) archi-
tects will present drawings for Manzanita Hall remodeling.

Enrollment Report for Fall Semester 1955

The Admissions Office report showed that on August 1 of this
year applications for admissions were 150 higher than at the
same time one year ago. Enrollment for the 1955 Summer Ses-
sions totaled 1528 students as compared with 565 in 1953. Of
the total 1528, enrollments at sessions held outside of Reno
were as follows: Elko 40, Ely 59, Las Vegas 330. Enroll-
ments in the post session of the Summer Session were 30,
making an overall total in this Summer's Session 1558.

Housing

The housing report for the coming semester was given as
follows:

a) Approximately 25 inquiries for family housing have been
received which cannot be cared for. At Victory Heights
80 units are now occupied. Two buildings will be re-
moved at the end of the Summer.

b) Lincoln Hall capacity is 105. All rooms have been as-
signed. Assigned to the recreation room - 10 (temporary
assignement). Hartman Halls capacity is 41 and 37 rooms
have been assigned. Following fraternity rushing, the
recreation hall will not be used in Lincoln Hall.

c) Artemisia Hall capacity is 40 rooms with 2 girls each,
80 girls. By crowding assignments, 90 girls can be
accommodated. Assigned to Manzanita Hall, 1st floor
only for first month during rushing reason, 20 girls.
Applications received to date, 92.

Capurro Property

Report was made that the University has now received a quit-
claim deed and title insurance for the 18 acres purchased
from Mr. Capurro, and that payment has been made to the
University.

Condos Estate

Office of the Attorney General notified the University that
real estate held by the Condos Estate has been sold and the
estate is in the process of closing.

Libyan Project

The President gave a brief summary of the status of the
Libyan Project and distributed copies of the report sub-
mitted by Deans Wood and Bertrand.

Student Fees

The President presented the recommendations of the Fee Study
Committee, as follows:

a) That for the academic year 1955-56, the following
schedule of student fees be in effect at the Southern
Regional Division, Las Vegas:

For all regularly enrolled matriculated undergradu-
ate students a basic registration and course fee of
$38, a health examination fee of $2 and a student
activity fee of $5, making a total consolidated fee
of $45, be charged. The regular out-of-state tui-
tion charge will also be in effect.

That in addition to the above, a general deposit of
$5 be assessed for all regular enrolled matriculated
undergraduate students carrying 7 or more credits.

Motion by Mr. Thompson carried unanimously that the
recommendation be approved.

b) That students enrolling for individual instruction in
Music be charged a fee of $30 per credit, such credit
to represent 1 30-minute individual lesson per week for
1 semester. (The present consolidated fee for the Reno
Campus covers only group instruction.)

Motion by Dr. Lombardi carried unanimously that the rec-
ommendation be approved.

College of Business Administration

President Stout presented the following report and recommen-
dation, which he had previously prepared:

Members of the Board of Regents August 19, 1955
University of Nevada
Reno, Nevada

Gentlemen:

The changing character of business enterprise in the
latter part of the 19th century and in the early part
of the 20th produced a University School of Business
Administration. During this period, business enterprises
became larger and more complex, and specialization de-
veloped in the various functions of business management.
With increased administrative responsibility, the busi-
ness leader more and more developed professional and
ethical attitudes, a realization of the existence of
economic forces, and an acceptance of research and sci-
entific methods in administration. More recently, the
increased participation of government in the super-
vision and regulation of business, the susceptibility
of American business to international affairs, the
growing complexities of human relations, the increased
competitive struggle, and the trend toward narrower
profits, have been conditions which have opened oppor-
tunities to Collegiate Schools of Business to educate
men for exacting managerial responsibilities and, thus,
to contribute to the general welfare.

The Wharton School of Finance and Commerce, established
in 1881 at the University of Pennsylvania, is historical-
ly the oldest Collegiate School of Business in the modern
sense in the United States. Two schools, the University
of California at Berkeley and the University of Chicago,
organized Business Administration Divisions in 1898. In
1900 Dartmouth College and New York University establish-
ed units. In 1908 Harvard University, Northwestern Uni-
versity and the University of Pittsburg opened Schools of
Business Administration. Almost without exception, the
more than 100 other formally organized divisions of
Business Administration in American Colleges and Univer-
sities were established after 1910.

There is an American Association of Collegiate Schools
of Business, which was organized at a conference of
representatives from 17 Collegiate Schools of Business
on June 17, 1916. Of the 17 schools represented at this
original meeting, 15 became charter members of the As-
sociation. With but one exception, all of these charter
members of the Association have continued membership to
the present time, and the two schools which were repre-
sented at the original conference, but did not become
charter members, have since accepted membership in the
Association. The purpose of the organization and the
activities of the Association have been to promote and
improve higher business education in the United States.
Membership at present is composed of 70 institutions
whose programs of instruction in business subjects have
achieved the standards established by the Association.
The members of the American Association of Collegiate
Schools of Business are listed on addendum I.

From time to time during the past 3 years, we have in-
formally discussed the need for the University of Nevada
to reorganize the work given in the area of Business
Administration and Economics so that this University
can give the service and leadership to that phase of
Nevada's economy that we are now doing in the areas of
Agriculture, Mining, Engineering and Education. It has
been our thought that the University of Nevada should
do for the business people of this State what other State
Universities and Land-Grant Colleges do for those engaged
in business in other states.

During the past year we have carefully studied our pro-
gram in Business Administration in comparison to those
recognized as being outstanding. Professor Palmer and
Hoyt gave leadership to a study of curricula in the
field presented by 21 representative Western Colleges
and Universities. Information was received also from
the American Association of Collegiate Schools of Busi-
ness. Research from the American Accounting Association,
American Finance Association, American Marketing Associ-
ation and the Society for the Advancement of Management
was utilized.

A survey has been conducted by Professors Hoyt, Palmer,
Dean Wood and myself, of business men from all parts of
the State and from most of the major industries to deter-
mine in what areas the University should expand in order
to be of greatest service to the business people. All
of the business men interviewed were very cooperative and
delighted to see the University of Nevada try to serve
better the business interests of the State.

The information collected stresses the great need for
the University of Nevada to improve its present program
of Business Administration if we are going to serve our
State and students well in that area. We must develop
our program in the areas of Accounting, Management,
Personnel, Finance, Marketing, Executive Secretarial,
Taxation and Business Education. We must revise our
requirements for both the regular 4-year and terminal
degrees to meet the standards set by the strong Colleges
of Business Administration. An improved and expanded
Business Administration program is needed now and it
will be needed even more in the future to meet the needs
of a rapidly expanding State for professionally trained
business people.

A good College of Business Administration for Nevada will
be rooted in the business of this State. It should be
our primary objective to prepare students for the busi-
ness of Nevada. The sumpathies of the faculty must al-
ways lie with Nevada business and business men.

A strong College of Business Administration should never
become a comfortable place to be, because business in
the State of Nevada and in the United States is dynamic
and restless. Both faculty and students must constantly
labor to keep up with business and to look ahead. They
can rest comfortably on a conviction that they know the
facts - as an astronomer knows the distance to the moon.
There should always be an atmosphere of intellectual
excitement, for no one will ever have a dogmatic answer
to any questions. The eternal search is for greater
insight into the great and complex American Business
System - for better ways to teach - for better ways to
learn.

The assumption that it is possible by a simple process
of telling to pass on knowledge in a useful form is a
very questionable one. If the learning process is to
become effective in areas of Business Administration,
something dynamic must take place in the learner. This
truth becomes more and more apparent as the learner
approaches the inevitable time when he must go into
action.

The case method is the essence of teaching in good Col-
leges of Business Administration. There are some lec-
tures, but few; some written reports, but very few.
Since a business man who has to make a decision cannot
turn to the back of a book and get the answer, good
Colleges of Business Administration believe that Busi-
ness students should wrestle with real problems, find
their own answers; and learn - through classroom dis-
cussions - that it is wise to listen to the other fel-
low, that often there are many ways to solve a problem,
and that sometimes there is none. The emphasis is
primarily on helping students to develop mental and
emotional skills in analyzing questions and reaching
decisions; it is only secondarily on acquiring informa-
tion.

In Nevada, case studies should be based upon Nevada
situations. A case is a written report, complete and
frank, of a crisis that has confronted some business
firm. Every detail of the situation is presented ac-
curately, except that the names of companies, individuals
and locations are sometimes disguised. An example of a
case might be the plight of a plumbing supply company
which had become fouled up for a maze of complex reasons
- lack of a clearly definted chain of command, poor com-
munications, personal jealousies and a half dozen others.
Classes should be conducted on a discussion basis in
which the case is presented and then the students in
the class analyze the company's problems, tell how they
would try to solve them, explaining the reasoning behind
their conclusions. Not all students will talk on any
one case, and some others will use many minutes. The
goal should be to concentrate on the training of judge-
ment, to increase the thinking capacity of the student
and to keep before him always the fact that Business
Administration is an art - not a science.

In addition to the undergraduate program, a good College
of Business Administration will offer courses for the
"Middle Management Group". These are young men with
some experience who have been selected by companies as
potential management material. Some will come to the
School at their own expense and others may be sent at
company expense for a year or a two year course.

There should also be an advanced management program of
a week, or month, a half semester or a semester in
length. These courses will be for experienced business
men who are back to pick up advanced training. Most of
these men may be sent by their companies to train them
for top management positions.

Faculty members of a good College of Business Administra-
tion should do more than teach their classes. They
should become consultants for various business firms in
order to keep their feet on the ground in practical prob-
lems. They should establish a Bureau of Business Serv-
ices and Research to enable them and their students to
conduct research into Nevada business so that the com-
panies of the State may have help in moving forward.
This Bureau should conduct short courses in the various
communities of the State on pressing problems in those
areas. The faculty and students should also publish a
"Nevada Business Review" periodically during the year
which will point out problems and their proposed solu-
tions for the business man of this area.

It is to be noted that good Colleges of Business Adminis-
tration assist business in the area so much that over the
years various professional chairs become endowed, for
example, a chair in Banking, a chair in Life Insurance,
a chair in Marketing or a chair in Hotel Management.

The University of Nevada is faced with the challenge of
providing a much needed improved and expanded learning
environment in the field of Business Administration.
Primarily it concerns organization and leadership in
the area of Business Administration.

Therefore, I wish to recommend that a College of Busi-
ness Administration be established at the University of
Nevada, with independence equal to the other Colleges on
the Campus. Such freedom is necessary to enable it to
develop and improve its program to the point where it
can become approved by the American Association of Col-
legiate Schools of Business.

Furthermore, I wish to request authorization to search
for and recommend for appointment, a person to Head this
College of Business Administration who will give us a
dynamic and sound program of development in this area.

Respectively submitted,

Minard W. Stout
President

Motion by Mr. Hardy that the recommendation be approved to
establish a College of Business Administration at the Uni-
versity of Nevada, carried with the following vote: Grant,
aye; Thompson, no; Lombardi, aye; Hardy, aye; Ross, aye.

Motion by Dr. Lombardi that the President be authorized to
search for and recommend for appointment a person to Head
the College of Business Administration at the University,
carried with the following vote: Grant, aye; Thompson, no;
Hardy, aye; Lombardi, aye; Ross, aye.

Personnel Recommendations

These were presented by the President as follows:

Student Affairs

1. Appointment of Samuel M. Basta as Student Counselor at
a salary of $5415 for the period September 1, 1955 to
June 15, 1956.

College of Education

1. Resignation of James A. Langford, Assistant Professor
of Education, effective July 1, 1955, in order that he
might accept a position at California State Polytechnic
Institute.

2. Appointment of Roy De Verl Willey as Professor of Edu-
cation at a salary of $6000 for the academic year 1955-
56.

3. Correction in recommendation for salary increase for
Clyde F. Mead, Assistant Professor of Education, ef-
fective July 1, 1955, to make his salary $5400 for the
academic year 1955-56.

College of Engineering

1. Appointment of Charles R. Breese as Instructor in Civil
Engineering at a salary of $4800 for the academic year
1955-56.

Library

1. Appointment of Anne H. Kenny as Library Assistant, ef-
fective July 1, 1955, at a salary rate of $2790 per
year.

2. Appointment of Carla C. Johnson as Library Assistant,
effective July 1, 1955, at a salary rate of $2658 per
year.

College of Arts and Science

1. Appointment of Carl W. Backman as Assistant Professor
of Economics, Business and Sociology at a salary of
$5200 for the academic year 1955-56.

2. Appointment of Donald E. Skabelund as Instructor in
Physics at a salary of $4800 for the academic year
1955-56.

3. Appointment of Harlan H. Holladay as Instructor in Art
at a salary of $4500 for the academic year 1955-56.

4. Resignation of Harold Richardson, Assistant Professor
of Psychology, effective July 1, 1955, in order that he
might accept a position at San Jose State College.

5. Leave of absence for Frank Richardson, Associate Profes-
sor of Biology, for the year 1955-56, without pay, in
order that he might accept a Visiting Lectureship at the
University of Washington.

6. Leave of absence for Charlton G. Laird, Professor of
English, for the year 1955-56, without pay, in order
that he might accept a Visiting Professorship at the
University of Oregon.

7. Leave of absence for Edwin Worley, Associate Professor
of Physics, without pay, for the academic year 1955-56
in order that he might take advantage of a research
opportunity at Fisk University, Tennessee.

8. Appointment of William H. Colbert, Jr. as Assistant in
Physics at a salary of $1800 for the academic year 1955-
56.

9. Appointment of Neil Alan Garrett as Graduate Assistant
in Health, Physical Education and Athletics at a salary
of $375 for the Fall semester 1955.

10. Appointment of Raymond Gonsalves as Graduate Assistant
in Health, Physical Education and Athletics at a salary
of $375 for the Fall semester 1955.

11. Appointment of Hugh D. Wilson as Graduate Teaching Fel-
low in Chemistry at a salary of $1260 for the academic
year 1955-56.

12. Appointment of Gerry J. Svob as Student Assistant in
Chemistry at a salary of $720 for the academic year
1955-56.

13. Appointment of Raymond L. Ferrari as Student Assistant
in Chemistry at a salary of $720 for the academic year
1955-56.

14. Reappointment of C. E. Shepherd as Lecturer in Meteor-
ology, Department of Physics, at a salary of $700 for
the academic year 1955-56.

15. Appointment of Verna D. Wittrock as Instructor in Eng-
lish at a salary of $4500 for the academic year 1955-56.

College of Agriculture

1. Reappointment of Walter H. Hesse as Assistant Professor
of Agronomy and Assistant Agronomist in the Agricultural
Experiment Station, effective July 1, 1955 at a salary
of $5400 for the year.

2. Appointment of John L. Fischer as Associate Professor of
Agricultural Economics and Associate Economist in the
Agricultural Experiment Station, effective July 1, 1955
at a salary of $7700 for the year.

3. Appointment of Howard H. Christensen as Assistant Pro-
fessor of Agricultural Education at a salary of $6000
for the year 1955-56.

4. Appointment of Martin A. Townsend as Soils and Plants
Research Technician with 1/2 time in the Agricultural
Experiment Station and 1/2 time in the Soils and Water
Testing Laboratory, effective August 15, 1955 at a
salary rate of $4500 for the year.

5. Appointment of Marilyn J. Horn as Assistant Professor of
Home Economics at a salary of $6500 for the academic
year 1955-56.

6. Appointment of Lillis H. Hatch as Student Assistant in
Child Development, Department of Home Economics, at a
salary of $1000 for the academic year 1955-56.

7. Appointment of Donald S. York as Assistant Agricultural
Agent for Washoe and Lyon Counties to work with the
Indian Service, effective July 1, 1955 at a salary of
$4500 for the year.

8. Appointment of Jess Martin Harris as Assistant Agricul-
tural Agent, Clark County, effective July 1, 1955 at a
salary of $4500 for the year.

9. Appointment of Harry W. Tavenner as Assistant Agricul-
tural Agent, Elko County, effective July 1, 1955 at a
salary of $4400 for the year.

10. Appointment of Agnes Sorenson as Home Demonstration
Agent at Large to work with the Indian Service effective
July 10, 1955 at a salary rate of $4800 for the year.

11. Reappointment of Harry L. Osborn as Assistant Agricul-
tural Agent in Ely to work with the Indian Service, ef-
fective July 1, 1955 at a salary of $4400 for the year.

12. Reappointment of Joseph B. Key as Lecturer in Animal
Husbandry for the Spring semester 1956 at a total sal-
ary of $630 for the semester.

13. Leave of absence for John M. Fenley, Agricultural Agent
in Clark County, without pay, from October 5, 1955 to
August 31, 1956, in order that he might accept a Ford
Foundation Fellowship in Extension Education at Cornell
University.

14. Resignation of Lyle Mc Cartney as Animal Husbandman,
Agricultural Extension Service, effective July 1, 1955.
Mr. Mc Cartney has accepted a position as Manager of a
ranch.

15. Resignation of George Zappettini as Extension Forestor
(1/2 time) effective July 1, 1955 to accept a full-time
position as Assistant State Forester-Firewarden.

Mackay School of Mines

1. Appointment of Edmond F. Lawrence as Assistant Geologist
at the Nevada Bureau of Mines, effective July 1, 1955
at a salary of $5940 for the year.

2. Reappoinment of Howard C. Brooks as Laboratory Assistant
at the Nevada Mining Analytical Laboratory, effective
July 1, 1955 at a salary of $280 per month for full-time
during the Summer months, and $140 during the school
year for 1/2 time service.

3. Appointment of Donald F. Divens as Museum Assistant
(student), effective September 1, 1955, at a salary of
$140 per month for 1/2 time work.

4. Reappointment of Robert W. Stephens as Assistant Re-
search Metallurgist, Atomic Energy Project, effective
July 1, 1955, at a salary of $5700 for the year.

5. Reappointment of Henry Phillip Ehrlinger III as Assist-
ant Research Metallurgist, Atomic Energy Project, effec-
tive July 1, 1955, at a salary of $5700 for the year.

6. Reappointment of Duncan William Frew, Jr. with promotion
to Junior Research Chemist, Atomic Energy Project, for
the months of July and August 1955 at a salary of $320
per month.

7. Reappointment of Lester L. Crawford as Laboratory Help-
er, Atomic Energy Project, effective July 1, 1955, at a
salary of $325 per month.

8. Reappointment of Willmar Tilden Berg as Laboratory Help-
er, Atomic Energy Project, effective July 1, 1955, at a
salary of $325 per month.

9. Reppointment of William Wallace South as Laboratory
Helper, Atomic Energy Project, effective July 1, 1955,
at a salary of $315 per month.

10. Reappointment of Richard T. Donovan as Laboratory Tech-
nician (student), Atomic Energy Project, effective July
1, 1955 at a salary of $280 per month for full-time
during the Summer months, and $93.33 per month during
the school year, for 1/3 time work.

11. Reappointment of Joseph John Mendive as Laboratory Tech-
nician (student), Atomic Energy Project, effective July
1, 1955 at a salary of $280 per month for full-time dur-
ing the Summer months and $93.33 per month during the
school year for 1/3 time work.

12. Appointment of Robert J. Morris of the Department of
Chemistry (supplementary contract) as Assistant Research
Chemist, Atomic Energy Project, for the months of August
1955 and June 1956, at a salary of $480 per month.

13. Appointment of H. Jerome Sein of the Department of Chem-
istry (supplementary contract) as Assistant Research
Chemist, Atomic Energy Project, for the months of Au-
gust 1955 and June 1956 at a salary of $425 per month.

14. Appointment of Lon S. Mc Girk, Jr. (supplementary con-
tract) as Assistant Research Mineralogist, Atomic
Energy Project, for the months of August 1955 and June
1956, at a salary of $432.50 per month.

15. Reappointment of John N. Butler as Project Engineer and
Research Metallurgist, Atomic Energy Project, effective
July 1, 1955, at a salary of $8100 for the year.

Food and Drug Control - Weights and Measures

1. Appointment of R. G. Neely as Inspector in Food and
Drugs, Weights and Measures, effective July 1, 1955 at
a salary of $3600 per year.

College of Education - Summer Session

1. Appointment of E. Allan Davis of the Department of
Mathematics to teach courses in Mathematics for the
period June 11 to June 24, 1955 at a total salary of
$340.

2. Appointment of Leon Dallin to teach a course in Music
for the period June 11 to June 24, 1955 at a total
salary of $300.

3. Appointment of Francis E. Bagley to teach a course in
Sociology for the period June 11 to June 24, 1955 at a
total salary of $250.

4. Appointment of Rachael W. De Angelo to teach a course in
Education for the period June 11 to June 24, 1955 at a
total salary of $400.

5. Appointment of Emma Birkmaier to teach courses in Edu-
cation for the period June 25 to August 5, 1955 at a
total salary of $900.

6. Appointment of Francois C. D'Artney to teach courses in
Education for the period June 25 to August 5, 1955 at
a total salary of $900.

7. Appointment of Henry Russell Sanders to be in charge of
football instruction and demonstration at the Coaching
Clinic for the period June 20 to 25, 1955 at a total
salary of $628.64.

8. Appointment of Henry P. Iba to be in charge of basket-
ball instruction and demonstration at the Coaching
Clinic for the period June 20 to June 25, 1955 at a
total salary of $768.78.

9. Appointment of John A. Manning to teach a course in
Speech for the period June 25 to August 5, 1955 at a
total salary of $350.

10. Appointment of Rosie Belle Diver to teach a course in
Physical Education for the period August 6 to August
19, 1955 at a total salary of $300.

11. Appointment of Gilbert Wrenn to teach a course in Educa-
tion for the period August 6 to August 19, 1955 at a
total salary of $500 for the period.

12. Appointment of Frances Dale Roberts as Supervising
Teacher in the Summer Elementary School for the period
June 25 to August 5, 1955 at a total salary of $600.

13. Appointment of Mrs. Eloyde Jones to teach a course in
Education for the period August 8 to August 19, 1955
at a total salary of $300.

Statewide Development Program of Higher Education

1. Appointment of John Patrick Kelly as Instructor and
Assistant Director of the Evening Division, effective
September 1, 1955, at a salary of $5000 for the 10
months period.

2. Appointment of Carmen S. Davis to teach a non-credit
course in "Real Estate Review" in the Reno Evening Di-
vision for the period June 13 to July 27, 1955, at a
total salary of $225.

3. Appointment of Gertrude Cunningham to teach a course
in Education in the Summer Session in Elko for the
period July 18 to August 5, 1955, at a total salary of
$450.

4. Appointment of Freda Joan Jensen to teach a course in
Education in the Summer Session in Elko for the period
June 27 to July 15, 1955 at a total salary of $450.

5. Appointment of Lyal W. Burkholder to teach a course in
Education in the Summer Session in Las Vegas for the
period June 13 to July 8, 1955 at a total salary of
$300.

6. Appointment of Lauren L. Brink to teach a course in
Education in the Summer Session in Las Vegas for the
period August 8 to August 19, 1955 at a total salary
of $300. (This is in addition to the contract approved
on June 6 for the same period.)

7. Cancellation of the contract with Frank E. Iddings
($300), which was approved on June 6, 1955, because of
insufficient enrollment; and payment of $50 to Mr.
Iddings for his services in teaching the course for
the few students who did enroll.

8. Cancellation of the contract with Selma E. Herr ($300),
which was approved on June 6, 1955. Dr. Herr was unable
to accept the assignment because of a commitment on the
University of California Campus.

9. Appointment of Mrs. Lee Pivornick as Instructor in
Foreign Languages in Las Vegas at a salary of $1800
for the academic year 1955-56.

10. Leave of absence for Effie Mona Mack, Associate Profes-
sor of History in Las Vegas, without pay, for the Fall
semester 1955.

Department Chairmen for the year 1955-56, as follows:

College of Arts and Science

Art - Edward W. Yates (Acting Chairman)
Biology - Ira La Rivers
Chemistry - Joe E. Moose
Economics, Business and Sociology - Committee of the
Whole
English - William R. Wood (Acting Chairman)
Foreign Languages - John R. Gottardi
Health, Physical Education and Athletics - George Broten
History and Political Science - Charles R. Hicks
Journalism - Alfred L. Higginbotham
Mathematics - E. Maurice Beesley
Military Science and Tactics - Lt. Col. Robert Bereuter
Music - Frederick Freeburne
Philosophy - Ralph A. Irwin
Physics - Sigmund W. Leifson
Psychology - Ralph A. Irwin
Speech and Drama - Robert S. Griffin

College of Education

Elementary Education - Roy Willey
Secondary Education - Burton C. Newbry
School Administration and Supervision - Garold Holstine

College of Engineering

Civil Engineering - H. B. Blodgett
Electrical Engineering - Stanley G. Palmer
Mechanical Engineering - J. R. Van Dyke

Max C. Fleischmann College of Agriculture

Agricultural Economics - John L. Fischer
Agricultural Education and Agricultural Mechanics -
Howard Christensen
Agricultural Chemistry - Walter F. Dye
Agronomy and Range Management - Joseph H. Robertson
Animal Husbandry - James F. Kidwell
Home Economics - Mildred Swift
Soils and Plant Nutrition - L. E. Dunn
Veterinary Science - Edwards Records

Mackay School of Mines

Geology-Geography - E. Richard Larson
Metallurgy - William I. Smyth
Mining - William I. Smyth

Motion by Mr. Hardy that the personnel recommendations be
approved, carried with Mr. Thompson not voting, and all
other Regents voting "aye".

The Board recessed as a Board of Regents and convened as a
Board of Control for the Agricultural Experiment Station to
consider the following personnel recommendations:

Board of Control - Agricultural Experiment Station

1. Appointment of Martin A. Townsend as Soils and Plants
Research Technician, 1/2 time in the Soils and Water
Testing Laboratory and 1/2 time in the Experiment Sta-
tion, effective August 15, 1955 at a salary rate of
$4500 for the year (see item #4, College of Agriculture
recommendations).

2. Reappointment of Walter H. Hesse as Assistant Professor
of Agronomy and Assistant Agronomist in the Agricultural
Experiment Station, effective July 1, 1955 at a salary
of $5400 for the year (see item #1, College of Agricul-
ture recommendations).

3. Appointment of John L. Fischer as Associate Professor of
Agriculture Economics and Associate Economist in the
Agricultural Experiment Station effective July 1, 1955
at a salary of $7700 for the year (see item #2, College
of Agriculture recommendations).

4. Appointment of Charles F. Bernhard as Assistant Agrono-
mist in the Agricultural Experiment Station to work in
Southern Nevada, effective July 1, 1955 at a salary of
$5100 for the year.

5. Appointment of Phillip Ternan as Graduate Research
Assistant in Animal Husbandry (1/2 time) effective
July 1, 1955 at a salary of $2000 for the year.

6. Appointment of E. Irving Hackett as Graduate Research
Assistant in Agronomy and Range Management (1/2 time)
effective July 10, 1955 at a salary of $2000 for the
year.

7. Appointment of Kenneth L. Kuttler as Associate Veter-
inarian, effective September 1, 1955 at a salary rate
of $7000 for the year.

Motion by Mr. Grant carried unanimously that the personnel
recommendations be approved.

The Board adjourned as a Board of Control for the Agricul-
tural Experiment Station and reconvened as a Board of Re-
gents.

The meeting adjourned at 3 P.M.