07/24/1964

UCCSN Board of Regents' Meeting Minutes
July 24-25, 1964








7-24-1964

Pages 138-174



UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA

BOARD OF REGENTS

July 24, 1964



The Board of Regents met in the President's Office, Clark Ad-

ministration building, Reno Campus, on Friday and Saturday,

July 24-25, 1964. Present: Regents Anderson, Davis, Germain,

Grant, Hug, Jacobsen, Lombardi (from noon on), Magee, White;

Vice President-Finance Humphrey, Engineer Rogers, President

Armstrong. Members of the Press were Laxalt, Dromiack, Glendon,

Stewart, Wilson.



The meeting was called to order by Chairman Grant at 9:20 A.M.

to hear budget presentations for the biennium 1965-67.



President Armstrong explained that budget requests originated

within the Departments with the faculty and Department Chairmen,

and were transmitted to the Dean of the College for review and

modification. The Deans forwarded the requests to the President,

at which point the Vice President-Finance, and the Executive Vice

President analyzed the requests and reviewed them with the Pres-

ident. Following that, there were formal hearings with the Deans

at which Mr. Humphrey, Dr. Young, Mr. Barrett, Director of Admin-

istration (State), and a member of his staff, Mr. Terrill, Leg-

islative Fiscal Analyst, and a member of his staff, were present.

Following the hearings, the President went over the budgets again

with Mr. Humphrey and Dr. Young and formulated the budget request

presented to the Regents as to what is reasonable, desirable,

needed and fully justified for presentation to the Legislature.

Each Dean received a copy of the budget, which was also mailed

to the Regents, and the Deans were told that if they wished to

request a review of any budget items, they could do so. Dean

Irwin asked for reconsideration of the budget for the Bureau of

Governmental Research, and it was sent to the Regents with the

President's recommendation for approval.



Dr. Armstrong also called attention to the fact that the budget

is built around the proposal to use out-of-state tuition for

capital improvements, in accord with previous action of the

Board. The Deans have been requested to indicate what adjust-

ments were necessary and how their program was handicapped due

to cutbacks in the last biennium.



Mr. Humphrey discussed the budget with the use of charts as

follows:



(1) Fulltime equivalent students (FTE)

(2) Location of fulltime-student-equivalency students,

Fall 1965

(3) 1965-67 budget by function

(4) Average total enrollment

(5) Budget by object, 1965-67

(6) Revenues



The hearings commenced at 10:10 A.M. with Dean Ralph A. Irwin

discussing the budgets for the College of Arts and Science, the

Psychological Service Center, the Bureau of Governmental Research

and the Center for Western North American Studies.



Dean J. Patrick Kelly discussed the budget for Statewide Services

Division, Associate in Arts Nursing Program, Audio-Visual Commun-

ications Reno, Summer School Subsidy, and Technical Education.



Dean Marjorie Elmore discussed the budget for the Orvis School

of Nursing.



Dean Vernon E. Scheid discussed the budget for the Mackay School

of Mines, the Nevada Bureau of Mines, and the Nevada Mining Ana-

lytical Laboratory.



The Board recessed at 12:00 noon for luncheon in the Travis

Student Union, and for a meeting of the Regents' Building Com-

mittee. The meeting resumed in regular session at 2:30 P.M.



Dean William D. Carlson discussed the budget for Nevada Southern

- Summary of positions, Instruction, General Expense and Library.



Dean Thomas D. O'Brien discussed the budget for the Graduate

School.



Mr. Robert P. Laxalt discussed the budget for Publications and

News Service, and the University Press.



Professor Wendell A. Mordy discussed the budget for the Desert

Research Institute.



Dean Dale W. Bohmont discussed the budget for the Max C. Fleis-

chmann College of Agriculture, the Agricultural Experiment Sta-

tion, and the Agricultural Extension Division.



Dean Robert C. Weems discussed the budget for the College of

Business Administration and the Bureau of Business and Economic

Research.



Dr. Harold N. Brown, in the absence of Acting Dean Willey, dis-

cussed the budget for the College of Education and the Laboratory

School.



Dean James T. Anderson discussed the budget for the College of

Engineering and the Nevada Standards Laboratory.



Mr. James D. Rogers discussed the budget for the Buildings and

Grounds, Reno Campus and Las Vegas Campus.



Dean Sam M. Basta discussed the budget for the Office of Student

Affairs, Reno.



Dr. Jack Shirley discussed the budget for the Office of Admis-

sions and Registrar.



Mr. David Heron discussed the budget for the Library, Reno

Campus.



The meeting was recessed at 5:20 P.M.



The recessed meeting was called to order by Chairman Grant at

9:15 A.M. on July 25 in the President's Office with all Regents

present, also Vice President-Finance Humphrey, Engineer Rogers,

and President Armstrong. Mr. Walsh of the Office of the Attorney

General was present as Legal Adviser. Mr. Barrett, Director of

Administration (State), was present as an observer. Members of

the Press were Dromiack, Stewart, Glendon, Wilson.



1. Minutes of Previous Meeting



Upon motion by Mrs. Magee, seconded by Dr. Anderson, the

minutes of the meeting of May 30, 1964 were amended as

follows and approved unanimously:



Item 12 - Regents' Scholarships for Nevada Residents - page

126, last paragraph, changed to read: "An expedient first

step in expanding the scholarship program would seem to be

either a Regents' or State program of scholarships for in-

coming students who have graduated from Nevada High Schools,

or who are Nevada residents." Page 128, motion by Dr.

Anderson to adopt the scholarship program was amended to

include the following: "Establish up to a maximum of 20

registration fee waivers for American Indian students who

are Nevada residents or graduates of high schools in Nevada,

with continuation of the fee waivers to be contingent upon

the student's maintaining satisfactory academic standing.

They may be continued for four years' attendance at the

University. As in the provision for Nevada residents, stu-

dents from outside the Reno-Las Vegas metropolitan areas

would be given an additional grant-in-aid of $150 per sem-

ester which would be roughly equivalent to the cost of a

room in the University residence halls and the additional

expense of board at the University rather than at home.

These are to be included in the 3% limitation for fee

waivers and grants-in-aid as set forth in the previous mo-

tion by Dr. Lombardi."



2. University Budget for the 1965-67 Biennium



President Armstrong recommended approval of the budget as

presented, including the Bureau of Governmental Research.



Motion by Mr. Davis, seconded by Dr. Lombardi, carried

unanimously that the Proposed Budget for the 1965-67 Bien-

nium be approved as presented.



3. Approval of Check Registers



President Armstrong recommended approval of the Check

Registers, as submitted by Vice President-Finance Humphrey.



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Germain, carried

unanimously by roll call vote that the Check Registers be

approved.



4. National Defense Student Loan Program for 1964-65 Fiscal

Year



President Armstrong presented the following report from

Mr. Humphrey:



We have been notified by the Bureau of Educational

Assistance Programs, Office of Education, U. S. Depart-

ment of Health, Education and Welfare, that our request

has been approved for Federal Capital Contribution of

$99,900 for the 1964-65 National Defense Student Loan

Program. This approval is subject to final appropria-

tion of funds by Congress. The advance firm commit-

ment is $32,290 but the final figure, based on previous

experience, should be close to the $99,900 approved.



In order to receive this money from the government it

will be necessary for the University to provide $11,100

as the "Institutional Capital Contribution". I recom-

mend that you request the Board of Regents to authorize

a transfer of up to $11,100 from the Garvey Rhodes Loan

Fund (1-61-5006) to the National Educational Act Student

Loan Fund (1-61-4001). This transfer can take place in

segments during the year as needed.



As of June 30, 1964, the Garvey Rhodes Loan Fund had a

loanable cash balance of $27,155.74 and $5,815.00 of

loans outstanding, for a total of $32,970.74 in the loan

fund.



President Armstrong recommended approval of the transfer.



Motion by Mr. Germain, seconded by Dr. White, carried

unanimously by roll call vote that the fund transfer be

authorized to provide the University's share in the National

Student Loan Program for 1964-65.



5. Fund Transfers



President Armstrong reported the following transfers of

less than $2000 from Contingency Reserve:



a) For Fiscal Year 1963-64



#257 $500 to Postage, Reno, to finish 1963-64.



#258 $250 to In-State Travel, Supervised Teaching,

College of Education, to provide sufficient

travel money to all supervision of practice

teachers.



b) For Fiscal Year 1964-65



#9 $110 to Civil Engineering Department, College

of Engineering, to provide for adjustment of

technical salary budget.



#14 $960 to Electrical Engineering Department,

College of Engineering, to establish a tempo-

rary lecturer position.



#16 $1757 to Office of Student Affairs, Reno, to

correct a mistake by the Business Manager in

the final work program in which an authorized

1/2 time clerical position was not funded.



#17 $1403 to Office of Student Affairs, Reno, to

provide operating monies needed due to assimila-

tion of Teacher Placement Office (not previously

budgeted here).



#21 $1250 to Radiological Safety Board, to provide

for student labor ($1.25 hour, 20 hours per week

for 50 weeks).



President Armstrong requested approval of the following

transfers of more than $2000 from Contingency Reserve:



a) For Fiscal Year 1963-64



#256 $2489.18 to Miscellaneous, Not Otherwise Class-

ified. This account was severly underbudgeted

in 1963-64. Main items covered by this transfer

are accreditation visits at Nevada Southern and

$1695.62 of water taxes for Boca Dam district.



#259 $3350.00 to Salaries, Supervised Teaching, Col-

lege of Education. There was an unusually large

number of student teachers to be supervised and

since only a part of these students are register-

ed in the College of Education, the budget es-

timates present a difficult problem.



b) For Fiscal Year 1964-65



#22 $3800.00 to Buildings & Grounds, Reno, Repairs,

to demolish old Gymnasium ($2600) and provide a

roof for rifle range which will be left in place.



Through oversight, the following transfers were not prev-

iously cleared through the Board of Regents. Dr. Armstrong

requested approval.



#137 $1000 from Geology-Geography Department, Mackay

School of Mines, (Professional Salaries) to

Buildings and Grounds, Reno (Repairs).



#138 $3000 from Nevada Mining Analytical Laboratory

(Professional Salaries) to Buildings and Grounds

(Repairs).



These two transfers were necessary to concentrate funds

needed to construct the "Neutron Vault" located below the

ground between the Mackay School of Mines building and the

Scrugham Engineering-Mines building.



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Germain, carried

unanimously by roll call vote that the above fund transfers

be approved.



6. Report of Bid Openings



President Armstrong presented the following items:



a) A meeting to open bids was held in the Business Office,

Morrill Hall, at 2:00 P.M. on Monday, June 8, 1964.

Present were Assistant Business Manager Hattori, Elec-

trical Engineer Carpenter, and Assistant University

Engineer Whalen. Bid notice had duly appeared in local

papers for DEMOLITION OF OLD GYMNASIUM, UNIVERSITY OF

NEVADA, RENO.



Bids were received and opened by Mr. Hattori as follows:



Weichmann Engineers $18,900

accompanied by bid bond



Schopper's Construction Company 8,800

accompanied by bid bond



It is recommended that these bids be rejected, inasmuch

as they are above the estimates prepared by the Univer-

sity Engineer's Office.



Respectfully submitted,



/s/ Brian J. Whalen for James D. Rogers

University Engineer



Approved:

Neil D. Humphrey, Business Manager

Charles J. Armstrong, President



Motion by Mr. Hug, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen, carried

unanimously that the rejection of the bids be approved.



b) A meeting to open bids was held in the Business Office,

Morrill Hall, at 2:00 P.M. on Tuesday, June 9, 1964.

Present were Assistant Business Manager Hattori and

Assistant Engineer Whalen. Bid notice had duly appear-

ed in local papers for LANDSCAPING, FLEISCHMANN ATMOS-

PHERIUM-PLANETARIUM, UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO.



Mr. Hattori opened the only bid received:



Fred W. Schopper Construction Co. $ 4,400

accompanied by bid bond



It is recommended that the bid of Fred W. Schopper

Construction Company in the amount of $4400 be accepted

and that a contract be drawn to accomplish this work.

This bid is within the estimate prepared by the Uni-

versity Engineer's Office and funds are available in

the Building and Grounds Operating Repairs Budget,

Account No. 1-01-9010-39.



Respectfully submitted,



/s/ Brian J. Whalen for James D. Rogers

University Engineer



Approved:

Neil D. Humphrey, Business Manager

Charles J. Armstrong, President



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Dr. Lombardi,

carried unanimously by roll call vote that the accept-

ance of the bid and the awarding of the contract be

approved.



c) A meeting to open bids was held in the Business Office,

Morrill Hall, at 2:00 P.M. on Wednesday, July 1, 1964.

Present were Chief Accountant Hattori and Assistant

University Engineer Whalen. Bid notice had duly appear-

ed in local papers for DEMOLITION OF OLD GYMNASIUM,

UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO.



Mr. Hattori opened the only bid received:



Cook's Building Wreckers $ 2,600

accompanied by cashier's check



It is recommended that the bid of Cook's Building

Wreckers in the amount of $2600 be accepted, and that

a contract be drawn to accomplish this work. This bid

is within the estimate prepared by the University En-

gineer's Office. Request for transfer of funds from

Reserve Contingencies to Buildings and Grounds Operat-

ing Repairs Budget has been made; if the request is

approved, funds will be available in the Buildings and

Grounds Operating Repairs Budget, Account No. 1-01-9018-

39.



Respectfully submitted,



/s/ James D. Rogers

University Engineer



Approved:

Neil D. Humphrey, Vice President-Finance

Charles J. Armstrong, President



Motion by Mr. Germain (with regrets), seconded by Dr.

White, carried unanimously by roll call vote that the

acceptance of the bid and the awarding of the contract

be approved.



d) A meeting to open bids was held in the Business Office,

Morrill Hall, at 2:00 P.M. on Wednesday, July 1, 1964.

Present were Professor George B. Maxey and Mr. Patrick

A. Domenico, Research Associate of the Desert Research

Institute. Bid notices were not given to the newspapers

but bid forms entitled WELL DRILLING IN LAS VEGAS VALLEY

were distributed widely in southern Nevada by the South-

ern Nevada Well Contractors' Association and representa-

tives of the State Engineer's Office and the University

of Nevada.



Bids were received and opened by Dr. Maxey as follows:



Phelps Pump and Equipment Company $12,940.00

P. H. Thompson 9,516.25

S. R. Mc Kinney and Son 11,642.50



It is recommended that the bid of P. H. Thompson in the

amount of $9516.25 be accepted, and that a contract be

drawn to accomplish this work. This bid is within the

estimate prepared by the Desert Research Institute and

funds are available in the Influence of Geology on Water

Account No. 1-13-4010.



Respectfully submitted,



/s/ George B. Maxey

Research Professor of

Hydrology and Geology



Approved:

Neil D. Humphrey, Vice President-Finance

Charles J. Armstrong, President



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mrs. Magee, carried

by roll call vote with Regents Germain and White voting

"no" and all other Regents voting "aye". Mr. Germain

stated that his negative vote was due to the fact that

notices of bid were not given to the newspapers.



7. Building Committee Meeting



Minutes were distributed for the meeting of the Regents'

Building Committee held on Friday, July 24, 1964, which

was attended by all members of the Board.



Motion was made by Dr. Lombardi to approve the minutes and

the actions of the Committee.



Mr. Jacobsen discussed the Item on Review of Sketches of

Physical Science and Social Science Projects' Exterior

Appearances, and suggested that the wording indicate more

clearly that the University is to employ the consulting

architect.



Motion was made by Mr. Jacobsen to amend the motion of Dr.

Lombardi to reword Item No. 3 as it appears in the following

minutes. Dr. Lombardi accepted the amendment and the amend-

ed motion carried unanimously to accept the minutes as fol-

lows and to approve the actions taken.



Dr. Fred Anderson, Chairman of the Regents' Building Com-

mittee, called the meeting to order at 12:45 P.M.



Other members present were: Dr. Lombardi, Mr. Jacobsen,

Mr. Hug and Mr. Germain. In addition, Regents Grant,

Magee, White and Davis were present, as well as President

Armstrong, Vice President Humphrey, University Engineer

Rogers, Secretary Alice Terry, Assistant Secretary Bonnie

Smotony and Mr. Laxalt.



Members of the architectural firms of Vhay and Ferrari and

Lockard and Casazza entered the meeting to discuss Item

No. 3.



Item No. 1 - Preliminary Plans for the Radiological-Health

Research Project



Mr. Rogers reviewed the Preliminary Plans for the Radiologi-

cal-Health Research Project. These plans were developed by

Moffitt and Hendricks to meet the requirements of the Rad-

iological-Health Research staff. The fee for preliminary

design was paid by the Federal Government.



Mr. Jacobsen moved, Mr. Hug seconded, to approve the Pre-

liminary Plans; passed unanimously.



Item No. 2 - Intermediate Plans for Eight-Story Dormitory



Mr. Rogers reviewed Intermediate Plans for Eight-Story

Dormitory. Seldon and Steward, architects, have developed

some further details since preliminary design.



A. The Committee also discussed the staff recommenda-

tion that this Dormitory be designated for use by

men.



Mr. Davis moved, Mr. Hug seconded, that the build-

ing be so designated; passed, with one dissenting

vote.



B. Mr. Germain moved, Dr. Lombardi seconded, that the

Dormitory be named "Nye Hall", honoring both the

county and the former Governor Nye. This was

passed with one dissenting vote.



C. Dr. Lombardi moved, Mr. Hug seconded, to recommend

to the Board of Regents that the Intermediate

Plans for the new Dormitory be approved. Passed

unanimously.



Item No. 3 - Review of Sketches of Physical Science and

Social Science Project's Exterior Appearances



Mr. Vhay of Vhay and Ferrari reviewed the sketches of the

Social Science Project which depicted the exterior appear-

ance.



Mr. Casazza of Lockard and Casazza reviewed the sketches

of the Physical Science Project which depicted the exterior

appearance.



Mr. Jacobsen moved, Mr. Hug seconded, that a decision on

these sketches be delayed, that the services of a consult-

ing architect be obtained, and that the Planning Board be

contacted concerning the retention of a consultant archi-

tect and if the Planning Board does not finance the con-

sultant's fee, the charge would be funded from an operating

account and that the consultant review the sketches with

the Building Committee of the Board of Regents on August

17th, P.M., if possible. The consulting architect would

be chosen and retained by the University Administration.

Passed unanimously.



Item No. 4 - Power Line Right-of-Way



Mr. Rogers presented a request for a right-of-way for a

power line to serve the two church properties in Las Vegas.

The Nevada Power Company has requested that the Board of

Regents grant a 6-foot wide right-of-way, 735 feet in

length, along the southern boundary of the two church

properties. This will allow construction of an overhead

pole line to serve the church properties.



Mr. Jacobsen moved, Dr. Lombardi seconded, that the Commit-

tee recommend to the Board of Regents that the right-of-way

not be granted, as all power lines will be placed under-

ground, and to instruct the Administration to notify the

church groups that the Board urges that the church groups

place their power lines underground. Passed unanimously.



Item No. 5 - School of Nursing Location



Mr. Rogers stated that the loction of the School was not

shown on the approved Master Plan and since the use of any

present Campus area would fail to meet at least one of the

following requirements, a study to purchase additional prop-

erty is recommended:



A. Located near Life Science Department

B. Located in an area which would allow expansion for

Nursing

C. Located near any future Medical School



Mr. Germain moved, Mr. Jacobsen seconded, that the Committee

recommend to the Board of Regents that, for the purpose of

making application for federal support of the construction

of the Nursing building, the building be located southeast

of Mackay Science Hall. Passed unanimously.



Item No. 6 - Architect Selection for School of Nursing

Building



Mr. Rogers reported that Mr. Edward Parsons has worked on

this project, having been retained by Dr. Orvis who donated

funds toward the accomplishment of it. Mr. Rogers had dis-

cussed the selection with Dean Elmore and they concluded

that Mr. Parsons should be considered to complete the de-

sign of the Nursing building.



Dr. Lombardi moved, Mr. Germain seconded, that the Committee

recommend to the Board of Regents that Mr. Edward Parsons be

selected to design the School of Nursing building. Passed

unanimously.



The meeting adjourned at 2:25 P.M.



Neil D. Humphrey

Acting Secretary



Further discussion followed as to the implementation of

Item No. 3. Dr. Anderson proposed a meeting of the Build-

ing Committee with the consulting architect and then a meet-

ing of the consulting architect with the other architects,

but that the local architects be informed first that the

Regents are not satisfied with the plans. It was agreed

that this procedure be followed.



A meeting of the Regents' Building Committee was set for

the afternoon of August 17 (Monday) followed by a meeting

in the evening with the architects. It was noted that

the consulting architect may or may not be employed by

that date.



8. Building Program, Progress Report



Mr. Rogers distributed the report of the status of Capital

Improvement Projects under the jurisdiction of the Nevada

State Planning Board, as follows:



University of Nevada, Reno Campus



A. Construction Projects



1. Electrical Distribution, Clark Administration

Building - All work completed with exception of

outside patching and clean up.

2. Installation Fluid Mechanics Laboratory, Engineer-

ing-Mines Building - Contract awarded to Dave's

Plumbing and Heating Company, Reno, in the amount

of $7375.

3. Connection of Laboratory Benches, Engineering-Mines

Building - The two bids received on July 16 are

currently being analyzed. Low bidder is Dave's

Plumbing and Heating in the amount of $9649.

4. Physical Education Facilities, Phase I (Earthwork

Portion) - Scheduled progress is being maintained

by contractor.



B. Design Projects



1. Social Science Building - Preliminaries pending

approval.

2. Physical Science Building - Preliminaries nearing

completion.

3. Dormitory - Final plans nearing completion.

4. Physical Education Facilities (Phase II) - Final

plans are nearing completion.



C. Deferred Projects



1. Advance Plan College of Education - Further action

pending receipt of scope of work from University.

2. Advance Plan Mackay Science Building Remodel - Fur-

thur action pending receipt of scope of work from

University.

3. Site Development - Further work pending requests

from University.

4. Equip Engineering-Mines Building - Further work

pending requests from University.



D. Dormant Accounts - Funds remain unobligated in the fol-

lowing accounts:



1. Library, Reno Campus

2. Rehabilitate and Extend Utilities

3. Landscaping



University of Nevada, Nevada Southern



A. Construction Projects



1. Social Science Building - Scheduled progress is

being maintained by contractor.

2. Water Service - The 10" line is being installed by

the Latter Day Saints. Upon completion, an agree-

ment will be drawn with the Las Vegas Valley Water

District for payment of $12,600 for State's share

of installation cost.



B. Design Projects



1. Water Line - Bids are being solicited.



C. Deferred Projects



1. Land Acquisition - Further action pending change

of zoning by University.

2. Site Development - Further work pending requests

from University.

3. Dormitory and Dining Hall Furnishings - Work pend-

ing requests from University.



D. Dormant Accounts - Funds remain unobligated in the

following accounts:



1. Library, Las Vegas Campus

2. Installation of Utilities

3. Landscaping

4. Outside Courts and Landscaping



Mr. Rogers distributed copies of report on the status of

Capital Improvement Projects under University supervision,

as follows:



A. Construction Projects



1. Dairy Farm - Completed.

2. Move Temporary Building "B" - Completed.

3. Top Soil, Landscaping and Sprinklers, Jot Travis

Union Addition and Juniper Hall - 50% completed.

4. Paving, Lincoln Hall Driveway, Reno Campus - Com-

pleted.

5. Installation of Window Coverings, Fleischmann Life

Science Wing, Reno Campus - 90% completed.

6. Installation of Window Shades, Frandsen Humanities,

Reno Campus - Completed.

7. Landscaping, Fleischmann Atmospherium-Planetarium -

75% completed.

8. Demolition of Old Gymnasium - 5% completed.



B. Design Projects



1. Dining and Dormitory, Las Vegas Campus - Preparing

working drawings.

2. Radiological Buildings, Las Vegas - Negotiating

contract with architect.

3. Landscaping and Sprinklers, Scrugham Engineering-

Mines Building - Drawings completed; preparing

specfications.

4. Remodeling Mechanical Engineering Shop Building -

Preparing drawings and specifications.



C. Miscellaneous



1. Land-Use Change, Las Vegas - Public hearing, August

11, 1964.

2. Traffic Signal, North Virginia Street at Gymnasium -

Highway Department vehicular and pedestrian count

completed April 28, 1964; does not justify a signal

at this time.



Motion by Dr. Anderson, seconded by Mrs. Magee, carried

unanimously to accept the report.



9. Estimative Budgets for 1964-65



Copies had previously been mailed to the Regents with the

following explanation and recommendation by the President:



"....estimative budgets will be used for those activities

which have fluctuating revenue sources and where the rate

of expenditure is usually tied closely to the current rev-

enues. If the estimated revenue materializes, then the

authorized expenditure may proceed without further approval,

the same as in appropriational budgets. If the revenues

are less, expenditures must usually be reduced. If reven-

ues are greater than estimated the expense of operation

will usually also be greater and the necessary amendments

can be effected. If the revenue is approximately as esti-

mated but the pattern of expenditure is to be changed,

amendment must also be effected.



"....The Board has, in the past, delegated to the President

authority to approve estimative budgets. I have previously

recommended that beginning with the fiscal year 1963-64 the

estimative budgets be submitted to the Board for approval

in order that the problems involved in this important part

of the University's operation be better understood. I also

recommend that the authority to amend these budgets continue

to be delegated to me in order that decisions can be made

quickly and that the Board not be forced to review unnec-

essary detail. I assure you that any substantial amendments

effecting policy will be referred to you and the year-end

report will clearly show any amendments made."



Motion by Mr. Germain, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen, carried

unanimously that the estimative budgets be approved, as

presented.



10. Personnel Recommendations



President Armstrong presented his personnel recommendations.

At the suggestion of Regent Germain, it was agreed that they

be considered in Executive Session.



11. Acceptance of Gifts



President Armstrong recommended acceptance of the following

gifts and grants which had been received by the University:



To the Library, Reno Campus



Miss Barna M. Avre, Redlands, California - copy of her book,

"L'Otage de Paul Claudel".



Mr. Edward J. Beinecke, New York - 6th and final volume of

Stevenson Catalog.



The Bollingen Foundation, New York - volumes 9, 10 and 11

of "Jewish Symbols in the Greco-Roman Period", copy of

"The Eternal Present: The Beginnings of Architecture",

and copy of "Shaminism".



Mr. Shirl Coleman, Reno - 40 miscellaneous books.



Mrs. Ruth Manson Collins, Reno - copy of "My Adventure

with Your Money", in memory of her father.



Mr. John Gent, Reno - 24 books, mainly in the field of

Science.



Mr. and Mrs. Raymond M. Hellman, Reno - collection of arch-

itectural magazines and "The Catalog".



Dr. H. C. Holler, Mexico - copy of his book "The Paradox of

Culture".



Dr. Austin E. Hutcheson, Reno - copy of "Ancient Times, A

History of the Early World".



Mrs. Inna Marinel, New York - 80 United Nations publica-

tions, including Treaty Series volumes and I. C. J. reports,

valued at $200.



Mrs. Emory M. Marshall, Genoa - 187 volumes at an estimated

value of $75.



Major Dwight E. Mayo, Mesa, Arizona - his master's thesis,

"Arizona and the Colorado River Compact".



Professor A. J. Sbarounis, Athens, Greece - copy of the

"Economic Development of Greece", copies of "American

Philhellenism and Public Finance", and one of the programs

of the 16th Congress of the International Fiscal Associa-

tion.



Mr. Phillip E. Siggers, Washington, D. C. - miscellaneous

books.



Mr. Kenneth E. Thomas, Reno - 2-volume edition of "The

Practical Operations and Management of a Bank".



Mrs. H. J. Thorpe, Reno - 11 Scottish magazines.



Dr. William R Wood, University of Alaska - 1st issue of

the "Monthly Review of Economic and Business Conditions in

Alaska".



Federal Government Accountants Association, Washington,

D. C. - one year's subscription to "The Federal Accountant"

in memory of its first President, Mr. Robert W. King.



Religious Science Church, Reno - copy of "The Science of

Mind".



Mrs. A. L. Stadtherr, Reno - 95 books.



Mrs. Janet Randall, Whittier, California - copy of her book

"Jellyfoot".



For the Max C. Fleischmann Matching Book Fund:



Dr. Fred Anderson, Reno - $121.20 representing amount

received for travel.

Mrs. Richard Magee, Austin - $148 representing amount

received for travel.

International Business Machines Corporation, New York -

$20 to match the gift of Mr. J. A. Goetz, Jr.

Dr. Lowell L. Jones, University of Nevada - $50

Lockard & Casazza, Reno - $10

Radius Club, Reno - $25

Mrs. Ruth Collins, Reno - $25 in memory of Mr. Charles

M. Oliver.

Sierra Pacific Power Company Board of Directors - $300

in memory of Mr. Forrest Eccles.

Dr. and Mrs. Russell Elliott, Reno - $5 in memory of

Mrs. Emma Mabel Reese.

Mr. Forrest R. Holdcamper, Washington, D. C. - $35 in

memory of Dr. Charles R. Hicks.

Reno Cancer Center - $500 in memory of their late Pres-

ident, Mr. George A. Parker, and $2500 for purchase

of books in special fields.

Mr. Edwin Semenza, Reno - $125 in memory of his brother,

Mr. Lawrence J. Semenza.

Mrs. David Vhay, Reno - $10 in memory of Mrs. Harold

Fowler.

Mrs. W. L. White, Reno - $5 in memory of Mr. Forrest

Eccles.

American Association of University Women, Lovelock

Branch - $50

Anonymous donor - $500

Mr. E. L. Cord, Reno - $1000 to become the first patron

of the Friends of the University Library.

Mr. and Mrs. Lyman W. Griswold, Reno - $365.50 as the

proceeds of a Roast-Pig Party, and $31.50 from a

Benefit Bridge Party.

The Hancock Foundation, Reno - $2000

Junior Classical League, E. Otis Vaughn School - $13

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Porter, Reno - $25

Reno Lion's Club Auxiliary - $200

Sigma Nu Alumni Club - $35

Women's Auxiliary, Washoe County Medical Society - $300

Women's Faculty Club, University of Nevada - $450

Interfraternity Council - $100

Mr. Fred de Longchamps, Reno - $1000

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Germain, Las Vegas - $50

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Horgan, Reno - $50

University of Nevada Alumni - $1447.50

University of Nevada Faculty - $227



To the Library, Las Vegas Campus



Mr. A. C. Grant, Las Vegas - 12 volumes.



Las Vegas Ladies Literary Club - $25



Foley Brothers, Las Vegas - $10 in memory of Mr. Clarence

Irving Wadsworth.



Mr. and Mrs. Don. W. Garvin, Las Vegas - $5 for the Maude

Frazier Memorial Fund.



Scholarship and Fellowship Payments



Nevada State Division, American Association of University

Women - $500 for an AAUW Centennial Fellowship Award.



Dr. Fred Anderson, Reno - $100 for the Dr. Harry Sawyer

Memorial Scholarship Fund.



The Emporium of Music, Reno - $100 for the Emporium of Music

Scholarship.



Forward, Inc., Las Vegas - $486 for the Forward, Inc.

Scholarship.



Humboldt County Bulletin, Winnemucca - $100 for the Humboldt

County Bulletin, Inc. Scholarship.



Executives' Secretaries, Inc., Las Vegas Chapter - $200 for

the Executives' Secretarites Inc. Scholarship.



Las Vegas Press Club - $1474.75 for the Las Vegas Press Club

Scholarship Fund.



Nevada Society of Certified Public Accountants - $300 for

the Nevada Society of Certified Public Accountants Scholar-

ship.



Nevada State Golf Association - $500 to establish "The James

Schuyler Memorial Scholarships". One scholarship is to be

given to a student from a southern Nevada high school for

attendance at the Southern Regional Division, and one to a

student from a northern Nevada high school for attendance

at the University in Reno. Awards shall be made on the

basis of $125 for each semester to start in the Fall of

1964.



Nevada State Nurses Association, District No. 3 - $200 each

for a Nevada Southern Nursing student and a Reno Nursing

student.



Nevada Telephone-Telegraph Company, Tonopah - $250 for Miss

Marie Jensen.



Ormsby County Parent-Teachers Association - $200 for 1st

semester awards.



Mr. Sidney W. Robinson, Reno - $300 for the Mary Elizabeth

Talbot Scholarship.



Honorable Bruce R. Thompson, Reno - $200 for the Reuben

C. Thompson Scholarship.



Washoe Association for Retarded Children, Inc. - $300 for

the Washoe Association of Retarded Children, Inc. Scholar-

ship.



Miss Eugenia Choy, Pomona, California - $5 for the Physical

Education Scholarship Fund.



Miss Jacquelyn Wilson, Santa Clara, California - $25 for

the Physical Education Scholarship Fund.



Mr. and Mrs. David M. Allingham, Reno - $5 for the Bob

Farrar Memorial Scholarship Fund.



Mr. and Mrs. Fred H. Dressler, Gardnerville - $10 for the

Bob Farrar Memorial Scholarship Fund.



Mrs. J. A. Mc Kinnon, San Mateo, California - $50 for the

Mabel Mc Vicar Memorial Scholarship Fund.



Mr. Cameron M. Batjer, Carson City - $200 for the Mabel

Mc Vicar Memorial Scholarship Fund.



Springer and Newton, Reno - $250 for the Springer and Newton

Graduate Student Award.



Mrs. Hilda A. Klute, Reno - $300 for the Klute Scholarship

in Foreign Languages.



Las Vegas Business and Professional Women's Club - $400 for

their scholarship account.



Mrs. Janet K. O'Halloran, Stuttgard, Arkansas - $5 for the

Physical Education Scholarship Fund.



Miss Carolyn Bell, Zephyr Cove, Nevada - $5 for the Physical

Education Scholarship Fund.



Reno Elks Lodge #597 - $1000 for the Elks National Founda-

tion Scholarship Fund account.



Miscellaneous Gifts



Genral Electric Foundation - $1207.38 under their employee-

alumni matching fund program.



Harold's Club, Reno - $2000 for the Lake Tahoe Music Camp.



Jones and Jones, and Station KSHO-TV, Las Vegas - video

tape recording of Nevada Southern's first Commencement.



Nevada Society of Professional Engineers - $25 for the

Nevada Prize Examination in High School Mathematics.



Scottish Rite Bodies of Free Masons of Nevada - $500 to

the 4-H Club Camp project for a pier at Lake Tahoe.



State Bar of Nevada - $75 as a contribution to the Nevada

Inter-Tribal Indian Conference.



State Department of Vocational Education - $6291 to estab-

lish a Registered Nurse Refresher Course under the Manpower

Development and Training Program.



Cummins Engine Company and Watson and Meehan, San Francisco

- a Cummins diesel engine valued at $4300.



Nevada Medallion Committee, Roy A. Hardy, Chairman - a Proof

Centennial Medallion.



Mr. Maurice F. Sheppard, Reno - two European white swans for

Manzanita Lake.



For the Music Concert Series, Las Vegas:



Dr. and Mrs. Chester Lockwood, Las Vegas - $50

Mr. F. I. Relin, Las Vegas - $25

Alpha Kappa of Beta Sigma Phi, Las Vegas - $20



For the Associate in Arts Degree Nursing Program:



Deter Clinic, Las Vegas - $35

Dr. Henry H. Luster, Las Vegas - $15

Nevada State Nurses Association - $1000

Dr. Robert M. Taylor, Las Vegas - $100

Dr. Harry E. Fightlin, Las Vegas - $25

Boulder City Hospital, Inc. - $100

Dr. Thomas S. White, Boulder City - $50

Dr. Jose H. Vidal, Las Vegas - $50

Dr. James J. Hamill, Las Vegas - $50

Dr. E. C. Freer, North Las Vegas - $100

Local Neon Company, Inc., North Las Vegas - $25

County Medical Society, Inc. - $5000 (Clark County)

Dr. K. E. Turner, North Las Vegas - $200

Clark County Women's Medical Auxiliary - $500

Sunrise Hospital, Inc., Las Vegas - $2000

Dr. and Mrs. J. B. Denman, Las Vegas - $100

North Las Vegas Hospital, Inc. - $1000



For the Center for Western North American Studies:



Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, New Mexico - 6 copies

of "Anatomy of the Nevada Test Site".

NTS News, AEC Contract Office, Las Vegas - 6 copies of

the "NTS News".

Dr. William Z. Park, Sutcliffe, Nevada - typescript copy

of his work "Shaminism in Western North America: A

Study in Cultural Relationships".

Mrs. W. H. Bishop, Reno - panorama photograph of

Rhyolite, Nevada, in 1907.

Mr. Grover L. Krick, Minden - copy of the "Nevada State

Bar Journal, 1939", containing his article "History

of the Douglas County Courthouse".



Grants



The Hancock Foundation, Reno - $500 for continuation of

cancer research under direction of Dr. Dean Fletcher, Allie

M. Lee Professor.



Reno Cancer Center, Inc. - $6000 representing the annual

grant in support of the Allie M. Lee Cancer Research Proj-

ect.



Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Bethesda,

Maryland - $4200 for research in mental health, "Nonreward

and Competing Responses" under the direction of Dr. R. Allen

Gardner of the Department of Psychology.



Department of Health, Eduction and Welfare, Washington,

D. C. - $2800 as a Traineeship Grant for the Orvis School

of Nursing.



National Science Foundation, Washington, D. C. - $4630 for

support of an "Undergraduate Instructional Scientific

Equipment Program" under the direction of Dean William D.

Carlson, Nevada Southern; and $31,066 for scientific pur-

poses under the program "Institutional Grants for Science

in 1964".



The Max C. Fleischmann Foundation of Nevada - $30,000 rep-

resenting the 9th, 10th and 11th increments of the Fleisch-

mann Foundation Matching Book Fund Program.



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Davis, carried

unanimously that the gifts be accepted and that the Secre-

tary send appropriate notes of thanks to the donors.



12. Placement Registration Fee



President Armstrong recommended approval of the following

change in existing Placement Registration Fee, as requested

by the Dean of Student Affairs, on the basis of discussions

with the Executive Vice President and the Deans in Student

Affairs, Agriculture, Arts and Science, Business Adminis-

tration, Education and Engineering (who have indicated no

ogjections as this service is optional).



1. Reduce the registration fee for teachers from the pres-

ent $5 per registrant to $3 per registrant effective

July 1, 1964.



2. Require the same $3 registration fee from all other

students and alumni who wish to register with the Place-

ment Office, effective July 1, 1964.



3. Require an additional $1 service charge from any of the

above registrants each time his credentials are re-

activated and updated, effective July 1, 1964.



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen, carried

unanimously to approve the above Placement Registration

Fee structure, effective immediately.



13. Class A Action - Special Examination



President Armstrong recommended approval of the following

Class A Action, as approved by the Academic Council and

the University Council:



A regular, currently registered student not on probation

who can provide evidence that he has achieved the objec-

tives and covered the subject matter content of a course

listed in the catalog as a result of having taken a com-

parable course in a non-accredited education institution

or by systematic, independent study or by directly per-

tinent occupational experience may take an examination in

that course for University credit. The student must obtain

permission to take the examination from his Adviser, the

Dean of the College in which the student is enrolled, the

Instructor of the course and the Chairman of the Department,

and Dean of the College in which the course is offered.

Forms are available in the Office of Admissions. A fee of

$15 per credit hour shall be charged.



The result of the examination, in the form of a letter grade

from A to F shall be sent by the Instructor to the Office

of Admissions together with the completed examination. The

examination shall be kept on file in the Registrar's Office

where it may be examined by any faculty member. The grade

shall be recorded on the permanent record and treated as

any other grade.



The grade for a special examination must be filed by mid-

semester in order for the student to receive credit in that

particular semester. Before the beginning of the final

examination period, a report of all special examinations

that have been given during the semester will be sent to

the Chairman of the University Council by the Registrar.



Additional restrictions upon the use of special examinations

are:



(a) The student must apply for and take special examin-

ations during the first year in which he is regis-

tered at the University of Nevada. The Dean of the

College in which the course is offered may waive

this requirement in exceptional cases in which the

student has developed his skill or knowledge of

the course since initial registration at the Uni-

versity of Nevada.



(b) Senior students are not eligible for credit by

special examination.



(c) A total of not more than 15 credits may be obtain-

ed by special examination.



(d) Credit earned by special examination is not con-

sidered resident credit.



(e) Credit by special examination cannot be obtained

in a course which covers at an elementary level

the subject matter of a more advanced course for

which the student has already received credit.



(f) Credit by special examintion cannot be attempted

in a particular course more than once.



(g) Credit by special examination may not be obtained

in any course failed by the student nor in a

course which the student has audited.



(h) Credit by special examination will not be allowed

to a foreign student in foreign language and lit-

erature courses given in his native tongue which

are numbered below 300.



Motion by Dr. Lombari, seconded by Mrs. Magee, carried

unanimously that the above Class A Action be approved.



14. Fee Charges, Foreign Students



President Armstrong recommended approval of the following

policies relative to foreign students, which have been

approved by the Foreign Student Sub-Committee, the Student

Affairs Board, the Foreign Student Adviser, the Dean of

Student Affairs, the Director of Admissions, the Business

Manager, and the Executive Vice Present:



(1) Undergraduate students registered for 7 or more credits

and all foreign students (undergraduate or graduate)

must pay a Student Health Service fee of $8 per semes-

ter.



Graduate students, or regular part-time students, may

use this service by payment of the $8 per semester fee.

The Health Service ... facilities available.



(2) A group policy providing a maximum of $500 insurance

per accident is available to all students at a cost of

$3.50 per semester. This insurance covers all acci-

dents, except while participating in inter-collegiate

athletics, or while in an automobile, truck or motor-

cycle, occurring on or off Campus from registration

day to the last day of the semester. Undergraduate

students taking 7 credits or more, and all foreign

students (undergraduate or graduate) who cannot sub-

mit evidence of comparable coverage under a current

policy, will be assessed the insurance fee unless a

properly signed waiver is obtained from the Office

of Student Affairs not later than one day prior to

registration day.



Motion by Mrs. Magee, seconded by Mr. Davis, carried

unanimously to approve the above policies.



15. Reorganziation - Statewide Services (General University

Extension)



President Armstrong recommended approval of the Proposed

Reorganization Plan which was presented to the Board at its

last meeting for study and later action.



On May 22, 1964, the Statewide Services Advisory Committee

completed its review of the sections of the report from

the Educational Planning Committee pertaining to Statewide

Services. The report here presented is a report from the

Committee, as well as certain detailed recommendations of

the Dean of Statewide Services, as noted.



PROPOSED REORGANIZATION PLAN FOR

STATEWIDE SERVICES



On May 22, 1964, the Statewide Services Advisory Committee

completed its review of the sections of the report from the

Educational Planning Committee pertaining to Statewide

Services. This is a report of the Committees', as well as

certain detailed recommendations of my own, in relation to

the organization and function of this division of the Uni-

versity of Nevada.



These recommendations will be classified under the following

headings:



I General Recommendations

II Evening Division

III Off-Campus Division

IV Continuing Education Division

V Technical Education Division

VI Correspondence Division

VII Summer Session

VIII Audio-Visual Communications

IX Associate Degree

X Summary



I. General Recommendations



The general recommendations refer to the overall

administration of Statewide Services and are im-

portant to its operation and understanding of the

program throughout the State of Nevada.



A. The name Statewide Services should be changed

to General University Extension. (Most of the

Universities and Colleges use this terminology

as does the National organization.)



B. A Dean should be the Administrator of General

University Extension and he should report di-

rectly to the President. (Approved by the Board

of Regents in the administrative reorganization

plan.)



C. The Dean of General University Extension should

be the Administrator of all programs normally

a part of General University Extension (many of

which are listed here) throughout the entire

State of Nevada. (At the present time some pro-

grams originate from the Nevada Southern Campus

which constitutes duplication of effort.)



D. A committee should be appointed to study the

feasibility of merging Cooperative Extension

and Statewide Extension to form a University

Extension Division. (An informal committee

has been meeting once a month since September

of 1963 to discuss this merger. Progress has

been made in more cooperation with County Agents

but no progress has been made in merging the two

divisions.)



E. Efforts should be made in the planning of perman-

ent facilities for continuing education, audio-

visual, radio, television, as well as a large

auditorium. (There are some plans along these

lines but they do not seem to be for the immed-

iate future.)



F. All courses and programs offered in Statewide

Services should have sufficient enrollment or

registration to cover all instructional costs

plus miscellaneous fees such as retirement and

NIC, and any indirect costs assessed against

that particular program. An Instructor may

teach a course with fewer persons than are nec-

essary to pay these costs but the salary should

be based on the total fees paid less the mis-

cellaneous costs, plus 10% indirect cost. (No

action taken.)



G. Waivers of fees should not be available in any

of the self supporting programs in any of the

divisions of Statewide Services. (No action

taken.)



These recommendations should not be interpreted to

cover any of the programs or activities of Cooper-

ative Extension.



II. Evening Division



The purpose of an evening division is to enable

qualified adults and high school graduates to con-

tinue their education primarily to upgrade them-

selves in their chosen vocation, or to receive a

College education which they have been unable to

obtain in the regular manner. Adult education

may take the form of a regularly planned program

which could lead to a degree; yet it can also take

the form of individual courses for cultural devel-

opment or of additional training in a particular

field. A student should not be precluded from com-

pleting a degree in the evening division programs,

but it is recognized that he should become a regular

student in order to derive the benefits of regular

students which he cannot otherwise obtain (counsel-

ing, advising, etc.). Therefore, the following

recommendations are made concerning evening division

programs on the University of Nevada Reno Campus.



A. Evening division courses should be classified

as those courses for which a faculty member re-

ceives extra compensation by letter of appoint-

ment issued by Statewide Services. All other

courses offered as a part of a faculty member's

regular load would be classified as a day course

regardless of the time at which such a course

would be offered. (Approved by the Academic

Council.)



B. A regular student who has paid the consolidated

fee may register in an evening division course

with the consent of his adviser and the Dean

of the College. Internal arrangements would be

made for payment of the fees to evening division.

Students wishing to enroll in courses which are

a part of a faculty member's regular load would

be expected to register through day school and

fees would be collected in the same manner as

for a regular student.



C. Special students, students carrying fewer than 7

semester hours of credit or equivalent in one

semester, but who register for both day and ev-

ening courses would be expected to pay the nec-

essary fees to both divisions but would register

in the regular day division registration. In-

ternal arrangement would be made for the identi-

fication and transfer of funds to the appropriate

account. (No action necessary.)



D. No limit is made on the number of credits a

student may earn in the special student category,

however a maximum of 15 semester credits only

are acceptable toward a baccalaureate degree.

Such students contemplating a degree program

should apply for official admission at the earli-

est possible date. (Approved.)



E. Any regular student taking courses in the eve-

ning division, whether undergraduate or graduate,

shall be assigned an adviser and shall have the

approval of that adviser before being accepted

in the evening division courses. Regular stu-

dents will be counted in the enrollment reports

of the Office of the Registrar. (No action

taken.)



F. Registration for evening division courses should

be a part of the registration procedure performed

as a function of the Office of the Registrar.

Evening division registration should be discon-

tinued the evening of the opening class in order

to determine if there is sufficient enrollment

to warrant holding such a class. Mail registra-

tion should be continued and encouraged. (No

action taken.)



G. Non-credit classes, currently a part of the eve-

ning division program, should be placed under

the category of continuing education. (No action

taken.)



H. The fees charged for evening division courses on

the Reno and Las Vegas Campuses should be $15 per

credit for graduate, undergraduate, resident and

non-resident students. (Approved.) Registration

for audit in a credit course should have the same

fee as that of a registration for credit. (No

action taken.)



I. Any student who wishes to do graduate work in

evening division must first be admitted to the

University of Nevada and show proof of their

acceptance prior to their registration for grad-

uate credit. Each applicant is responsible for

filing the required credentials with the Office

of Admissions, Reno, not later than three weeks

prior to the desired registration period. (Ap-

proved.)



J. At the present time, Statewide Services pays 10%

of its net income to the University General Fund.

The income from evening division enrollments has

not reched the point that salaries paid are

comparable to regular salaries. Until salaries

are on the same level in evening division as day

time salaries, it is believed that Statewide

Services should be exempt from this payment.

(No action taken.)



K. No courses shall be accepted for the evening

division program once the final proofs of the

class schedule for that period have been approv-

ed. (No action taken.)



L. All courses offered in the evening division

should have the approximate starting date as

those offered in the regular University program,

and should follow the rules and regulations of

the Universitty as well as the University cal-

endar. (No action necessary.)



M. The content of courses, as well as the instruc-

tion in these courses, shall be under the sup-

ervision of that College and Department in which

the course is offered. (No action necessary.)



N. Instructors who are not a regular members of the

faculty must have their qualifications to teach

a course approved by the Department and Dean of

the College in which the course is offered, and

the Graduate Dean if the course is to be offered

for graduate credit. (This practice is being

followed at present.)



O. Evening division students, upon payment of proper

fees, should be given a Library permit stamped

for use during that period of enrollment only.

(This practice is being followed at present.)



III. Off-Campus Division



Statewide Services, as the name implies, was develop-

ed to extend the opportunity of education from the

University of Nevada throughout the entire State.

Originally Las Vegas was a division of Statewide

Services. In recent years, with a different admin-

istrative organization, the question has arisen as

to which Campus should direct the off-campus pro-

grams in the Southern part of the State. It would

seem rather difficult to justify the expenditure of

funds necessary to duplicate personnel and operations

to have two Statewide Service programs when the one

division can serve both areas. Therefore, the fol-

lowing recommendations concerning off-campus evening

division are:



A. All off-campus courses offered beyond the bound-

aries of the Reno or Las Vegas resident Campuses,

except those courses which are a part of the

regular day program, should be under the admin-

istration of the Dean of Statewide Services.

(No action taken.)



B. Off-campus courses starting later than six weeks

after the beginning of the semester, or courses

ending after the close of the semester, will be

posted to the permanent record at the close of

the following semester. Students shall be noti-

fied prior to registration that transcripts will

not be available until the end of the period in

which the registrations are officially recorded.

(No action taken.)



C. All courses offered off-campus must be approved

by the Department Chairman, Dean of the College

and, when applicable, the Graduate Dean. (This

procedure is being followed at present.)



D. In the areas closely associated with Nevada

Southern, permission to offer an off-campus

course must come from the division Chairman, the

Dean of Nevada Southern and, when applicable,

the Graduate Dean. (No action taken.)



E. Students in off-campus courses may use a maximum

of 9 semester credits of graduate work towards a

degree. (Reaffirmed by Graduate Committeee.)



F. Adequate Library facilities must be provided for

off-campus upper division courses or graduate

courses. If such facilities are not provided,

the Instructor, the Department Chairman, the

Dean of the College and, if applicable, the Grad-

uate Dean (in consultation with the Dean of

Statewide Services and the Director of Libraries)

may reserve the right to refuse permission to

offer such courses. (No action taken.)



G. No off-campus courses will be offered where a

student may earn more than one credit per week.

(This procedure is being followed at present.)



H. The off-campus programs are not able to serve

the needs of the communities at the present

time because of increased costs. As in other

divisions of Statewide Services, 10% of the net

profit has been charged as an indirect cost,

such funds going into the General Fund of the

University. It is believed this charge should

be dropped so there will be more money to sup-

port the program. (This charge has been reduced

to 5%.)



I. Statewide Services needs the authorization to

contract directly with students to establish

fees as necessary to cover the cost of operat-

ing a course in a community, for a government

agency or with industry plus a 10% indirect

cost, the latter charge to be used in initating

new programs and raising salaries. (To the

Board of Regents for action.)



J. Statewide Services needs the authorization to

contract with Boards of Education, government

agencies, or industry for them to underwrite the

costs of offering courses plus a minimum of 10%

for indirect costs. The charges made would be

based on actual costs less student fees. (To

the Board of Regents for action.)



K. The salaries paid in off-campus Summer Sessions

should vary from those paid to resident Summer

Session Instructors since many of their costs

increase away from their residence. It is there-

fore proposed that salaries for in-state teaching

personnel be:



$200 per credit - 90 miles one way

$225 per credit - 91 - 200 miles one way

$250 per credit - over 200 miles one way



In addition, the above mentioned personnel would

be provided with a University vehicle when avail-

able, or paid at the rate of 7 cents per mile

round trip mileage for use of their own vehicles.



Out-of-state personnel would be paid 1/2 1st

class air fare from place of residence to the

teaching center, plus a salary of $250 per

credit. (Approved.)



L. Appropriated funds should be provided to support

the off-campus programs in the State of Nevada.

(No action taken.)



IV. Continuing Education



The title Special Projects and Institutes has been

used to cover a multitude of oeprations in a very

broad program. However, continuing education is one

of the more important aspects of an institution of

higher education since it is essential that most

people continue their education because of techno-

logical advances. Certificates would be issued on

successful completion of these programs.



A. Non-Credit Courses



Non-credit courses shall be defined as College-

level, or post high school courses that are

creditable toward a certificate or for the bene-

fit of an individual or group of individuals,

but do not carry credit towards an associate,

bachelor's or higher degree.



1. Non-credit courses may be offered at anytime

without regard to University registration

regulations. (This practice is being follow-

ed at present.)



2. The periods of instruction should be based on

credit hours for the purpose of defining sal-

ary. (This practice is being followed at

present.)



3. Fees charged for such courses shall be based

on estimated enrollment, salary for instruc-

tional staff, and indirect costs involved in

each individual course. (This practice is

being followed at present.)



4. Registration, collection of fees, and record

keeping shall be the responsibility of State-

wide Services. (This practice is being fol-

lowed at present.)



B. Conferences, Institutes, Workshops



Conferences, institutes and workshops are organ-

ized programs which may vary in approach or oper-

ation but basically have an educational format.

They may be financed through government grants,

private foundations, or fees charged partici-

pants. They are, however, for the most part a

continuing educational function.



1. All programs of this type on the Reno Campus

should be under the administration of the

Dean of Statewide Services. (To the Board

of Regents for action.)



2. All requests for these programs should be

made to Statewide Services and shall be sub-

ject to approval of the President. (To the

Board of Regents for action.)



3. Budgeting and financial arrangements should

be handled through the Office of Statewide

Services. (To the Board of Regents for

action.)



4. The Office of Statewide Services shall assume

responsibility for details on housing, meals,

registration, collection of fees, etc., ex-

cept when such progrms carry University cred-

it and then the collection of fees and regis-

tration shall be the responsibility of the

Office of the Registrar. (To the Board of

Regents for action.)



5. When such programs are financed by monies

wholly or in part from outside the Univer-

sity, indirect cost charges shall be admin-

istered by the Dean of Statewide Services.

(To the Board of Regents for action.)



6. Funds allotted to the indirect cost accounts

should be utilized:



(a) to stimulate and support desirable and

needed special programs which cannot be

supported, at least initially, from any

other source of funds.



(b) for equipment and instructional mater-

ials not provided for in grants, con-

tracts or departmental budgets.



(c) special needs for the implementation of

on-going programs. (To the Board of

Regents for action.)



C. Special Programs



Many institutions consider English "A" remedial

reading, reading improvement, study skill pro-

grams as a part of a special programs service.

At the present time, at least, it is believed

these programs, especially for entering students,

should be placed in the category of non-credit

courses and accordingly administered.



V. Technical Education



Technical Education differs from regular University

degree programs not from the standpoint of the level

of instruction but from the approach taken in teach-

ing such programs. University degree programs are

basically designed to teach theory and to develop

the abilities of a student to put this theory to work

with particular emphasis on planning and organiza-

tion. Technical education tends to approach the

practical or to teach an individual to do a speci-

fic task by relating the theory to that particular

program. Technical education should be separated

as much as possible (at least at this time) from

the degree programs of higher education but not to

the degree of lessening their quality of instruc-

tion. Therefore, the following recommendations are

made concerning technical education:



A. The requirements for faculty members in tech-

nical education differ from the requirements

of faculty members on regular academic status.

Therefore, the selection of these persons

should be a decision of the Director of Tech-

nical Education and the Dean of Statewide

Services in consultation with the President in

accordance with Federal and State regulations.

(No action taken.)



B. The Dean of Statewide Services should be the

administrative head of all post high school tech-

nical education courses or programs offered in

the State of Nevada by the University. This is

to insure that all programs or courses will re-

ceive equal recognition, have the same standards,

and can be supervised by one person, the Director

of Technical Education. (No action taken.)



C. Advisory committees should be established for

courses and programs, but such advisory commit-

tees should be on a voluntary basis, and no

financial benefits should be derived from such

an appointment. (This practice is being follow-

ed at present.)



D. Until such time as physical facilities are avail-

able for technical education programs, Univer-

sity, public school or other suitable facilities

should be used for instruction. It is not deemed

wise at this time to use University housing fa-

cilities, but there is no reason to believe that

student union and dining facilities could not be

used upon payment of proper fees. (No action

taken.)



E. Every attempt should be made, as soon as funds

are available, to develop associate degree pro-

grams of a technical nature, but until such time

they should remain as certificate programs. (No

action taken.)



VI. Correspondence Division



The Correspondence Division of the University of

Nevada has been in existence for many years. It is

expecially important to many people in this partic-

ular State who live in isolated communities where

they have no other higher education opportunities.

It is also a very valuable public relations asset

to the University.



Since 1955 all of the correspondence courses have

been revised or rewritten so they are more equivalent

in content to regular courses of instruction. All of

the courses are supervised and lessons graded by

faculty members. Many new courses have been develop-

ed to offer a wider range of selection to meet the

needs of persons interested.



Although the Educational Planning Committee report

disclosed some concern about correspondence, it is

believed that it is very important to the Univer-

sity and the people it serves and it would be a

great disservice to discontinue it until some other

method is found to provide this type of education.

Until such a method is found to replace correspond-

ence courses, the following recommendations are made

to insure quality education:



A. Studies should be made of possibilities of fur-

ther supplementing correspondence courses with

programmed instruction materials, taped lectures,

recordings, and the use of other audio-visual

materials. (Internal - no action necessary.)



B. Correspondence courses should be supplemented

in local areas by the use of radio and tele-

vision where available. (Internal - no action

necessary.)



C. Group-study correspondence courses should be

developed whereby courses would be supplemented

by actual guidance and instruction through per-

iodic visits by faculty members. Some adjust-

ments in fees might be necessary to provide this

service. (No action taken.)



D. Credit courses produced by other educational

institutions or network educational television

programs for credit should be handled through

the Correspondence Division. Approval from the

Department and College concerned should be ob-

tained. (No action taken.)



E. The position of administrative head of the Cor-

respondence Division should be upgraded to a

position of Director and, accordingly, report

to the Dean of Statewide Services. (Approved.)



F. A committee should be appointed to study the role

of correspondence courses in the degree program

and in doing so should review the number of

credits allowable towards a degree. (No action

taken.)



VII. Summer Session



At one time the Summer Session was basically a pro-

gram for the benefit of in-service teacher training.

In the Summer of 1963 at the University of Nevada,

less than half of those persons taking courses were

in-service teachers. With no funds being directly

appropriated for Summer Session it is difficult to

obtain faculty when they can be assured of other

employment as well as to offer a well rounded pro-

gram. With the changing picture of Summer programs,

the following recommendations are made:



A. A committee should be appointed to study the year

round operation of the University as well as

Summer Session. (Committee has been appointed.)



B. Until such time as the University is operating a

year round program the Dean of Statewide Services

should be the administrative head of Summer Ses-

sion. If a year round operation should be pro-

posed, study should be made as to a program for

in-service teachers and where it should be ad-

ministered. (No action taken.)



C. Approval of courses for Summer Session should be

obtained in the same manner as for evening di-

vision courses.



D. Special programs, workshops, clinics, etc.,

should be established in the departments where

needed to provide in-service education for

teachers.



E. A study needs to be made of Summer Session sal-

aries, including the instruction, administration

of workshops, institutes, etc., and methods of

guaranteeing employment. (No action taken.)



VIII. Audio-Visual Communications Division



The Audio-Visual Center is an integral part of the

educational program of a University. It can provide

teaching material, equipment and services necessary

to make the teaching program more effective. Through

its facilities, new methods of teaching and increased

effectiveness of teaching may be developed. Follow-

ing are the recommendations concerning audio-visual:



A. The audio-visual communications division should

be under the administration of the Dean of State-

wide Services. (Approved.)



B. The Director of the Audio-Visual Center shall

also be responsible for all educational tele-

vision and radio. (Approved.)



C. Increased financial support must be given to

this area to meet the challenge of increased

enrollments, changing teaching methods and

needs of faculty. (No action taken.)



IX. Associate Degrees



In August, 1960 the Board of Regents adopted a plan

previously approved by the faculty and Administra-

tion for diploma and certificate programs. A cer-

tain number of certificate programs are already in

operation, especially in the technical education

area. However, because of the University of Nevada's

unique position in higher education in the State of

Nevada it is believed these programs should be de-

veloped as rapidly as possible to serve the needs of

students who are not financially able or are not in-

terested in 4 or more years of academic life. There-

fore, the following recommendations are made:



A. The Associate of Arts and the Associate of Sci-

ence degrees should be instituted at the Univer-

sity of Nevada as the University's "diploma

program". (No action taken.)



B. All programs currently being provided and all

future programs which are less than 4 years

should be under the administration of the Dean

of Statewide Services. (No action taken.)



C. All associate degree programs will be developed

by the Dean of Statewide Services in consultation

with faculty members and Deans concerned with

that particular program. (No action taken.)



D. Such programs may carry academic credit for all

courses offered although in many instances of a

specialized nature this may not be true. (No

action taken.)



E. Diplomas issued on successful completion of the

program will specify the area in which special-

ization took place, i. e., Nursing, Electronics,

etc. The diplomas will be awarded by the Uni-

versity of Nevada. (No action taken.) 396.580

now requires the diploma to be issued by Depart-

ments.



F. Students having completed successfully courses

having University credit may use these courses

in cases where they wish to continue in a 4 year

degree program. (No action taken.)



X. Summary



In this report has been incorporated the recommenda-

tions of the Statewide Services Advisory Committee

after careful evaluation of the Educational Planning

Committee Report.



In addition, certain recommendations have been made

by myself which I believe will assist in the opera-

tion of Statewide Services in maintaining high aca-

demic standards and to provide more educational

opportunity to the people of the State of Nevada.



Submitted by,



Dr. J. Patrick Kelly

Dean, Statewide Services



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Dr. Lombardi, that the

reorganization plan be approved, including name change, ef-

fective immediately. Passed unanimously.



16. Personnel Recommendations (continued)



The Board went into Executive Session at 11:45 A.M. with

all Regents, the President and the Secretary present.



Dr. Armstrong again recommended approval of the personnel

recommendations.



Motion by Dr. Anderson, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen, carried

unanimously that the personnel recommendations be approved

as follows:



ADMINISTRATION



Appointment as follows:



Ralph A. Irwin as Acting Executive Vice President, effec-

tive July 1, 1964 at a salary of $150 per month (in addi-

tion to regular contract salary) to continue until Chancel-

lor, Reno Campus is appointed.



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE



Appointments as follows:



Paula Sue Richardson as Assistant Professor of Home Econom-

ics at a salary of $8370 for the academic year 1964-65 (re-

placement for Julianne Chancerelle).



Alice Chapman Gaston as Assistant Research Home Economist

at a salary of $1200 for the period July 1 to August 31,

1964.



Lyle G. Mc Neal as Graduate Assistant in Animal Science at

a salary of $3450 based on twelve months' service, effective

September 1, 1964 (replacement for Gary Bischoff).



Marcelo Mario Quevedo as part-time Lecturer in Animal

Science at a salary of $920 for the period July 1 to August

31, 1964.



Neill West as Junior Animal Scientist at a salary of $540

for the period July 1-31, 1964.



Truman W. Whorton as 4-H Club Camp Caretaker at a salary of

$1177 for the period June 13 to September 6, 1964.



James Jack Murray as Graduate Assistant in Plant Science at

a salary of $3450 based on twelve months' service, effective

September 1, 1964 (replacement for Larry Killinger).



Thomas William Townsend as Graduate Assistant in Plant

Science at a salary of $3450 based on twelve month's service

effective July 1, 1964 (replacement for Thomas A. Kelly).



Gordon Kenney Harris as Lecturer in Plant Science at a sal-

ary of $1000 for the period July 1 to August 31, 1964.



Laurence Leroy Killinger as Graduate Assistant in Plant

Science at a salary of $1000 for the period July 1 to

August 31, 1964.



Change in Status as follows:



Donald Herbert Heinze from Graduate Research Assistant in

Plant Science to Lecturer in Range Ecology at a salary of

$6480 for the academic year 1964-65 (funds contributed by

Bureau of Land Management).



Curtis Lee Probert from Graduate Research Assistant to

Graduate Assistant (3/4 time) in Animal Science at a salary

of $5625 based on twelve months' service, effective July 1,

1964.



Marcel Mario Quevedo from Lecturer in Animal Science to

Graduate Assistant in Animal Science at a salary of $3450

based on twelve month's service, effective September 1,

1964 (replacement for Syed Saiduddin).



Roger William Benton from Research Technician to Graduate

Assistant (3/4 time) in Plant Science at a salary of $5625

based on twelve months' service, effective July 1, 1964.



Leave of Absence as follows:



Daniel W. Cassard, Professor of Animal Science, for the

period August 10 to September 13, 1964, without pay, in

order that he might serve as a consultant for the IRI Re-

search Institute on agricultural problems of Brazil.



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCE



Appointments as follows:



Hyung Kyu Shin as Assistant Professor of Chemistry at a

salary of $3888 for the Spring semester 1964-65 (replace-

ment for Brahama Sharma).



Edward L. Hancock as Instructor in English at a salary of

$6800 for the academic year 1964-65 (replacement for Joseph

Ferguson).



Jutta Eva Passler as Instructor in Foreign Languages at a

salary of $6200 for the academic year 1964-65 (replacement

for Professor Melz while on sabbatical leave).



Mary Louise Mc Girk as Instructor in Health, Physical Edu-

cation and Recreation at a salary of $6200 for the academic

year 1964-65 (replacement for Janice Crooks).



Robert Edward Donlan as Graduate Assistant in Health, Phys-

ical Education and Recreation at a salary of $2300 for the

academic year 1964-65 (replacement for Charles H. Walker).



John A. Halvorson as Assistant Professor of Military Sci-

ence, effective upon his report for duty in October, 1964

(replacement for Major Noel E. Craun).



Robert Phillip Rosenbaum as Graduate Assistant in Physics

at a salary of $2300 for the academic year 1964-65 (re-

placement for Patrick E. Ferguson).



Frederick Sontag as Graduate Assistant in Physics at a sal-

ary of $2300 for the academic year 1964-65 (replacement

for Lester C. Tilson).



Allen Mc Lellan as Graduate Assistant in Physics as a sal-

ary of $2500 for the academic year 1964-65 (unfilled posi-

tion).



Philip L. Altick as Assistant Professor of Physics (1/2

time) at a salary of $800 for the period July 1 to August

31, 1964.



Lester Johnson Hunt as Graduate Assistant in Psychology

at a salary of $2500 for the academic year 1964-65 (re-

placement for Santo J. Tarantino).



Richard Roald Newton as Graduate Assistant in Psychology

at a salary of $2300 for the academic year 1964-65 (new

position).



Thomas Edward Overbaugh as Graduate Assistant in Psychology

assigned to Psychological Service Center (temporary) at a

salary of $2300 for the academic year 1964-65 (new posi-

tion).



E. Neal Moore as Assistant Professor of Physics (1/2 time)

at a salary of $848 for the period July 1 to August 31,

1964.



K. Peter Etzkorn as Assistant Professor of Sociology and

Anthropology at a salary of $8300 for the academic year

1964-65 (new position).



Lucretia Joan Guerin as part-time Lecturer in Sociology

at a salary of $525 for the Fall semester 1964-65 (re-

placement for Howard Senter).



Larry Lee Hines as Instructor in Speech and Drama (tempo-

rary) at a salary of $6500 for the academic year 1964-65

(replacement for Dr. Miller while on sabbatical leave).



Donald E. Pickering as Professor of Developmental Biology

and Director of Laboratories of Human Development at a

salary of $11,458 based on twelve months' service (part-

time) effective July 15, 1964 (new position wholly support-

ed by research funds).



Hyrum Plaas as Assistant Professor and Director of Bureau

of Governmental Research, Department of Political Science

at a salary of $2128 for the period June 15 to August 31,

1964.



Fred E. Reno as Graduate Assistant in the Bureau of Govern-

mental Research at a salary of $920 for the period July 1

to August 31, 1964.



Reappointment as follows:



Wilbur Arthur Davis as Assistant Professor of Sociology

and Anthropology (1/2 time) at a salary of $3590 for the

academic year 1964-65.



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION



Appointments as follows:



Charles A. Hedges as Assistant Professor of Economics at

a salary of $8700 for the academic year 1964-65 (vacant

position).



Ronald A. Johnson as Graduate Assistant in Finance (1/4

time) at a salary of $1150 for the academic year 1964-65

(replacement for Ray E. Roberts).



Charles A. Hedges as Research Economist at a salary of $450

for the period August 19 to September 8, 1964.



Robert Kirk Coe as Associate Professor of Management at a

salary of $10,065 for the academic year 1964-65 (replace-

ment for Frank Greenwood).



Brian Dale Raine as Graduate Assistant in Marketing (1/4

time) at a salary of $1150 for the academic year 1964-65.



Stanley J. Trinaystich as Graduate Assistant in Marketing

(contingent upon admission to graduate school) at a salary

of $1150 (1/4 time).



DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE



Appointments as follows:



Annette Ezell as Graduate Research Assistant at a salary of

$2300 for the academic year 1964-65 (replacement for Fred-

erick Reno).



Eleanore Bushnell as Research Professor at a salary of $500

for the period August 1-31, 1964.



Clinton M. Case as Graduate Research Assistant at a salary

of $920 for the period July 15 to September 15, 1964.



Carl W. Backman as Associate Professor of Research at a

salary of $2305.56 for the period July 1 to August 31, 1964.



Philip Bettler as Research Associate at a salary of $2346

for the period July 1 to August 31, 1964.



Paul Boeyink as Grduate Research Assistant at a salary of

$1100 for the period June 1 to August 31, 1964.



John P. Chisholm as Research Assistant (professional) with-

out pay for the period June 15 to October 15, 1964.



William W. Dudley, Jr. as Research Assistant at a salary of

$1575 for the period June 15 to September 16, 1964.



Larry R. Eaton as Graduate Research Assistant at a salary

of $1080 for the period July 1 to August 30, 1964.



Annette Ezell as Graduate Research Assistant at a salary

of $920 for the period July 1 to August 30, 1964.



Robert N. Farvolden as Research Associate in Hydrogeology

at a salary of $3000 for the period June 1 to August 31,

1964.



Gerald P. Ginsburg as Assistant Professor of Research at

a salary of $1200 for the period July 1 to August 31, 1964.



George A. Jeffs as Research Associate (1/3 time) at a salary

of $889.32 for the period June 1 to August 31, 1964.



Owen Portwood as Research Assistant at a salary of $600 for

the period July 1 to August 31, 1964.



John B. Rogan as Associate Professor at a salary of $1860

for the period June 1 to July 31, 1964.



Elmer R. Rusco as Research Assistant Professor at a salary

of $500 for the period June 23 to July 28, 1964.



Don A. Schweitzer as Research Assistant at a salary of $500

for the period July 1 to August 31, 1964.



Paul F. Secord as Research Professor at a salary of $2795

for the period July 1 to August 31, 1964.



Richard C. Sill as Research Associate in Physics at a salary

of $1177 for the period July 1 to August 1, 1964.



Jessica Sledge as Graduate Assistant at a salary of $1380

for the period June 1 to August 31, 1964.



Santo J. Tarantino as Graduate Assistant in Psychology at

a salary of $800 for the period July 1 to August 31, 1964.



Homer Clifton Wilkins as Research Associate at a salary of

$2500 for the period July 1 to August 31, 1964.



John Williamson as Graduate Research Assistant at a salary

of $920 for the period July 1 to September 1, 1964.



Ruth Meserve Houghton as Graduate Research Assistant (3/4

time) at a salry of $1035 for the period June 25 to

September 20, 1964.



Thomas A. Burns as Counselor and Administrative Assistant

in Summer Science Training Program in Field Ecology at a

salary of $800 for the period June 12 to July 24, 1964.



William L. Haskell as Lecturer-Counselor for NSF Summer

Science Training Program in Field Ecology at a salary of

$800 for the period June 14 to July 17, 1964.



Wayne Suttles as Associate Professor and Consultant to

Summer Field Training Program for Anthropologists at a

salary of $942.41 for the period August 1-31, 1964.



Donald G. Cooney as Lecturer in the Summer Science Training

Program in Field Ecology at a salary of $100 for the period

June 9-10, 1964.



Sven Liljeblad as Consultant to Summer Field Training Pro-

gram for Anthropologists at a salary of $1223 for the

period July 1-31, 1964.



John H. Marean as Lecturer in the Summer Science Training

Program in Field Ecology at a salary of $50 for the period

July 1-2, 1964.



Hugh N. Mozingo as Lecturer in the Summer Science Training

Program in Field Ecology at a salary of $100 for the period

June 29-30, 1964.



Reappointment as follows:



Richard Trealease as Graduate Research Assistant at a sal-

ary of $3500 based on twelve months' service, effective

July 1, 1964.



Change in Status as follows:



Edwin X. Berry from Research Assistant in Atmospheric

Physics (technical) to Research Assistant (professional)

at a salary of $6836 based on twelve months' service,

effective July 1, 1964.



Beatrice T. Gardner from Research Associate of the Behavor-

ial Science Center without pay to a salary of $8800 based

on twelve months' service, effective May 1, 1964.



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION



Appointment as follows:



Edmund J. Cain as Dean and Professor of Education at a sal-

ary of $18,000 based on twelve months' service, effective

September 1, 1964 (replacement for Garold Holstine).



LIBRARY



Appointments as follows:



Maurica G. Osborne as Life Science Librarian at a salary

of $6480 based on twelve months' service, effective July 1,

1964 (new position).



Jane Elizabeth Howard as Acting Assistant Catalog Librarian

(1/2 time) at a salary of $248.80 for the period July 6-31,

1964.



Mrs. Gerhard Mohr as Consultant on V and T papers at a

salary of $50 per day for 3 days maximum between July 1-10,

1964.



Christiane Markwell as Circulation Assistant at a salary of

$293.76 for the period June 8 to July 1, 1964.



Eleanor Madeline Stevens as Technical Assistant in Binding

at a salary of $165.30 for the period June 16 to July 1,

1964.



MACKAY SCHOOL OF MINES



Appointments as follows:



John A. Johnson as Assistant Professor of Geography at a

salary of $8073 for the academic year 1964-65 (replacement

for Richard Sands).



Eugene Paul Zeizel as Graduate Assistant in Geology-Geog-

raphy at a salary of $2300 for the academic year 1964-65

(new position).



Richard F. Houzvicka as Research Assistant in Seismology

at a salary of $1650 for the period July 13 to October 13,

1964.



Frank Grant Leavitt as Seismological Assistant and Graduate

Assistant in Geology-Geography at a salary of $2550 based

on twelve months' service, effective July 1, 1964.



John K. Sales as Graduate Assistant in Geology-Geography

(1/4 time) at a salary of $1350 for the academic year

1964-65.



C. E. Price as Lecturer in Metallurgy at a salary of $8964

for the academic year 1964-65 (replacement for John S.

Winston, who will be on leave of absence for two years).



Ray Victor Tilman as Temporary Laboratory Assistant at a

salary of $800 for the period July 1 to September 1, 1964.



Leave of Absence as follows:



Joseph Lintz, Jr., Associate Petroleum Geologist, Nevada

Bureau of Mines; and Associate Professor of Geology, Mackay

School of Mines, for 6 to 8 weeks, with pay, in order that

he might serve as a Distinguished Lecturer of the American

Association of Petroleum Geologists.



NEVADA SOUTHERN REGIONAL DIVISION



Appointments as follows:



Chad Michael Murvosh as Assistant Professor of Biology at

a salary of $7479 for the academic year 1964-65 (new

position).



Henry Aaron Bergolofsky as Associate Professor of Business

Administration at a salary of $8370 for the academic year

1964-65 (new position).



William Myer Alsup as Assistant Professor of Chemistry

(contingent upon completion of all requirements for the

Ph. D. degree by September 1, 1964) at a salary of $7336

for the academic year 1964-65 (replacement for Robert

Batch).



Irvin A. Christenson as Instructor in Mathematics at a

salary of $6916 for the academic year 1964-65 (replacement

for William Knight).



Yong Hyo Cho as Instructor in Political Science at a sal-

ary of $6712 for the academic year 1964-65 (replacement

for William Burns).



Ramzan Shaban Dossa as Lecturer in Sociology at a salary

of $3000 for the Fall semester 1964-65 (replacement of Anne

Fowler, who will be on leave of absence).



William Glen Bradley, Jr., as Lecturer in Biological Survey

Techniques at a salary of $160 for the period June 8 to

July 31, 1964.



Violet Bowers as Teacher-Laboratory Instructor for the X-Ray

Technology Program at a salary of $128 for the period Jan-

uary 30 to May 27, 1964.



Robert D. Cremer as Lecturer in History at a salary of $525

for the period September 17, 1964 to January 26, 1965.



Olive E. Faisy as Teacher-Coordinator in X-Ray Technican

Program at a salary of $6300 for the period July 1, 1964

to June 30, 1965.



Harrie F. Hess as Lecturer in Psychology at a salary of

$350 for the period September 17, 1964 to January 26, 1965.



Ramona Pence as Teacher-Laboratory Instructor in the X-Ray

Technology Program at a salary of $193 for the period

January 30 to May 27, 1964.



Richard P. Sorenson as Lecturer in Accounting at a salary

of $525 for the period of September 17, 1964 to January

26, 1965.



Bob F. Steere as Lecturer in Biology at a salary of $660

for the period June 8 to July 31, 1964.



Robert James Weber as Lecturer in Spanish at a salary of

$750 for the period June 8 to July 31, 1964.



Nelson N. Williams as Lecturer in Biology, and to collect

biological specimens at a salary of $1175 for the period

from June 8 to August 31, 1964.



ORVIS SCHOOL OF NURSING



Appointments as follows:



Barbee Jean Cassingham as Assistant Professor of Nursing

at a salary of $9331 based on twelve months' service, ef-

fective September 1, 1964 (replacement for Margaret

Aasterud).



Lydia Rugh Dougherty as Assistant Professor of Nursing at

a salary of $7182 for the academic year 1964-65 (replace-

ment for Juanita Smith).



Margaret Aasterud as Assistant Professor and Co-Director

of Investigative Unit at Washoe Medical Center at a salary

of $1675.82 for the period July 1 to August 31, 1964.



GENERAL UNIVERSITY EXTENSION



Appointments as follows:



Donald Paul Sondel as Radiological Monitoring Instructor

at a salary of $8618 based on twelve months' service, ef-

fective July 1, 1964 (new position).



Benjamin L. Smith as Associate Professor of Accounting at

a salary of $1140 for the period May 21 to October 26, 1964.



Rosaline Weaver as Instructor in Accounting at a salary of

$660 for the period July 22 to August 26, 1964.



Richard S. Guerin as Instructor in English at a salary of

$900 for the period July 22 to August 26, 1964.



W. Keith Macy as Director of Music Concerts at a salary

of $430 for the period June 16 to July 21, 1964.



W. Keith Macy as Director of the Choral Clinic at a salary

of $430 for the period July 22-31, 1964.



Alex Simirenko as Assistant Professor of Sociology at a

salary of $165 for the period July 22 to August 26, 1964.



Peter K. Etzkorn as Associate Professor of Sociology at a

salary of $1140 for the period July 22 to August 26, 1964.



40 appointments in the Summer Session 1964.



7 appointments in the Off-Campus Program 1964.



17. Chemical Engineering



President Armstrong discussed the proposal saying that

interest in such a program has been increasing throughout

the State. At his request, during the past year the faculty

of the Mackay School of Mines and the College of Engineering

have been developing a program in the field. The question

arose as to where the program would be located. It was then

decided to bring in a committee of outside consultants to

study the situation. Deans Anderson and Scheid agreed upon

the committee membership as follows: Henry S. Curtis, Plant

Manager, American Potash & Chemical Corporation, Henderson;

Professor Richard M. Edwards, Department of Chemical Engi-

neering, University of Arizona; Professor R. F. Heckman,

Department of Chemical Engineering, South Dakota School of

Mines and Technology; Professor Lloyd Berg, Montana State

College. The committee spent two days on the Campus before

making the report. Subsequently Deans Anderson and Scheid

met with the faculties concerned and developed the curri-

culum. A minimum amount of equipment would be needed for

the next 4 or 5 years. In accordance with the recommenda-

tion of the committee, there would be joint appointments

of faculty in Nuclear Engineering and Metallurgical Engi-

neering.



On the above basis, and on the very clear evidence of the

need of such a program, President Armstrong recommended its

implementation beginning with the Fall of this year, as

follows:



1. The initial faculty of the Department of Chemical and

Metallurgical Engineering shall consist of Professors

Butler, Dickinson, and Winston; Associate Professors

Bowdish and Hammond; and Assistant Professors Miller

and Vincent. The faculty of the Department of Nuclear

Engineering shall consist of Professors Bowdish,

Dickinson and Miller.



2. Certain faculty members will have dual appointments and

dual responsibilities in the Department of Nuclear

Engineering and the Department of Chemical and Metallur-

gical Engineering. The concept of dual appointments as

used here, means that faculty members having dual ap-

pointments will have the same privileges and responsi-

bilities as the full-time members of the Departments.

The responsibility of Professor Bowdish to the Depart-

ment of Nuclear Engineering will be that of teaching

courses assigned to him under Chemical Engineering,

which the Department of Nuclear Engineering chooses to

cross-list. Approximately 1/5 to 1/4 of the time of

Professor Dickinson and of Professor Miller will be

assigned to the Department of Chemical and Metallurgical

Engineering for the purpose of teaching Chemical Engi-

neering courses and assisting in the planning and oper-

ation of the Department.



3. The administration and control of the budget shall lie

with the Department of Chemical and Metallurgial Engi-

neering under the supervision of Dean Scheid, with the

consultation of Dean Anderson.



4. Following the guide lines suggested by the American

Institute of Chemical Engineers, the curriculum in

Chemical Engineering was developed through conferences

among faculty members from several departments of the

University. An initial curriculum has been agreed

upon by the faculty members in the proposed Chemical

and Metallurgical Engineering Department and is at-

tached. The curriculum will be studied during the

coming year to make possible improvements.



5. The Department is prepared to accept students immedi-

ately in Chemical Engineering and we recommend, con-

tingent upon approval by the Board of Regents, that

it be permitted to enroll students beginning in Sep-

tember, 1964.



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Dr. Anderson, carried

unanimously to approve the recommendation.



18. Proposed Natural History Reservation, Nevada Southern



Following previous action of the Board, Dr. Armstrong asked

Dean Carlson and the members of the Biology Department to

negotiate with the Bureau of Land Management and others

concerning the acquisition of such land. Upon receipt of

the opinion from the Office of the Attorney General that

the University may acquire property if it does not use

State funds, the Administration proceeded to investigate

the proposal, with the view to using non-appropriated funds

to begin the process of acquisition.



No action was taken by the Regents, and the Administration

was asked to contact Mr. Bowman, rancher, who holds water

rights which allow the use of a portion of the available

water for his cattle and some limited irrigation, for a

statement as to whether or not he is agreeable to the Uni-

versity acquiring the property for a Natural History Reser-

vation. It was agreed also that Dean Carlson and his staff

continue to search for other suitable sites.



19. Resolution, Dr. Young



President Armstrong proposed the following resolution:



RESOLUTION #64-8



WHEREAS, Dr. Kenneth E. Young has, during the past

four years, served the University of Nevada with

distinction and integrity as Executive Vice President;

and



WHEREAS, this service was rendered to the University

during a particularly dynamic period of its growth,

contributing materially to that growth; and



WHEREAS, Dr. Young has now been chosen to serve as

President of Cortland State College, New York, re-

flecting great credit upon himself and upon the

University of Nevada.



NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Regents

of the University of Nevada that sincere thanks and

appreciation be extended to Dr. Kenneth E. Young

for his devoted service to this University, and the

highest commendation and praise on his election to

a College Presidency, together with the sincere good

wishes of the Board of Regents for his success and

happiness in his new responsibilities.



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Dr. Anderson, carried

unanimously that the above resolution be adopted and that

the original be signed by each Regent, the President and

the Secretary to the Board, and forwarded to Dr. Young.



20. Next Meeting



The next meeting of the Board was set for 1:00 P.M. on

Friday, September 18, 1964, to continue on Saturday morn-

ing, September 19, in Reno.



The meeting adjourned at 1:35 P.M.



A. C. Grant

Chairman



Alice Terry

Secretary

07-24-1964