08/15/1959

UCCSN Board of Regents' Meeting Minutes
August 15-16, 1959




08-15-1959
Volume 8 - Pages 151-170

UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA
REGENTS MEETING
August 15, 1959

The Board of Regents met in Room 205, Morrill Hall, on Saturday,
August 15, 1959. Present: Regents Arnold, Broadbent, Germain,
Lombardi, Tyson; Comptroller Hayden, Academic Vice President
Wood, Engineer Rogers, President Armstrong. Mr. Porter repre-
sented the Office of the Attorney General. Mr. Barrett was
present as an observer from the Nevada Taxpayers' Association.
Reporters were Laxalt, Hulse and Nystedt. Regents Elwell and
Grant were out of the State.

The meeting was called to order at 9:50 A.M. by Vice Chairman
Lombardi.

1. Minutes of Previous Meeting

The minutes of the meeting of July 10-11, 1959 were approved
upon motion by Mr. Arnold, seconded by Mr. Broadbent and
unanimous vote.

2. Attorney General's Office

President Armstrong read a letter from Roger Foley, Attorney
General, which stated that, if it met with the approval of
the Regents, Mr. Porter would be designated to represent the
Office of the Attorney General at meetings of the Board of
Regents.

By consensus, the Regents approved and asked the Secretary
to notify Mr. Foley.

3. Comptroller's Claims

President Armstrong presented claims for approval as sub-
mitted by Comptroller Hayden.

Motion by Mr. Arnold, seconded by Mr. Broadbent, carried
unanimously that the claims be approved as follows:

Regents Checks, numbers 89-381 to 89-384 and 90-1 to
90-25 inclusive for a total of $425,651.35 for July.

State Claims, numbers 90-1001 to 90-1003 and 90-1 to
90-6 inclusive for a total of $248,369.45 for July.

4. Gifts

Gifts which had been received by the University were pre-
sented by the President for official acceptance by the
Board as follows:

Miscellaneous

From Mrs. Emil Fritsche, Reno - 14 volumes of English
and European Literature for the University Library.

From Clark J. Guild, Jr., Reno, through the Friends of
the University Library - $5 in memorium of Gaston
Uhalde.

From Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Griffen, Reno - copy of the
book, "Some Lesser Known Architecture of London", given
to the University Library in memory of Russell Mills.

From Thomas E. Buckman, Reno - a Catalog of an Exhibi-
tion Commemorating the 250th Anniversary of the Birth
of Carolus Linnaeus 1707-1957 compiled by his son,
Thomas R. Buckman, and "Linnaeus" by Arvid H. Uggla,
for the University Library.

From the International Harvester Company, Oakland,
California - SD-240 engine for use in the mechanical
teaching program of the College of Engineering.

From Beta Sigma Phi City Council of Las Vegas - $280
for the Journalism Department of Nevada Southern
Regional Division in honor of the late Mr. Charles P.
Squires and Mrs. Squires, pioneer residents of Las
Vegas who were active in the field of Journalism.

From the Estate of Wesley Elgin Travis - $69,522 as the
first installment from Trust No. 2 of the Travis Estate.

From Vern Waldo, Reno - turf, in excellent condition,
from his yard.

Scholarships

From the Colonial Hotel Company, Reno - payment of $60
for the C. E. Clough Scholarship in Civil Engineering.

From the Reno Lions Club Auxiliary - $50 to be used as
a scholarship in Speech Therapy.

From the Insurance Women of Reno, an affiliation of the
National Insurance Women - $250 to be used as a scholar-
ship for a Sophomore student in the Orvis School of
Nursing studying to qualify as a professional nurse.

From the First National Bank of Nevada, Minden Branch -
$175 representing the annual Douglas County High School
Memorial Scholarship Award.

From the Pershing County Chamber of Commerce, Lovelock -
establishment of a special one-time-only scholarship to
be known as the Pershing County Chamber of Commerce
Scholarship in the amount of $100 and to be awarded to
an Indian student attending the University of Nevada
and a resident of Pershing County.

From the Estate of Alma M. Holmshaw - $750 for the
Holmshaw Scholarship Fund.

Motion by Mr. Arnold, seconded by Mr. Germain, carried
unanimously that the gifts be accepted and that the Secre-
tary write an appropriate note of thanks to each donor.

5. Personnel Recommendations

President Armstrong presented the personnel recommendations
as follows:

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

Appointments as follows:

William Knox Sonnemann, Jr., as Specialist in Agricul-
tural Information, effective July 13, 1959 at an annual
salary rate of $6500 based on 12 months service (re-
placement for Jerry Robinson).

Richard Gifford as Assistant Soils Research Physicist
and Assistant Professor effective October 1, 1959 at
an annual salary rate of $7300 based on 12 months serv-
ice (replacing William C. Bianchi).

Eldon E. Moore as Assistant Agricultural Agent for
Ormsby, Douglas and Storey Counties effective July 15,
1959 at a salary rate of $5650 based on 12 months
service (new position contingent upon continuation of
Federal Indian Funds).

W. Darrell Foote as Assistant Professor and Assistant
Animal Husbandman, effective August 20, 1959 at an
annual salary rate of $7300 based on 12 months service
(replacement for James Kidwell).

Helen Baker Reyburn as Graduate Assistant in Home
Economics at a salary of $1200 for the academic year
1959-60 (new position).

Joe Nicholas as Assistant in Research, Equipment and
Farm Service, effective July 1, 1959 at an annual salary
of $4100 based on 12 months service (replacement for
Joseph Lash).

Lemoyne J. Weirich as Assistant in Research, Equipment
and Farm Service, effective July 1, 1959 at a salary of
$4450 based on 12 months service (replacement for David
C. De Vore).

John M. Connor as Research Assistant in Agronomy and
Range Management for July and August 1959 at a salary
of $366.66 per month.

Change in Status as follows:

Rollie Weaver from Assistant Agricultural Agent in
Churchill County to Assistant County Agent in Washoe
County at an annual salary of $6400 based on 12 months
service, effective July 1, 1959 (replacement for Miller
T. Hunter).

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCE

Appointments as follows:

Dianna Marcella Vanni as Graduate Assistant in Biology
at a salary of $1800 for the academic year 1959-60 (new
position).

John Gregg Folkes as Graduate Assistant in History and
Political Science at a salary of $1800 for the academic
year 1959-60 (new position).

Harold Goddard as Assistant Professor of Music at a
salary of $6500 for the academic year 1959-60 (replace-
ment for Robert Perry).

Samuel Franklin Eccles as Assistant Professor of Physics
effective November 1, 1959 at a salary of $5600 for the
8 months ending June 30, 1960 (replacement for T. V.
Frazier, on leave).

Jerry Lewis Morrison as Graduate Assistant in Physics
at a salary of $1800 for the academic year 1959-60 (new
position).

Roland Terry Ellmore as Instructor in Speech and Drama
at a salary of $3500 for the academic year 1959-60 (new
position).

MACKAY SCHOOL OF MINES

Appointments as follows:

Barbara A. Hamilton as Scientific Illustrator and
Photographer for the Nevada Bureau of Mines, effective
July 6, 1959 at a salary rate of $4500 based on 12
months service (new position).

Bernard O. Lane as Lecturer in Geology-Geography at a
salary of $6600 for the academic year 1959-60 (replace-
ment for Joseph Lintz, on leave).

Robert F. Schryver as Graduate Assistant in Geology-
Geography at a salary of $1800 for the academic year
1959-60 (new position).

Joseph N. Swinderman as Graduate Assistant in Geology-
Geography at a salary of $1800 for the academic year
1959-60 (replacement for Louis Bortz).

NEVADA SOUTHERN REGIONAL DIVISION

Appointments for the Fall Semester 1959 Evening Division
as follows:

Jeanmarie Burnham as Lecturer in Sociology - $225
Charles H. Miles, Jr. as Lecturer in Business Law -
$337.50
Irving Lazar as Lecturer in Psychology - $525
Sidney S. Saltzman as Lecturer in Philosophy - $337.50

Resignation as follows:

Hugh Smithwick as Associate Professor of Health and
Physical Education effective immediately (Mr. Smithwick
is now on leave).

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Appointments as follows:

Robert G. Whittemore, Jr. as Lecturer in Education ef-
fective August 1, 1959, at an annual salary of $7500
based on 12 months service (replacement for Burton
Newbry, on leave).

Anne Elgean Orluck as Visiting Lecturer in Education,
Post Summer Session 1959 - $300

LIBRARY

Appointments as follows:

Richard M. Palcanis as Serials Librarian in the Uni-
versity Library effective September 14, 1959, at an
annual salary rate of $6000 based on 12 months service
(new position).

John D. Horgan as Assistant Loan Librarian at a salary
of $4500 for the academic year 1959-60 (new position).

Martin Herman Dickstein as Assistant Catalog Librarian
in the University Library effective September 14, 1959,
at an annual salary rate of $5600 based on 12 months
service (replacement for Gail Shields).

STATEWIDE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM OF HIGHER EDUCATION

Appointments as follows:

James Hoyt to teach Accounting in the Off-Campus Summer
Session 1959 - $500 (Stead Air Force Base)
Thomas James Leonard to teach Political Science in the
Off-Campus Summer Session 1959 - $450 plus $100 to
defray travel costs from Minnesota (Elko)
Dale M. Robison to teach Accounting in the Evening
Division 1959 - $400 (Hawthorne)

Grace M. Donehower as Technical Assistant in the State-
wide Development Program at a salary of $4400 based on
12 months service, effective July 1, 1959 (replacement
for Mary Frazier).

ASUN

Approval of contracts as follows:

James Mc Nabney as Graduate Manager and Manager of the
ASUN Bookstore at a salary of $7900 based on 12 months
service for the year beginning July 1, 1959.

Trinie Erquiaga as Secretary-Bookkeeper to the Graduate
Manager and ASUN Bookstore at a salary of $4800 based on
12 months service for the year beginning July 1, 1959.

Daniel Sobrio as ASUN President at a salary of $720 for
the academic year 1959-60.

Sue Dea Pinneo as ASUN Secretary at a salary of $540
for the academic year 1959-60.

Motion by Mr. Arnold, seconded by Mr. Broadbent, carried
unanimously that the personnel recommendations be approved.

6. Investment Committee

As directed by the Board at its meeting on April 11, 1959,
the Vice Chairman appointed an Advisory Committee on Invest-
ments, consisting of Dr. Lombardi, Mr. Crumley, President
Armstrong and Mr. Hayden.

This Committee secured assistance of Mr. E. J. Questa and
Mr. J. Bergen, holding several meetings in which the Uni-
versity portfolio was studied. As a result of a meeting
July 20, recommendations were made by advisers Questa and
Bergen of the sale of certain securities, redemption of cer-
tain bonds and reinvestment of certain securities. By tele-
phone poll, President Armstrong received affirmative votes
from Regents Anderson, Arnold, Broadbent, Crumley, Elwell,
Germain, Lombardi, Tyson, and the following resolution was
prepared and delivered to the First National Bank as author-
ity to proceed:

RESOLUTION # 59-8

BE IT RESOLVED, that the Board of Regents of the Univer-
sity of Nevada hereby authorizes collection of the fol-
lowing matured savings bonds and sale of the following
securities by the First National Bank of Nevada:

COLLECT MATURED SAVINGS BONDS:

Series G, due 8/56 $12,000.00
Series G, due 3/57 3,000.00
Series G, due 8/57 4,000.00
Series G, due 2/58 500.00
Series G, due 1/59 20,000.00

SHARES ISSUE VALUE

255 United Fruit $ 8,574.38
20 Callahan Mining 127.50
5,000 Combined Metals 250.00
160 Idaho Maryland Mines 113.60
5,000 Prince Consolidated Mining 300.00
2,661 Mesabi Iron 59,796.00
2,400 American Cable & Radio 25,200.00
5.76 Edek Corp. (accept offer in
liquidation) 86.40
1,728 Western Union 63,720.00

NEGOTIATE SALE IF POSSIBLE
ESTIMATED
SHARES ISSUE VALUE

1,250 Clay Peters Building $65,000.00
40 Colonial Hotel 4,000.00

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that L. E. Lombardi, Vice Chair-
man of the Board of Regents, be authorized to endorse
the above securities for sales and collection, on behalf
of the Board of Regents of the University of Nevada.

The 3 local banks were asked to submit an estimate of their
charge for management of the University portfolio. Answers
were received as follows:

First National Bank of Nevada

Acceptance or Setting-Up Fee
Non-Recurring Charge $ 200.00
Annual Payment 1,800.00

Nevada Bank of Commerce

Acceptance Fee $ 3,325.00
Annual Fee 8,310.00
Revocation Fee 16,620.00

The Security National Bank

Acceptance Fee 1/20 of 1% of the current
reasonable market value of
the securities or other
property deposited.
Annual Fee 1/4 of 1% of the current
reasonable market value of
the securities or other
property under management.

Recommendation of the Investment Committee was that the of-
fer of the First National Bank of Nevada be accepted.

Motion by Mr. Arnold, seconded by Mr. Broadbent, carried
unanimously that arrangements be made with First National
Bank of Nevada for management of the endowment funds on
the terms proposed above; that the Investment Committee
be authorized to manage the funds in cooperation with the
bank; and that the Comptroller be authorized to turn over
to the bank all securities and holdings of the University
for custodianship.

7. Ladino Dairy

Mr. Hayden reported that in another week the University
should receive the appraisers' reports and all the require-
ments set by the Attorney General will then have been ful-
filled. The information from the appraisers will be for-
warded to the Attorney General so that papers can be drawn
for sale of the Ladino Dairy.

8. Legislation

In order to try to cover the field of proposed legislation,
President Armstrong sent a memorandum to the Deans asking
them to submit items which should be considered for possible
legislation. Suggestions were made as follows:

(a) Investments - Request the Legislature to spell out the
intent of the State Constitution in regard to invest-
ment of funds. Mr. Porter recommended that this legis-
lation not be sought in view of the recent ruling by
Judge Priest that the University already has such
authority.

(b) Social Security for University Employees - Legislation
was prepared for the last session but was not introduc-
ed on advice of the Legislature because it would open
the door for all State employees to request participa-
tion.

Motion by Mr. Tyson, seconded by Mr. Germain, carried
unanimously that a bill be drafted to permit the
employees of the University to particpate in Social
Security.

(c) Prior Service Consideration - Dean Holstine requested
that service credit for the retirement program be al-
lowed for service in other states. If the State of
Nevada had a reciprocity agreement, service up to per-
haps 10 years could be applied on retirement under the
Nevada State System. The Regents requested that Pres-
ident Armstrong discuss this matter with Mr. Kenneth
Buck of the State Retirement Board.

(d) WICHE - The legislation which approved participation in
the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education
provided that anyone certified under WICHE for educa-
tion in medicine, dentistry or veterinary medicine must
either repay the State or practice for a 6-year period
in a Nevada town of less than 3000 population. Presi-
dent Armstrong urged that the repayment provision be
removed. It was agreed that this should be taken up
first with the Nevada WICHE Commissioners and then
presented to the Board of Regents.

(e) Compulsory Retirement of Classified Personnel - A bill
providing for compulsory retirement of classified per-
sonnel at age 70 passed the Legislature last session
but was recalled and buried in committee. Since it was
felt that the State Personnel Department might request
similar legislation at the coming session Dr. Armstrong
was asked to write to the State Personnel Department
inquiring if that agency contemplates any such legis-
lation.

(f) Authority to Issue Bonds for Construction of Buildings
- Legislation was not introduced at the last session on
the advice of leaders in the Legislature because the
bonding capacity of the State had not been reached.
Advice of Mr. Porter now was that this legislation
should wait until 1961, and the Board agreed informal-
ly.

(g) Student Fees for Construction Purposes - Dr. Wood pro-
posed that student fees be set aside for construction
purposes so that, at the end of the next 2 years, the
University would be able to keep the building program
going on its own. Mr. Porter advised asking the ap-
proval of the State Board of Examiners and foresaw no
difficulty if the Legislature approves and replaces
in the University appropriation a sum equal to the
student fees.

(h) Study of the Relationship of the University to State
Control Units - State Personnel Department, State
Planning Board and State Purchasing Agent. This was
discussed only.

9. Permanent Endowment Plan

President Armstrong read and discussed his proposal for a
long-range capital gifts program, as follows:

August 15, 1959

To Members of the Board of Regents:

Following my preliminary presentation to you at our meeting
on July 10, 1959 of my suggestions for a long-range capital
gifts program, or a permanent endowment fund drive, this
outline has been prepared for your consideration.

The philosophical and factual basis for my recommendation
that we undertake such a program is set forth in the address
which I made last June to the Nevada State Bankers' Conven-
tion, entitled "The Role of the University in Our Economy",
copies of which have already been distributed to you. A
brief recapitulation of the basic considerations follows:

1. The most conservative estimates show that by 1965 the
present enrollment of the University can be doubled,
and by 1972 more than tripled.

2. It would be highly undesirable for the University to be
forced, due to lack of adequate financial resources,
to restrict the enrollment of qualified Nevada students.

3. As the only institution of higher learning in the State,
the University has a unique obligation to all citizens -
not only in programs of resident instruction, Off-Campus
and Evening Division, Correspondence Courses, etc. - but
also through its public service and research facilities,
which serve and strengthen the economy of the whole
State.

4. An educational, public service and research program of
the magnitude and quality justified by the needs of the
years immediately ahead will be increasingly expensive,
yet I believe that it is indispensable if the State is
to grow and develop as it should.

5. The financing of such a program will require substantial
support beyond what we may reasonably expect from State
appropriations or student fees. The needs of the Uni-
versity are growing more rapidly than the foreseeable
resources of the State in tax funds to meet those needs.

6. The very large increase in student fees which would be
necessary to provide any substantial part of the desired
additional income would be unwise and contrary to the
entire philosophy of state-supported Universities.

7. Private philanthropy, through individuals and business
and industry, is the only remaining source of support
in the magnitude required.

8. Adequate financing of such a total program of the Uni-
versity can make it one of the best, most distinguished,
most progressive and most productive institutions in
the country.

I recommend, therefore, that we undertake immediately a Per-
manent Endowment-Capital Gifts Program designed to raise at
least $15,000,000 by 1964, the Centennial of the Constitu-
tional provision of the State of Nevada which authorized
the establishment of the University.

I.

The income from the Permanent Endowment Fund (which we may
reasonably expect to approximate 5% annually, now that the
Regents have full authority to manage the investments of
the University to the best advantage) would be used to sup-
plement other income, and could be designated for the sup-
port of such important projects (although not necessarily
limited to these) as the following:

1. Distinguished Professorships Income from $2,000,000

Increments of $5000 or more per year would be added to
the base salary of a certain number of professorships
to raise them to levels sufficient to bring outstand-
ing individuals to the faculty. These distinguished
professorships will in turn help to attract other lead-
ing scholars to the University and enable us to develop
a truly outstanding faculty.

2. Visiting Distinguished Income from $1,000,000
Professors

To bring a few of the world's leading thinkers and
scholars to the Campus each year to supplement and
stimulate the work of the regular faculty.

3. Graduate Fellowships and Income from $1,000,000
Assistantships

To add depth and strength to our present graduate
instructional and research programs. These will become
of crucial importance as we begin the development of
doctoral programs.

4. Faculty Advanced Study and Income from $1,000,000
Travel Fund

To provide adequate financial support for the encour-
agement of professional improvement of faculty through
advanced study during Summers, etc., and in frequent
participation in professional meetings.

5. A University Press Income from $1,000,000

To provide a vehicle for regular publication of faculty
writing and research, which in turn will stimulate
scholarly productivity.

6. Desert Research Institute Income from $1,000,000
Permanent Fund

To stabilize the operation of the Institute without the
necessity of depending entirely upon research grants,
which will fluctuate from year to year.

7. Special Research Projects Fund Income from $1,000,000

To underwrite research projects in fields of special
or particular importance to Nevada.

8. Library Book Fund Income from $1,500,000

To supplement legislative appropriations for books and
to strengthen our Library collection in areas of spe-
cial, unusual or particularly expensive needs.

9. Special Equipment Fund Income from $2,000,000

For the purchase of large or specialized items of
teaching or research equipment, particularly of a
nature which because of cost or other factors would
be difficult to obtain by legislative appropriation.

10. Student Grants-in-Aid Fund Income from $2,000,000

To provide scholarships or grants-in-aid for worthy and
financially needy students who have particular talents
in various fields. Such a fund will become increasing-
ly important as enrollments grow heavily.

11. Lectures, Concerts and Exhibits Income from $ 500,000
Fund

To provide adequate financing of these important ad-
juncts to our educational and public service programs.

12. Regents Discretionary Fund Income from $1,000,000

For unanticipated contingencies and special University
needs.

Total Permanent Endowment Fund $15,000,000

II.

In addition to the Permanent Endowment Fund described above,
we should also keep in mind the importance of specific Capi-
tal Gifts. A wide variety of such gifts is possible, and
any one of them would constitute an enduring memorial to the
donor or his designate.

1. The most tangible and impressive memorials are in the
form of buildings. We know that the University's
building needs on both Campuses will increase tremen-
dously in the next 10 years, probably considerably
beyond the capacity of the State to finance them. A
recapitulation even of those buildings for which the
need is already clear illustrates this fact forcibly:

a. Central Heating Plant
b. Engineering Building
c. Science and Technology Building (Las Vegas)
d. Life Science Building
e. Social Science Building
f. Home Management Residence
g. Dormitory and Dining Facility (Las Vegas)
h. Physical Science Building
i. Student Infirmary
j. Library Building (Las Vegas)
k. Fine Arts Building (Las Vegas)
l. School of Nursing Building
m. Men's Physical Education and ROTC Building
n. Relocation of Mackay Stadium
o. Desert Research Institute Center

2. Capital Gifts to endow distinguished professorships
(to be named for the donors or their designates) or
special Library book funds (to be similarly named and
indicated in the book plates) in the areas of the
donors' interests, could supplement or even replace
the same items listed under the Permanent Endowment
Fund.

3. Other areas of importance for capital gifts are sug-
gested by the following:

a. The furnishing and equipping of a student room or
rooms in new dormitories as they are built. The
donor is identified by a permanent plaque in the
room.

b. Similarly, the furnishing and equipping of lounges
or recreation rooms in the dormitories.

c. Special teaching and research equipment (cf. Item 9
in I. above) as illustrated by some of our current
needs, not likely to be met by legislative appro-
priation:

Educational Television Equipment up to $100,000
Nuclear Reactor at least 100,000
Electronic Computer 60,000
Musical Instruments for the Band 20,000
Pianos 15,000
Organ for Fine Arts Building 25,000

III.

In such a Permanent Endowment-Capital Gifts Program, it
should be our constant objective to obtain from the donors
maximum discretion in the management of the funds by the
Board of Regents. The most useful of all gifts are those
which are as little restricted as possible, in which the
donor leaves to the good judgment of the governing board
the decisions as to the most fruitful and productive uses
of the income. This is particularly important because of
the changing needs of the University from year to year.
Nobody today can accurately estimate what the University's
needs may be 50 or even 20 years from now. On the other
hand, we must recognize that some donors will wish to re-
strict their gifts to certain special or general purposes
within the University. This can still be accomplished
without the undesirable aspects of too great restriction
by their designating, for example, that the income is to
be used for the improvement of faculty salaries, or for
the purchase of educational or research equipment, or of
any of the general purposes listed above.

No more splendid or enduring memorial can be achieved than
by a wise gift for capital purposes to an educational insti-
tution. This is the kind of immortality that many individu-
als would like to attain, because they know that their gifts
will go on producing benefit for future generations of young
men and women.

IV.

If the program here proposed is approved, then I recommend
that we move into its implementation as rapidly as possible
in general accordance with the following suggested proce-
dures:

1. Ours is essentially a long-range plan calling for a
sustained and steady effort over a period of time. In
my opinion, however, it is not one which needs high
pressure tactics or professional fund-raisers, nor do
I think that such a campaign would win the acceptance
we desire.

2. Instead, I propose that appropriate University officers
particularly the President together with members of the
Board of Regents take the lead in organizing a rather
large Development Committee of Volunteer Friends of the
University, consisting of influential leaders in the
business and professional communities of the State, to
work with us in the solicitation of gifts. In the
final analysis, all successful fund-raising programs
have depended upon the quality and devotion of the ef-
forts of volunteer workers, non-professionals who sin-
cerely believe in the importance of the objectives of
the program and are willing to devote a reasonable
amount of time to their accomplishment. We might well
look to some of the members of our Citizens' Advisory
Committees for this cooperation, and, in fact, at
least two of these Committees have already gone on
record to pledge support for a program of this kind.

3. Two groups whose cooperation will be of crucial im-
portance are the attorneys and bank officers, particu-
larly trust officers, because of their relationship
to wills, bequests, trusts and tax advice. We should
immediately undertake to enlist their support through
personal contacts and discussions, providing them full
information on the University's needs and interests.

4. An attractive and appropriate brochure - perhaps a
series of brochures - dealing with specific aspects
of the program should be prepared, as a means of set-
ting forth the program in considerable detail, with
sections describing the tax and inheritance benefits
of various kinds of gifts to the University. Such a
brochure or brochures will be invaluable tools for
our cooperating volunteers, as well as informational
pieces for prospective donors.

5. Finally, I believe it is of the utmost importance that
the entire program be coordinated through the office
of the President, to provide centralized direction and
supervision, so that we may avoid conflict, duplication
or dissipation of effort, and so that the Regents may
be kept continuously and consistently informed of all
aspects of the progress of the program.

Respectfully submitted,

Charles J. Armstrong
President

Motion by Mr. Tyson, seconded by Mr. Broadbent, carried
unanimously that the Regents approve the plan in principle
and authorize the President to implement it in line with
his report, and that the Chair appoint a small committee
of the Board to work with the President.

Vice Chairman Lombardi appointed Regents Germain and Tyson.

10. Radiological Laboratory

Under date of June 29, 1959, Dean Carlson wrote to Presi-
dent Armstrong giving details of a conference with Mr.
Andrew Ruckman, Managing Director of the Southern Nevada
Industrial Foundation. Mr. Ruckman had been in touch with
Senators Bible and Cannon and confirmed the fact that it
seems likely that a second Radiological Laboratory will be
established in the western part of the United States to
serve the states west of the Mississippi River. In con-
ference with officials of the Public Health Service, Dr.
Armstrong learned that the Radiological Laboratory serving
this area would have as its primary service the testing of
milk, water and bone samples. Facilities needed would con-
sist of (1) Radiological Laboratory, (2) Counting Room,
(3) Office Space. These quarters would be leased from the
University. On the basis of the correspondence and these
conferences, the University expressed to the U. S. Public
Health Service a desire to explore further the possibility
of providing these facilities on the Las Vegas Campus. A
favorable reply was received from the Surgeon General for
further exploration.

Advantages to the University would be:

1) Aid in development in the field of Science.

2) Advance the University's ability to get into radiologi-
cal work. The government will provide highly expensive
equipment which would be available to faculty and to a
limited extent to students.

3) There would be available from the Public Health Service
a considerable specialized scientific talent to assist
in giving guest lectures or to assist in the development
of courses.

4) The facilities that would be available to Nevada South-
ern University would be unique. Few western Univer-
sities have access to such fine facilities except
California.

5) It might be possible to provide some part-time or Sum-
mer employment for a limited number of students and/or
Professors.

6) It would be much simpler to participate in research con-
tracts with the government if the University were al-
ready cooperating in this project.

7) It might make it easier to secure staff members if the
University has facilities of this type.

President Armstrong recommended that the Regents approve all
feasible participation.

Motion by Mr. Arnold, seconded by Mr. Germain, carried
unanimously that the Regents approve actions taken so far
in making approaches to the Public Health Service, and
authorize the President to proceed with negotiations sub-
ject to approval by the Board.

The meeting recessed at 12:10 noon for luncheon.

The recessed meeting was called to order at 1:50 P.M. by Vice
Chairman Lombardi with all present who were present in the morn-
ing session, and also with Regents Anderson and Crumley in at-
tendance.

11. Faculty Prizes

Action of the Board of Regents August 17, 1957 offered
prizes for the 6 best plans to improve efficiency and ef-
fectiveness of the teaching program. Only 1 member of the
faculty has submitted a plan so far and it is being reviewed
by a special committee. Since the original plan did not
carry a deadline, President Armstrong asked the Regents now
to make the offer more specific.

Motion by Mr. Arnold, seconded by Mr. Tyson, carried unani-
mously to extend the program for another 2 years offering
6 prizes of $1000 each, and that the faculty be so informed.

12. Building Program

Dr. Anderson, Chairman of the Regents Building Committee,
reported. The Building Committee was instructed to con-
sider the possible variations, plus the original site, for
the Library building. On July 16 the Committee met with
the Administration of the University; minutes of the meet-
ing are as follows:

Minutes of the Meeting of the Building Committee of the
Board of Regents with the Architects for the New Library
Building and Representatives of the State Planning Board.

1. The meeting was held on July 16, 1959, beginning at 8
P.M., in the office of the President of the University.
Present were Dr. Fred Anderson, Chairman; Mr. Arnold,
Dr. Lombardi, Mr. Tyson, members Regents Building Com-
mittee; Architects Alexander and Vhay; Mr. Isbell, Mr.
Thompson, Mr. Fitts, Mr. Bissell representing the State
Planning Board; Mr. Rogers, University Engineer; and
President Armstrong.

2. Dr. Anderson presided. In response to the request made
by the Board of Regents in their meeting on July 10,
1959, the architects presented a written supplementary
report concerning the proposed plans for the Library
building, together with a photograph of the model and
various plans and sketches. A copy of this material
is attached to the original of these minutes. The
particular purpose of the re-study was the question
of possible re-orientation of the building, modifica-
tion of interior arrangements, the consideration of
the possibility of a 4-story building instead of a 3,
and the decorative arcade.

3. Mr. Vhay led a discussion of the various aspects of
the report and provided considerable additional detail.
There followed extensive discussion of the problems
which would be occasioned by the re-orientation of the
building. For example, it was brought out that re-
orientation of the building to a north-south axis would
not permit the present north-south Campus road to con-
tinue to the north to any extent beyond the building,
because of the fact that with such a re-orientation
the road would encounter the fence of the present
Stadium immediately upon passing the northeast end
of the Library building. It was also brought out
that future expansion of the rotated building would
be much more difficult and expensive and would result
in an increased elimination of parking area.

4. Considerable discussion followed, concerning the height
of the building and various problems occasioned by a
4-story treatment.

5. A third area of discussion concerned access to the con-
ference rooms, and a discussion of the feature incor-
porated by the architects, which would permit the use
of 6 temporary classrooms in the reference reading area
until such time as the full development of the Library
Program requires the complete use of all Library facil-
ities.

6. A motion was made by Mr. Arnold, seconded by Mr. Tyson,
that the Building Committee of the Board of Regents ap-
prove the proposed site and orientation of the Library
building, as in site plan A, originally submitted by
the architects. Unanimously approved.

7. A motion was made by Mr. Arnold, seconded by Dr.
Lombardi, that the Committee approve plans for a 3-
story building, as submitted in the original proposal
of the architects. Unanimously approved.

8. A motion was made by Mr. Arnold, seconded by Mr. Tyson,
that the Committee express its satisfaction with the
plans as originally proposed with reference to the
arrangement of and access to conference rooms. Unani-
mously approved.

9. Then there followed extensive discussion concerning
the proposed arcade extending to the east of the
Library building, connecting it with the quadrangle.
The various reasons for its retention as proposed by
the architects were thoroughly investigated and dis-
cussed. Although it was agreed that the arcade as
now contemplated performs a function which is primari-
ly decorative, it is still true that the arcade serves
the function of providing access to the Library from
the east and from the quadrangle.

10. Motion was made by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr.
Arnold, that after careful study of the architects'
supplementary report, with particular reference to
the arcade and the subsequent modifications which
would provide a new ramp also from the west, and a
new elevation of the building as a whole, this program
be approved by the Building Committee of the Board of
Regents as constituting the best total plan for the
Library. Unanimously approved. In addition, at Dr.
Anderson's suggestion, the other individuals present
were asked to express an opinion on this motion, and
all voted unanimously in favor of it.

11. Mr. Bissell then presented the proposed schedule of
the Planning Board for the 1960-61 capital program of
the State, and indicated that the Board of Regents
should be ready to submit recommendations concerning
the University Building Program at a meeting of the
Planning Board on August 20, 1959. Mr. Bissell urged
that the University ask the Legislature for funds of
approximately $150,000 for professional assistance in
developing a master plan for the University, including
a space utilization study and a building site plan,
to be correlated with an educational master plan to
be developed by the University.

12. The next meeting of the Building Committee of the Re-
gents was set for Thursday evening, July 23, at 8 P.M.
in the office of the President, to discuss the proposed
Building Program for the University.

Respectfully submitted,

Charles J. Armstrong
Acting Secretary

Dr. Anderson also reported on an informal meeting which the
Committee held with members of the State Planning Board in
Mr. Isbell's office on July 30 to discuss the plans for the
Library building, among other things. Plans for the Library
building had been signed by Mr. Isbell, but later he revers-
ed his stand and asked for this meeting with the Building
Committee. As a result of the meeting, Mr. Isbell re-signed
the plans.

Dr. Anderson read the minutes of the meeting of the Building
Committee held on July 23, 1959, as follows:

Minutes of the Meeting of the Building Committee of the
Board of Regents July 23, 1959.

1. The meeting was held in Room 205, Morrill Hall, at
8:30 P.M. The following were present: Dr. Anderson,
Chairman; Mr. Arnold, Mr. Crumley, Dr. Lombardi, Mr.
Tyson, members of the Committee; Mr. Rogers and Presi-
dent Armstrong. Dr. Anderson presided. Main item of
business was discussion and analysis of a proposed
priority list (prepared by Dr. Wood and Mr. Rogers)
for the 1960-61 Capital Improvement Program of the
University on both Campuses.

2. The Student Union building addition was eliminated
from the list in view of the fact that the second
bequest from the Jot Travis Estate will soon become
available to the Regents, which can be used to pro-
vide funds for the proposed addition to the Student
Union. Then there followed discussion as to the most
suitable plan for provision of a Student Health Facili-
ty and it appeared that the most practical method would
be to add this as a third floor to the Student Union
building addition and to seek State funds for this
project.

3. A motion was made by Mr. Arnold, seconded by Dr.
Lombardi, that the Student Health Facility be planned
as a third floor addition to the Student Union build-
ing addition and that State funds be sought for its
planning and construction in the 1960-61 program.
Unanimously approved.

4. A motion was made by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr.
Arnold, that the University should request an appro-
priate sum for a structural survey of Morrill Hall
to determine what may be necessary for the preserva-
tion of the building as a historical monument for
limited use. Approved unanimously. Mr. Rogers will
investigate and recommend an appropriate sum.

5. After further discussion of priorities, it was agreed
to list priorities for the Reno Campus and for the
Las Vegas Campus separately, as follows:

Reno Campus

1. Central Heating Plant (construction funds)
2. Engineering Building (construction funds)
3. Social Science Classroom Building (construction
funds)
4. Physical Science Building (construction funds)
5. Student Health Facility (construction funds)
6. Utilities, Walks and Parking (construction funds)
7. Landscaping (construction funds)
8. Men's Physical Education and ROTC Building (plan-
ning funds)
9. Life Science Addition to Max C. Fleischmann
Building (construction funds)
10. Remodel Old Agricultural Building (planning funds)
11. Home Management Residence (planning funds)
12. School of Nursing Building (planning funds)

Las Vegas Campus

1. Science and Technology Building (construction
funds)
2. Land Acquisition (construction funds)
3. Utilities, Walks and Parking (construction funds)
4. Landscaping (construction funds)
5. Library Building (construction funds)
6. Fine Arts Building (planning funds)
7. Dormitory and Dining Facility (planning funds)

6. The Dormitory and Dining Facility was placed at the end
of the list for the Las Vegas Campus because of the
Committee's belief that classroom and academic facili-
ties are more important in the immediate future for the
development of the Las Vegas Campus than would be a
dormitory or dining facility, particularly in view of
the desire that Nevada Southern may reach accreditation
status as a 4-year institution at the earliest possible
date.

7. Discussion then turned to the suggesion made at the
last meeting of the Committee by Mr. Bissell that the
University consider requesting money for a master plan
of the Campus, including a space-utilization study,
building site plans and aerial survey of the Campus,
contour map, etc. Mr. Rogers displayed and discussed
existing maps of the various utility systems of the
Campus, the contours, the site plans and a general
master plan. Mr. Rogers also pointed out that we now
have full contour maps of the Reno Campus, with the
exception of a small unsurveyed area north of the
Federal Bureau of Mines.

8. A motion was made by Mr. Arnold, seconded by Dr.
Lombardi, that the Campus Development Committee be
requested to study the master plan of the Campus and
make recommendations for future allocation of various
areas and functions, although not necessarily the
actual building sites, and that the Committee transmit
its recommendations to the Regents through the Presi-
dent. Unanimously approved.

9. A motion was made by Mr. Crumley, seconded by Dr.
Lombardi, that the University request in the next
legislative session appropriate funds for aerial sur-
veys of all University properties in the State, with
the understanding that contour maps are to be made
from the surveys. Unanimously approved.

10. It is further agreed that the master plan of the Cam-
pus, its utility distribution systems, contours and
projections of building sites, together with alloca-
tion of areas and functions, is already in progress
and will proceed continuously under the direction of
the Regents through the Administration and faculty
and the Campus Development Committee.

11. A motion was made by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr.
Arnold, that the Committee recommend to the Regents
at their next meeting that Center Street should be
renamed University Avenue and that such a request
be forwarded to the City Council. Unanimously ap-
proved.

12. Mr. Rogers was requested to obtain cost estimates for
those items of the Capital Improvement Program which
have not already been supplied, and to have them
available for the August 15 meeting of the Regents.

Respectfully submitted,

Charles J. Armstrong
President

(a) Referring to paragraph 11, minutes of meeting of July
23, 1959, motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Dr.
Anderson, carried unanimously that a request be for-
warded to the Reno City Council that Center Street be
renamed University Avenue.

(b) Referring to paragraph 4, minutes of meeting of July
23, 1959, motion by Mr. Arnold, seconded by Mr. Germain
and carried unanimously, that a sum yet to be deter-
mined be requested for a structural survey of Morrill
Hall and that it be included in the priority list of
building projects to be submitted to the State Planning
Board.

(c) Referring to paragraph 3, minutes of meeting of July
23, 1959, motion by Dr. Anderson, seconded by Mr.
Arnold, carried unanimously that a sum be included in
our request to the Legislature equal to the money at
present and in the near future to come from the Travis
Estate as matching funds, with the intention of includ-
ing the Student Health Facility in our priority list
with a 1-step higher priority, the exact sum to be
supplied by President Armstrong before submission to
the Planning Board.

(d) Referring to paragraph 9, minutes of meeting of July
23, 1959, motion by Dr. Anderson, seconded by Mr.
Arnold, carried unanimously that for the present an
aerial survey be made of all University properties
within the State and that contour maps be made for
only the two Campuses, the sum necessary to be sup-
plied by Mr. Rogers, and that this project be given
a high priority.

(e) Referring to paragraph 8, minutes of meeting of July
23, 1959, motion by Dr. Anderson, seconded by Mr.
Arnold, carried unanimously that the Campus Develop-
ment Committee be requested to study the master plan
of the Campus, including space utilization studies,
and made recommendations for future allocation of
various areas and functions, although not necessarily
the actual building sites; that the Committee transmit
its recommendations to the Board of Regents through
the President, and that during the studies the members
of the Committee, or as many members as possible, meet
with the Regents Building Committee at least once dur-
ing the deliberations and before the final presenta-
tion of recommendations to the Board of Regents.

(f) Referring to paragraph 10, minutes of meeting of July
23, 1959, Dr. Anderson discussed a master plan which
would be kept "fluid"; one that would show changes as
they are made, or as they are contemplated; buildings
would be constructed to scale and laid out according
to their present position on the Campus. New build-
ings could be put on the model to see how they look
and to locate crowded areas. Power distribution sys-
tem, cables, walks, roadways, etc. would be shown by
colored lines. Dr. Anderson proposed that the plan
be laid out on a flat surface and be ready for the
next session of the Legislature.

Motion was made by Dr. Anderson and seconded by Mr.
Arnold, as follows: The University Engineer shall be
instructed by the Administration to proceed with the
planning and construction of model master plans of the
two main Campus areas, to go at least one block depth
of the areas surrounding the Campuses. He shall seek
whatever help is deemed desirable from other areas of
the University. For the implementation of this proj-
ect, $1000 shall be appropriated from otherwise un-
allocated funds. To further implement the preparation
of master planning for both Campuses, it is recommended
that a sum of $5000 shall be requested from the Legis-
lature in addition to the sum requested for obtaining
aerial surveys and preparation of appropriate contour
maps. The motion carried unanimously.

(g) Fine Arts building furnishings were discussed by Mr.
Rogers, who stressed the need to provide for them in
the priority list.

Motion by Mr. Arnold, seconded by Mr. Crumley, carried
unanimously that the Fine Arts building furnishings be
put at the top of the priority list for the Reno
Campus.

(h) Referring to paragraph 5, minutes of meeting of July
23, 1959, motion by Mr. Broadbent, seconded by Mr.
Germain, carried unanimously that the priority recom-
mended by the Regents Building Committee for the Las
Vegas Campus be approved, as follows:

Las Vegas Campus

1. Science and Technology Building
(construction fund) $ 473,600
2. Land Acquisition (construction fund) 150,000
3. Utilities, Walks and Parking (con-
struction fund) 38,000
4. Landscaping (construction fund) 10,000
5. Library Building (construction fund) 600,000
6. Fine Arts Building (design fund) 22,500
7. Dormitory and Dining Facility (design
fund) 30,000

Total $1,324,100

The revised listing of priorities for the Reno Campus,
taking into consideration the changes authorized by
the Board of Regents at this meeting, was agreed to
be as follows:

Reno Campus

1. Furnishing for Fine Arts Building $ 50,000
2. Central Heating Plant (construction
fund) 340,000
3. Photograph, Model and Aerial Surveys
of Properties 12,700
4. Engineering Building (construction
fund) 2,881,200
5. Social Science Classroom Building
(design and construction fund) 1,280,000
6. Student Health Facility and Student
Union Addition (design and construc-
tion matching funds) Approximately 300,000
7. Physical Science Building (design and
construction funds) 2,500,000
8. Utilities, Walks and Parking (design
and construction funds) 60,000
9. Landscaping (design and construction
funds) 5,000
10. Men's Physical Education and ROTC
Building (planning fund) 15,000
11. Life Science Addition to Fleischmann
Agricultural Building (design and con-
struction funds) 665,000
12. Remodel Old Agriculture Building
(design fund) 24,240
13. Home Management Residence (design fund) 5,000
14. School of Nursing Building (design fund) 11,326
15. Morrill Hall (structural survey) 1,000

Total $8,150,466

(i) Women's Dormitory application to HHFA was discussed.
Mr. Rogers and President Armstrong recommended that
funds be sought for design, planning and construction
of a Women's Dormitory as authorized by the Legislature
in 1957.

Motion by Dr. Anderson, seconded by Mr. Broadbent,
carried unanimously that the Administration be author-
ized to go ahead with furtherance of the application
for the Women's Dormitory, by submitting the necessary
information to the State Planning Board so that formal
application can be made to the Housing and Home Finance
Agency.

(j) In general discussion, it was considered advisable to
secure advice from members of the faculty who will be
using the particular buildings of the Campus, before
construction begins.

Motion by Dr. Anderson, seconded by Mr. Germain, car-
ried unanimously that, in line with past custom, a
committee to be called an Ad Hoc University Building
Committee be appointed by the President to study and
make recommendations on each new building or major
facility to be constructed by the University. The
Committee's functions shall be as follows:

1 - It will be concerned with the uses and functions
of the building as users.

2 - It shall not concern itself with the site, orienta-
tion, exterior or architectural appearance of the
building.

3 - The entire Committee, or as many members as pos-
sible, shall meet with the Building Committee of
the Board of Regents at least once during the
final planning stages, the meeting to be as near
as possible preceding the final presentation of
recommendations to the Board of Regents.

4 - The Committee will be dissolved and its functions
terminated when the final building plans are ap-
proved by the Board of Regents.

(k) The Engineering-Mines Building Committee met on August
7 and took notice of the time limits set by the State
Planning Board. A resolution was passed and forwarded
to the President, putting forth its reasons for con-
cluding as follows:

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Engineering-Mines
Building Committee recommend to the President of
the University that they attempt to obtain a re-
vision of the time table imposed by the Planning
Board on the Architects, requiring virtual comple-
tion of plans and specifications for the Engineer-
ing-Mines building by December 1, 1959, and to
recommend the extension of the date by at least
30 days.

Motion by Mr. Tyson, seconded by Mr. Arnold, carried
unanimously that the date of October 18, set by the
Planning Board for checking of plans, be changed to
December 1, 1959.

(l) Mr. Rogers explained the plan for providing additional
parking areas in view of removal of present parking
areas which have been used for sites for buildings. He
showed by a drawing of the Campus areas proposed for
future development and suggested that the University
go forward with surfacing the area of the site formerly
used by the married housing units.

Motion by Mr. Broadbent, seconded by Mr. Tyson, carried
unanimously that the Regents approve these additional
parking areas and that the Engineer be authorized to
proceed with surfacing the previous site of the married
housing units.

(m) The need to expedite the processes of the building
program, especially as to securing of signatures and
approval of plans, was discussed.

Motion by Mr. Tyson, seconded by Mr. Arnold, carried
unanimously that the Regents Building Committee be
authorized to approve preliminary building plans.

(n) Bids for the Greenhouse were opened by the State Plan-
ning Board in Carson City on August 12, 1959, as
follows:

Savini Construction Company
Base Bid $110,877 Alternate Add $11,141
Hardesty & Sons
Base Bid $115,000 Alternate Add $11,700
Harrington Construction Company
Base Bid $106,759 Alternate Add $11,661
Lembke Construction Company
Base Bid $125,979 Alternate Add $ 9,850

The bid was awarded to Harrington Construction Company.

Motion by Mr. Tyson, seconded by Mr. Arnold, carried
unanimously that the awarding of the bid be approved.

13. University Budget

In line with the request by the Board of Regents on July
11, President Armstrong sent a memorandum to each Dean ask-
ing him to study the budgets "in an effort to determine
whether the presently contemplated requested State appro-
priation can be reduced from a 28% increase over the current
appropriation to approximately 24.5%." Replies indicated
that it would be possible to make some adjustment in the
Agricultural budget by removing from equipment an infra-red
Spectro-Photometer in the amount of $15,000 and in Student
Affairs by reducing operation by $1,625. An adjustment had
been made in Arts and Science by removing an item in the
amount of $1,500 which was duplicated in the listing. Pres-
ident Armstrong stated that in his opinion any further budg-
et cuts would seriously impair the University program.

Mr. Germain requested that the equipment amount for Ath-
letics at Nevada Southern be increased to $5,000 to provide
for preliminary work in fielding a football team, that the
operating budget for Athletics be increased to $8,000 to
provide for increase in enrollment, and that the salary item
in the amount of $6,200 for a new position be increased to
$12,000 to provide for an additional new person.

Motion by Mr. Crumley, seconded by Mr. Tyson, carried unani-
mously that the budget request be presented to the Legisla-
ture with the adjustments recommended by President Armstrong
and Mr. Germain.

14. Nevada Southern Student Fees

President Armstrong presented a request from the President
of the Confederated Students of Nevada Southern, as follows:

Having been authorized by the Student Body Senate and
the Executive Committee, I would like to request a raise
in the present student activity fee from $10 per semes-
ter to $11 per semester.

Such an increase would enable the Student Body to aid in
the expense of the athletic program by our contributing
to the Athletic Fund. If there are any questions on
this subject, please contact me at any time.

The request was forwarded by Dean Carlson with his approval,
and received Dean Wood's approval also. President Armstrong
recommended that the request be granted.

Motion by Mr. Arnold, seconded by Mr. Germain, carried
unanimously that the request to increase the student activ-
ity fee at Nevada Southern from $10 to $11 per semester be
approved effective with the Fall semester 1959, and that the
Comptroller be authorized to collect this amount. The in-
crease is to be allocated to the Athletic Fund.

15. Broadcasting Athletic Events

Mr. Hayden read a communication from Mr. Lawlor, Director
of Athletics, recommending that a better bid might be re-
ceived for a broadcasting contract on a 2-year basis. The
advantages and disadvantages were discussed.

Motion by Mr. Crumley, seconded by Mr. Arnold, carried
unanimously that the Administration, through the Athletic
Department, be authorized to negotiate for bids in this
connection and to accept the best bid for either one or
two years.

16. Citizens Advisory Committee for the Library

Mr. Gordon Sampson, Secretary of the Citizens Advisory Com-
mittee for the Library, had requested on behalf of the Com-
mittee, that the Regents appoint one or more of its members
to work with the Citizens Committee in preparing a resolu-
tion covering their previous request (minutes of March 7,
1959) that a project be undertaken to try to locate and
preserve valuable historical documents in the State. Pres-
ident Armstrong recommended that the Chair appoint one Re-
gent to work with Mr. Sampson and the advisory group.

Motion by Mr. Arnold, seconded by Mr. Crumley, carried
unanimously that the Vice Chairman appoint a member of the
Board to work with the Citizens Advisory Committee for the
Library in this capacity.

Vice Chairman Lombardi appointed Mr. Arnold.

17. Citizens Advisory Committee for Home Economics

President Armstrong read a letter from the Chairman of the
Citizens Advisory Committee for Home Economics saying that
Mrs. Robert Aiazzi had resigned because of pressure of other
duties, and requesting that Miss Frances Humphrey be ap-
pointed in her place. President Armstrong recommended ap-
proval.

Motion by Mr. Arnold, seconded by Mr. Tyson, carried unani-
mously that the President be authorized to extend an invi-
tation to Miss Humphrey to serve on the Citizens Advisory
Committee for Home Economics in the place of Mrs. Aiazzi.

18. Solar Energy

President Armstrong reported that in recent weeks he has
been in correspondence with Senators Bible and Cannon con-
cerning the Association for Applied Solar Energy and that
the University has now become a member of the Association.
A meeting has been arranged for September 2 in Las Vegas
with Mr. Mc Lean, Executive Vice President of the Associ-
ation for Applied Solar Energy, and representatives of
industry in Southern Nevada to discuss this and other proj-
ects that may be in the realm of applied solar energy, and
particularly a potential role for the University of Nevada
in such work.

19. Cancer Research Center

Dr. Anderson was in possession of 3 letters (not addressed
to him or to the Board of Regents) concerning the develop-
ment of a Cancer Research Center in Las Vegas and express-
ing the hope that this would lay the groundwork for a Medi-
cal School in Las Vegas. No action was requested.

20. Next Meeting

The next meeting of the Board was set for October 9 and 10.
On Friday, October 9, the Regents plan to make a general
inspection of Campus facilities and on Saturday, October 10,
the regular meeting will be held.

The meeting adjourned at 5:45 P.M.

L. E. Lombardi
Vice Chairman

Alice Terry
Secretary