06/11/1965

UCCSN Board of Regents' Meeting Minutes
June 11-12, 1965








06-11-1965

Pages 403-482



UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA

BOARD OF REGENTS

June 11, 1965



The Board of Regents met in the President's Office on the Reno

Campus on Friday, June 11, 1965. Present were: Regents Davis,

Anderson, Grant, Hug, Jacobsen, Lombardi (for a portion of the

meeting), Magee, Ronzone and White; President Armstrong, Vice

President Humphrey and Mr. C. B. Tapscott of the Attorney Gen-

eral's Office. Mr. James Rogers and Mr. Ed Pine were present

for a portion of the meeting. Members of the Press were Mr.

Dromiack, Mr. Laxalt and Mrs. Glendon.



The meeting was called to order by Chairman Anderson at 9:10

A.M.



1. Minutes of Previous Meeting



Upon motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Grant and

unanimous vote, the minutes of the previous meeting were

approved as distributed.



2. Chairman Anderson announced that at each subsequent meet-

ing of the Board of Regents, a recess would be called dur-

ing the morning session to allow for a press conference.



3. Regent Grant spoke to the Board of his "deep appreciation

for the honor of being named to receive a Distinguished

Nevadan Award".



4. Report of the Plant and Property Committee Meeting of

May 17, 1965



Mr. Jacobsen presented the minutes of the meeting as fol-

lows:



An emergency meeting of the Plant and Property Committee

was held in the President's Office, Reno Campus, on Monday,

May 17, 1965. Present: Regents Anderson, Davis, Jacobsen,

Hug and Lombardi; President Armstrong, Vice President

Humphrey, Mr. James Rogers, Mr. Ed Pine, Mr. Richard Allen

and Mr. James Hancock.



The meeting was called to order by Chairman Jacobsen at

7:50 P.M.



(1) Mr. Hancock reported to the Committee on his contact

with Mr. Smutzer, the landscape architect who has been

retained to accomplish the master landscape plan for

the Nevada Southern Campus. Mr. Smutzer has suggested

that the University consider proceeding immediately

(without waiting for the completion of the master land-

scape plan) with a tree planting project. He suggests

that trees be selected and areas designated as soon as

possible so that planting can be accomplished in Sep-

tember and October of this year. The Committee agreed

that the Campus would benefit greatly by starting as

soon as possible and tentative plans were made to meet

with Mr. Smutzer while the Regents are in Las Vegas

for Commencement (June 14). In the meantime, Mr.

Hancock was asked to inform Mr. Smutzer of the Com-

mittee's plans and ask him to provide preliminary

plans to the Committee at that time.



(2) Reno City Master Plan - Mr. Jacobsen introduced Mr.

Richard Allen, Director of the Regional Planning Com-

mission. Mr. Allen was present to review with the

Committee the Master Plan for the City of Reno so

that the Regents would have an opportunity to evalu-

ate the effect of any proposed rezoning of land ad-

jacent to or near the Reno Campus or other University

property. There was much general discussion of the

map presented by Mr. Allen and the following action

was taken by the Committee:



a. Motion by Mr. Davis, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried

without dissenting vote that the Committee support

the Regional Planning Commission's proposal to re-

zone an area north of the Reno Campus to Industrial

Estates.



b. Motion by Mr. Davis, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried

without dissenting vote that the Committee recom-

mend to the Regional Planning Commission that the

Master Plan for the City of Reno reflect the rec-

ommendations of the Truckee Meadows Road and

Streets Master Plan as it concerns Sierra and

Virginia Streets, that is, that Sierra Street be-

come the expressway with Virginia Street serving

as a feeder or collector street.



c. Motion by Mr. Davis, seconded by Dr. Lombardi,

carried without dissenting vote that the Committee

recommend to the Regional Planning Commission that

consideration be given to incorporating North

Virginia Street into the University road system as

soon as possible.



d. Motion by Mr. Hug, seconded by Mr. Davis, carried

without dissenting vote that the Committee go on

record as being willing to cooperate with the

Regional Planning Commission in their efforts to

rezone an area, designated as that area from

Virginia to Evans and 9th Streets to the freeway,

south of the Campus, from its present zoning to

modified C-2. (Specific uses requested to be

excluded from this modified C-2 zone are shown

in attachment A.)



e. Concerning the proposed rezoning of an area from

8th Street to 11th Street, between Virginia and

Sierra Streets, motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded

by Mr. Hug, carried without dissenting vote that

the present Master Plan for the University be

followed with the exception of that area south of

the University (covered in item d. above) and

therefore the proposed rezoning be opposed.



f. Motion by Mr. Davis, seconded by Dr. Lombardi,

carried without dissenting vote that the Committee

approve the connection of 17th Street, Sparks, with

Pembrooke (as outlined and recommended by Univer-

sity Engineer's Office) so that the proposed road

to Hidden Valley would be at the south end of

the University Farm.



(3) Proposed Land Exchange, Nevada Southern - Mr. Hancock

presented a map showing proposed trade of 4.33 acres

of land belonging to Mr. Bernard Joseph for 2.85 gross

acres of land belonging to the University located south

of Harmon Avenue and west of right of way for Swenson

Street extended beyond the center of section line.

After discussion by the Committee, President Armstrong

recommended acceptance of the proposed trade.



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Davis, carried

without dissenting vote that the proposed trade as

presented by Mr. Hancock be approved.



(4) Mr. Hancock reported on progress of appraisals of land

around the Nevada Southern Campus as requested by the

Board of Regents at its meeting of May 8. It was

agreed that the University could participate in the

cost of these appraisals if necessary.



(5) President Armstrong presented to the Committee a let-

ter received from Mr. R. J. Ronzone concerning a pro-

posed rezoning of land south of the Nevada Southern

University Campus on the corner of Tropicana and Mary-

land Parkway. He expressed concern about its possible

effect on the University's future plans. Mr. Humphrey

explained that in early April the University had been

notified of the proposed change in zoning of the area

immediately south of the Campus fronting Maryland

Parkway. The zoning proposal had been reviewed at

the staff level and no exception taken since the area

was not in the Master Plan and was bounded by C-1

zoning. Mr. Humphrey was asked to communicate with

Mr. Ronzone by telephone to explain the matter.



(6) Mr. Humphrey and Mr. Rogers presented to the Committee

a map showing an area near the NSU Campus on which it

is planned to construct a building which would require

either a zoning change to M-1 or a variance. Mr.

Rogers pointed out that a variance in the existing

zoning regulations will permit them to construct the

building. He recommended that any request for zoning

change to M-1 be opposed but that a request for a

variance not be opposed.



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Davis, carried

without dissenting vote that the Board of Regents

oppose any effort to rezone the area to M-1 but to

take no action opposing an effort to obtain a variance

in the present zoning.



(7) A change in zoning is requested for an area east of

Campus, west of the railroad tracks and north of Orr

Ditch. This property is presently zoned R-1 and it is

proposed to change to R-3.



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Davis, carried

without dissenting vote that the Committee oppose the

rezoning on the basis that a change in zoning would be

in conflict with the Master Plan for the Reno Campus

as adopted by the Regents.



(8) A change in zoning is proposed for area of 93 feet

frontage at Sierra and Wallner from R-3 to R-5.



Motion by Mr. Davis, seconded by Dr. Lombardi, carried

without dissenting vote that the Regents oppose the

rezoning as proposed on the basis that it is not com-

patible with the desire of the University to ultimate-

ly connect Virginia Street with Sierra Street in that

area.



(9) Request from CSNS Regarding Student Union - A letter

from the President of the NSU student body has been

received requesting assistance by the Board of Regents

and the University Administration in acquiring a Stu-

dent Union for that Campus. Mr. Humphrey explained the

methods whereby this type of construction could be

financed by revenue bonds. The Committee agreed that

every assistance should be given the students in this

regard and that the students be asked for assistance

in developing a proposed scope of work for a Union.

President Armstrong recommended that Mr. Humphrey ex-

plore the methods of financing and develop data that

would show what could be expected for various amounts

of money. He further suggested that Dr. Moyer be

asked to appoint a Committee composed of NSU staff,

faculty and students to develop plans and to more

fully determine their needs and desires and reconcile

these with their financial ability.



Motion by Mr. Davis, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried with-

out dissenting vote that the President's recommendation

be approved.



(10) Stead Study Committee - The Committee agreed to visit

the Stead Air Force Base on Thursday, June 10, prior

to their Committee meeting scheduled for that day.

President Armstrong agreed to make arrangements for

the visit. Notices will be sent to all members of the

Board approximately two weeks before the visit so that

all who are interested may plan to attend.



The meeting adjourned at 10:10 P.M.



Plant and Property Committee Meeting, May 17, 1965, Attach-

ment A.



Specific Uses Requested to be Excluded from Modified C-2

Zone (See 2 d.).



Astrology Parlor

Auto Trailer Sales

Aviary

Bar or Cocktail Lounge

Billiard or Pool Hall

Bottling and Juice Manufacturing

Brooder House (Poultry)

Car Wash

Chicks (Sale of)

Dancing Academy or School

Feed and Grain Retail Sales

Fumigation and Sterilization Services

Glass Cutting and Staining

Liquor Store

Massage Parlor

Palmistry

Pet Shop

Reducing Salon

Saddlery or Saddle Making

Second Hand Dealer

Service Enterprises of All Kinds

Sign Painting Shop

Swimming Pool (Commercial)

Taxidermist

Tire Repair and Vulcanizing Shops

Trade School

Undertaking Parlor (No Crematory, Interment or Mortuary)



Action of the Board:



Item (1) Mr. Jacobsen informed the Board of the Commit-

tee's intention to meet with Mr. Smutzer at

2:00 P.M. on June 14 in Las Vegas.



Item (2) Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Davis,

that all action of Committee become action of

the Board, amended by motion of Mrs. Magee and

seconded by Mr. Jacobsen, that the wording in

Attachment A of item 2.d "Service enterprises

of all kinds" be changed to read "Service enter-

prises incompatible with University interests",

carried with Regents Davis, Grant and White

opposed.



Item (3) Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Ronzone,

carried with Mrs. White opposed, that the action

of the Committee be approved by the Board.



Item (4) No action by the Board.



Item (5) No action by the Board.



Item (6) Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Hug,

carried unanimously that the action of the Com-

mittee become the action of the Board.



Item (7) Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Davis,

carried unanimously that the action of the Com-

mittee be ratified by the Board.



Item (8) Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Ronzone,

carried unanimously that the action of the Com-

mittee be ratified by the Board.



Item (9) Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Davis,

carried unanimously that the action of the Com-

mittee become the action of the Board.



5. Report of the Plant and Property Committee Meeting of

June 10, 1965



Mr. Jacobsen presented the minutes of the meeting as fol-

lows:



The Plant and Property Committee met in the President's

Office on the Reno Campus on Thursday, June 10, 1965.

Present were: Regents Anderson, Davis, Grant, Jacobsen,

Hug, Magee and White; President Armstrong, Vice President-

Finance Humphrey, Engineer Rogers, Mr. Ed Pine and Mr.

William Hancock. Mr. Ed Parsons, architect for the Orvis

School of Nursing building, Mr. Webster Brown and Mr.

Milton Sharp of the Truckee Meadows Engineers, and Dr. Art

Broten and Mr. Dankworth of the University's Athletic De-

partment, were present for portions of the meeting.



The meeting was called to order at 9:20 A.M. by Chairman

Jacobsen.



(1) School of Nursing Building - Mr. Ed Parsons, archi-

tect for the Orvis School of Nursing building, was

present to present preliminary plans for the new

building. These plans have been reviewed and ap-

proved by the faculty committee of the Orvis School

of Nursing.



Motion by Mr. Grant, seconded by Mr. Davis, carried

without dissenting vote that the Committee approve

the preliminary plans for the Orvis School of Nursing

building as submitted.



(2) Wilbourn Land Gift - As instructed by the Committee

at its meeting of May 7, the minutes of the Board of

Regents and the files were researched to determine

what action, if any, the Board had taken concerning

the Wilbourn land transaction. This research dis-

closed the following:



Excerpts -- Board of Regents Minutes



Volume 7, Page 99 (February 14, 1955)



XI. Land - Las Vegas Area - Mr. and Mrs. Howard

R. Wilbourn came into the meeting at 3:25

P.M. Mrs. Wilbourn offered to the Board of

Regents a gift of 60 acres of land as the

site for a branch of the University of Nevada

in Las Vegas, the gift to be made as a memo-

rial to her mother, Mrs. Anita Julia Cornish,

who was an early pioneer of Nevada. In addi-

tion to the gift, Mrs. Wilbourn offered an

option on 20 additional adjoining acres of

land at $35,000.



President Stout recommended that the offer

of 60 acres be accepted with full apprecia-

tion of the gift and of what it means to the

youth of Southern Nevada; and that the option

on additional acres be accepted at $35,000

until June 30, 1956, to see if money can be

raised to purchase it. The President recom-

mended that in the first building construct-

ed on the site, there be a plaque in memory

of Mrs. Wilbourn's mother.



Motion by Mr. Grant, carried unanimously

that the offer of Mrs. Wilbourn be accepted,

both as to gift of land and option on addi-

tional land. Mr. Ross was authorized to sign

the papers on behalf of the Board of Regents.

Regent Grant paid the $1 called for in the

option.



.......................



Motion by Mr. Thompson carried unanimously

that the President write a letter to Mr. and

Mrs. Wilbourn, in care of Ernest Brown, At-

torney, notifying them officially of the

acceptance of their offer.



................................



February 15, 1955



Mrs. Estelle N. Wilbourn

c/o Ernest S. Brown

Attorney at Law

10 State Street

Reno, Nevada



Dear Mrs. Wilbourn:



At their meeting on February 14, 1955, the Board of

Regents of the University of Nevada accepted your

very generous offer of sixty acres of land in Clark

County, Nevada, described at NE 1/4; S 1/2 of the SE

1/2 of the NE 1/4 of Section 22, Township 21, Range

61 E. The papers for this have been signed and one

copy is in your possession.



The Board of Regents also accepted your offered option

on twenty additional acres adjoining above property

and described as N 1/2 of SE 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of

Section 22, Township 21S, Range 61 E, Clark County,

Nevada. One dollar in cash was paid to you and the

papers were signed, of which you have one copy.



The members of the Board of Regents asked me to ex-

press to you again their deep appreciation for what

you are doing for the University of Nevada and

through it for the coming generations of this State

and nation. This gift will serve as a living memo-

rial to your thoughtfulness and generosity as long

as there is a University of Nevada.



Very sincerely yours,



/s/ Minard W. Stout

President



................................



August 15, 1957



Mr. and Mrs. Howard B. Wilbourn

225 Mc Henry Avenue

Modesto, California



Dear Mr. and Mrs. Wilbourn:



We are preparing a plaque for the first University

building in Las Vegas in memory of your mother.



Will you please look at the wording, enclosed, and

let us know if you have any corrections or sugges-

tions.



Cordially yours,



/s/ Minard W. Stout

President



................................



225 Mc Henry Avenue

Modesto, California

August 28, 1957



President Minard W. Stout

University of Nevada

Reno, Nevada



Dear President Stout:



Please excuse my delay in returning the suggested

plaque to you. We have been away a few days on

vacation.



We have carefully considered the wording and believe

one or two changes might be proper. I am enclosing a

sheet showing the wording we prefer. We feel that

our first names should be used in preference to Mr.

and Mrs. Howard Wilbourne, and also the word "tract"

should be omitted. We hope these suggested changes

meet with your approval.



What will be the dimensions of the plaque and I am

hoping it will be a real nice one.



Have plans been made for the dedication of the build-

ing? Many of my family would like to attend and would

like to have as much advance notice as possible to

arrange their affairs so they might attend.



Thank you so much for your help and suggestions. I

would appreciate hearing further from you as to your

conclusions concerning the wording of the plaque.



Very sincerely yours,



/s/ Estelle M. Wilbourn



Noted: Approved

M. W. Stout



................................



Dr. Anderson presented the Committee the following

letter received from Mrs. Wilbourn dated May 27, 1965:



Dr. Fred Anderson

275 Hill Street

Reno, Nevada



Dear Dr. Anderson:



Thank you for your letter of May 14th.



At the time we were negotiating the gift of the 60

acres for the purpose of a University at Las Vegas,

and details being arranged, President Stout made a

voluntary statement to Mr. Wilbourn and myself in

the presence of his Secretary and some of the members

of the Regents and Dean Wm. Wood, that a building

would be named after my mother or me in appreciation

of the "wonderful thing we had done for the Univer-

sity and the residents of Las Vegas". I believe Dr.

Lombardi, Roy Hardy, former Chairman of the Board -

Silas Ross, and others were present. Former Dean

William Wood, during the negotiations for the gift

also stated he felt such action was appropriate and

would be done.



It seems to me such an action on the part of the

University should not be forced but that there should

be a strong feeling and desire by the Regents to see

that this is done. As I stated before my wish is

that the building be named after my mother. I have

no desire for personal prestige in the matter.



Many personal friends and others who are aware of the

gift have questioned me as to why this has not been

done as in their opinion we have done more for the

University than any other person including those for

whom buildings have been named on the Campus.



I am being very frank with you about this situation

as I feel aggrieved by the situation and I believe

you will act in a manner you believe right.



With very best wishes, I am



Sincerely,



/s/ E. M. Wilbourn

Estelle M. Wilbourn



Motion by Mr. Grant, seconded by Mr. Davis, carried

without dissenting vote that further discussion on

this matter be deferred until a later meeting and

those persons present at the time referred to in Mrs.

Wilbourn's letter who are still in the Reno area (i.

e., Dr. Lombardi, Mr. Hardy, Mr. Ross and Miss Terry)

be contacted.



(3) Request for Sewer Easement through Stadium Parking

Lot - Mr. Milton Sharp, Engineer for Truckee Meadows

Engineers, Inc., came into the meeting on behalf of

the City of Reno. He presented the following letter

to the Committee:



June 10, 1965



642 N. Sierra Street

FAirview 2-3872



Board of Regents

University of Nevada

Reno, Nevada



Dear Sir:



This firm is currently retained as consulting engi-

neers by the City of Reno for planning and design of

sanitary sewers in North Reno. Two of the sewers

under considertion are planned to cross through the

University of Nevada. An aerial photo map with the

location of the proposed sewers shown as superim-

posed red lines is being forwarded with this letter.



We hereby request, on behalf of the City of Reno,

that easements providing for construction and main-

tenance of the proposed sewers be granted. We fur-

ther request permission for access to University

property by contractors for the purpose of construct-

ing the proposed sewers.



The proposed sewer adjacent to Manzanita Lake is re-

quired for relief of an overloaded sewer west of

Virginia Street, to provide sewer capacity for your

Dormitory construction and to provide capacity for

future urban growth of the City. The sewer extend-

ing through the old Stadium and along the east side

of the Campus is urgently needed by the City to sup-

port urban growth to the north and to relieve badly

overloaded sewers west of Virginia Street.



We will provide, in construction contracts, for the

restoration of all landscaping, paving or other facil-

ities that might be disturbed during construction.

The contractor's operations can be restricted, within

reasonable limits, to areas which you or the Univer-

sity Engineer may designate.



We will submit plans and specifications to the Univer-

sity Engineer for his comments prior to bidding and

will provide legal descriptions of the required ease-

ments.



It is the intention of the City of Reno to complete

construction of these sewers within the immediate

future. We intend to have construction of that

portion of the line through the new parking lot com-

pleted prior to start of your paving construction.

In order to accomplish this and because of the ur-

gency of the City's need for added sewer capacity

for the rapidly urbanizing area north of the Campus,

we hope that you will be able to act on this request

at your meeting of June 10, 1965.



Yours truly,



Truckee Meadows Engineers, Inc.



/s/ Milton L. Sharp

Registered Engineer



Motion by Mr. Grant, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried

without dissenting vote that the easement be granted

as requested and the access to University property

during construction be permitted subject to further

University staff review.



(4) Presentation of Plans for Stadium Parking Lot - Mr.

Webb Brown came into the meeting to present the plans

for the Stadium Parking Lot. The improvements have

been designed although no funds are available until

after July 1, 1965. The University Engineer's Office

recommends that the project be bid at the earliest

possible date to insure being completed during the

warm weather. The project is to consist of paving a

portion (if not all) of the large parking area south

of the Stadium and north of the developed Campus.



Mr. Brown presented plans showing the proposed devel-

opment of the Parking Lot, including paving, conduits

for lights and landscaping.



Motion by Mr. Grant, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried

out dissenting vote that the plans be approved as

outlined, including paving, landscapding and conduits

for lighting, with some investigation made of the

possibility of renting lights through Sierra Pacific

Power Company (see item 6 below).



The Committee adjourned at 10:15 A.M. to tour Stead Air

Force Base.



The Plant and Property Committee meeting reconvened at

12:45 P.M. after its tour of Stead Air Force Base.



(5) Discussion resumed at this point with Dr. Broten and

Mr. Webster Brown again present to discuss the sur-

facing material for the new athletic track. Mr. Brown

discussed the alternative materials for surfacing of

such areas. They are: the "old specification" rub-

ber asphalt material which requires heating to a very

high temperature; the "new specification" or low tem-

perature rubber asphalt; and the "grass tex". Mr.

Brown pointed out that only one University and three

high schools are known to be using a track with the

"new specification" rubber asphalt material and the

contractor will not presently provide more than a

performance bond. Dr. Broten spoke of the Athletic

Department's (and specifically of Mr. Dankworth's as

Track Coach) belief that the new rubber asphalt sur-

face might prove to have great potential, possibly

being more desirable than the grass tex. He agreed

however that proceeding with this type of surfacing

material in the absence of a warranty from the con-

tractor and lacking any replies to inquiries made of

the schools now using the surfacing might very well

prove disastrous. Dr. Broten agreed to contact the

schools now having the low termperature rubber as-

phalt track and report the results to the Committee

at its meeting on June 14.



Motion by Mr. Davis, seconded by Mr. Grant, carried

without dissenting vote that the Plant and Property

Committee be authorized to act for the Board in the

final decision concerning the surfacing material to

be used for the athletic track.



(6) Stadium Parking Lot - Mr. Brown and Mr. Hancock re-

ported on conversations held with Sierra Pacific Power

Company representatives during the meeting recess con-

cerning their rental arrangements of outdoor lighting.

Mr. Brown explained the various arrangements and the

schedule of rates available.



Motion by Mr. Hug, seconded by Mr. Davis, carried

unanimously that the Committee recommend to the Board

that the completion of the Stadium Parking Lot be

accomplished in the following order as funds permit:



a. Water lines installed in first are (that area

closest to the developed Campus and described

as accommodating 640 cars).



b. Paving and striping completed in same area.



c. Landscaping completed in same area.



d. Water lines installed in balance of area.



e. Paving and striping and installation of planting

pockets in balance of area.



f. Landscaping of balance of area.



g. Lighting of entire area as required.



(7) Nye Hall, Reno Campus - Construction bids on this

project were opened by the State Planning Board May

26. The construction budget is $1,956,600. Base

bids ran from a low of $2,127,000 to a high of

$2,516,929. 12 deductive alternatives were included

in the proposal. These alternatives are listed below

in the order in which the Housing and Home Finance

Agency approved. Deductions must be made in the order

listed, except that items C and F cannot both be de-

ducted. The amounts shown are those included in the

lowest base bid of Dixon-Tiberti Construction Co.



Base Bid Total $2,127,000



Alternates



A Delete Berylix additive -9,200 2,117,800

B Delete plastic coating at

eyebrows and balconies -8,000 2,109,800

C Delete carpeting, substitute

tile (see #8) -62,700 2,109,800

D Substitute 8" block for 4" -22,600 2,087,200

E Delete landscaping -17,000 2,070,200

F Delete carpeting -79,000 1,991,200

G Delete some interior painting -40,000 1,951,200

I Delete intercommunicants

system -23,000 1,928,200



Contract issued for $1,928,200



It is recommended that the Plant and Property Commit-

tee:



1. Recommend the acceptance of the Dixon-Tiberti bid

with deductive alternates subtracted from the base

bid as detailed above, and



2. That carpeting be separately bid, to be paid for

by use of any contingency funds remaining in the

project plus other funds made available by the

Board of Regents; and



3. That the Board pledge up to $79,000 (Dixon-Tiberti

bid) for carpet to come from Board of Regents

Special Projects Fund and to be repaid by assess-

ment of a surcharge of $10 per semester and $8

per Summer School session for Nye Hall residents;

and



4. That a separate contract be let for the intercom-

munications system with funding to come from con-

tingency funds as a substantial savings is be-

lieved possible.



Motion by Mr. Grant, seconded by Mr. Davis, carried

unanimously that the recommendations contained above

be approved by the Committee and in turn recommended

to the Board for approval.



(8) Oddie Boulevard Extension - The University Engineer's

Office reports that the State Highway Department is

currently designing the extension of Oddie Boulevard.

Under consideration is a proposed street located 500

feet west of the Western Pacific Railroad tracks

which would connect Evans Avenue to Oddie Boulevard.

The University Engineer recommends that the State

Highway Department be requested to delete this pro-

posed tie of Evans Avenue extended to Oddie Boulevard.



Motion by Mr. Davis, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried

without dissenting vote that the Committee approve

the recommendation of the University Engineer and so

recommend to the Board.



(9) Reports Concerning Appearance of University Repre-

sentatives on Zoning Matters



Mr. Hug reported verbally on his attendance at the

Regional Planning Commission on June 1 and Mr. Pine

and Mr. Humphrey reported on their meeting with the

Reno City Council on May 24.



(10) Zoning of Evans Avenue East of Reno Campus - Presi-

dent Armstrong presented the following letter from

Mr. Humphrey:



"On May 17 the Plant and Property Committee, with a

majority of the Board of Regents present, voted to

oppose a change in zoning from R-1 to R-3 for an area

east of the Campus, west of the railroad tracks and

north of the Orr Ditch. A letter of opposition was

presented to the Regional Planning Commission on

May 18.



"The applicant is Mrs. Eleanor Madsen of 1110 Evans

Avenue who wishes to sell her house to the Phi Sigma

Kappa Fraternity. The neighbors on Evans Avenue were

unanimously opposed to the zoning change. The Re-

gional Planning Commission denied the zoning change

and Mr. Madsen has appealed to the Reno City Council.

The appeal will be heard June 28, 1965.



"After the May 18 meeting (about May 20) a delegation

from Phi Sigma Kappa called on Dean of Men Hathhorn

to protest the University action. He contacted me

and I asked him to tell the Fraternity representatives

that the next meeting of the Plant and Property Com-

mittee was June 10 and that a letter of appeal could

be directed to the Committee or, with advance notice,

representatives could appear. On June 9 I received

a letter from Miss Marcia Flanders, the real estate

broker involved in the proposed sale.



"Unless I am instructed to the contrary a letter of

protest will be written to the Reno City Council on

this proposed zoning change."



President Armstrong recommended that the University

maintain its previously stated position of opposition

to this proposed rezoning.



Motion by Mr. Grant, seconded by Mr. Davis, carried

without dissenting vote that the University reaffirm

its previous stand on this matter and oppose the re-

zoning from R-1 to R-3 of the referenced property.



(11) Anine Bloch Christensen Endowment - President Arm-

strong reviewed for the Committee the terms of an

endowment received by the University and presented

the following letter from Mr. Humphrey:



"The court order authorizing distribution of the

(Anine Bloch Christensen) bequest states that money

can be spent out of the cash residue to 'provide for

a plaque in the Student Union building in memory of

Nels Bloch Christensen and Anine Bloch Christensen

and commemorating the gift and bequest for education-

al purposes'.



"We have held $200 from the final cash distribution

to pay for a plaque. I suggest that a plaque be

purchased and placed in the Student Union building

and that a photograph be arranged with Mrs. Scales,

Mr. Jepson and Mr. Gray participating in 'dedicating'

the plaque. If satisfactory, perhaps the plaque

could read:



In Memory of

Nels Bloch Christensen

and

Anine Bloch Christensen

Residents of Reno

Whose generosity has benefited the

students of the University of Nevada

1965



Motion by Mr. Davis, seconded by Mr. Grant, carried

unanimously that the plaque as described above be

purchased and placed as recommended by Mr. Humphrey.



(12) Zoning Change on Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas - An

inquiry concerning this zoning change (from R-1 to

C-1) on Maryland Parkway 150 feet south of the NSU

Campus 850 feet north of Tropicana Boulevard and

directly east of property reserved for a Boy Scouts

of America district office) was made by Mr. Ronzone

in a letter dated May 13 and discussed at the meet-

ing of the Committee on May 17. Subsequent to that

time Mr. Humphrey reports that ... "Mr. Ronzone

checked May 18 and learned that the zoning change

had been approved by the Clark County Planning Com-

mission April 13 and by the Board of County Commis-

sioners May 6. I checked with Robbins Cahill, Clark

County Manager, on May 19 and learned that once the

zoning change is approved it cannot be reversed un-

less at the end of one year the proposed shopping

center has not been constructed. Mr. Ronzone said

that he believed the shopping center was speculative

and perhaps would not be built."



(13) Mr. Rogers reported on an applciation requesting the

Clark County Planning Commission's consideration of a

variance on property located immediately south of the

Nevada Southern University Campus. This variance has

been requested to allow the construction of a theater

and a parking lot. Because the hearing on this appli-

cation was scheduled for June 8, a postponement was

requested, and granted, to afford the Board an op-

portunity to consider the problems which may be cre-

ated if the variance were granted.



Motion by Mr. Grant, seconded by Mr. Davis, carried

without dissenting vote that the Committee recommend

to the Board that the application for variance on the

property described above be opposed.



The meeting adjourned at 2:10 P.M.



Action by the Board:



Item #1 Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Ronzone,

carried without dissenting vote that the action of

the Committee become the action of the Board.



Item #2 Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Hug,

carried with Mr. Davis opposed, that ALL those

persons referred to as being present be contacted.



Item #3 Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mrs. Magee,

carried unanimously that the action of the Com-

mittee become the action of the Board.



Item #4 See item 6 below.



Item #5 Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Davis,

carried unanimously that the Plant and Property

Committee be authorized to act for the Board in

this matter.



Item #6 Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Davis,

carried unanimously that the action of the Com-

mittee become the action of the Board.



Item #7 Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Hug, car-

ried unanimously by roll call vote that the recom-

mendations of the Committee as listed be approved

by the Board.



Dr. Lombardi entered the meeting at this point.



Item #8 Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Davis,

carried unanimously that the action of the Com-

mittee become the action of the Board.



Item #9 No action by the Board.



Item #10 Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Dr. White,

carried unanimously that the action of the Com-

mittee become the action of the Board.



Item #11 Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Davis,

carried unanimously that the action of the Com-

mittee become the action of the Board.



Item #12 Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Grant,

carried without dissenting vote that zoning in

Southern Nevada be discussed at the next meeting

of the Plant and Property Committee.



Item #13 Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr.Davis,

carried without dissenting vote that the action

of the Committee become the action of the Board.



Concerning item #1, Dr. Lombardi reported on correspondence

with Dr. Stout and Dr. Wood concerning Wilbourn land trans-

action and stated that their responses indicate no recol-

lection of any commitment or offer to name a building at

Nevada Southern for the Wilbourn family.



Mr. Rogers and Mr. Pine left the meeting.



Motion by Mr. Grant, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen, carried

unanimously that a suitable resolution be drafted by the

Administration expressing the Regents' appreciation to

Mr. Rogers for his many years of service to the University.



6. Report of the Educational Policies Committee Meeting of

June 10, 1965



Dr. White presented the minutes of the meeting as follows:



The Educational Policies Committee met in the Travis Lounge

of the Student Union on Thursday, June 10, 1965. Present:

Regents Anderson, Davis, Grant, Magee and White; President

Armstrong, Vice President Humphrey. Professor Mordy and

Dr. Jack Shirley were present for portions of the meeting.



The meeting was called to order by Chairman White at 2:20

P.M.



1. Report of the National Advisory Board to Desert Research

Institute



The following report from the National Advisory Board

to Desert Research Institute, prepared following its

meeting on May 19 and 20, 1965 on the University of

Nevada Campus, was presented to the Committee:



COMMENTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS



The general findings and recommendations of the Advisory

Board are addressed to the University as well as the

Desert Research Institute, as the two have become in-

extricably combined into one whole.



The Desert Research Institute is the instrument through

which an appropriate, important and fruitful research

program at the University of Nevada is being success-

fully brought into being. The program is important to

the State and the Nation, but it is equally important

to the teaching function of the University. Without

research, teaching becomes outmoded and uninspired.

Research strengthens teaching. Research provides funds

which support outstanding faculty members who want to

and should teach both graduate and undergraduate cours-

es.



Thus, the professional staff of the Desert Research

Institute should, as far as it is practical, have full

faculty status and teach some courses. To the greatest

possible degree, faculty members should participate in

the Desert Research Institute areas of research work.



The document "The Program and Plans of the Desert Re-

search Institute" presents a philosophy and program

with which the Board heartily concurs, and which the

Board strongly endorses. This pioneering program is

uniquely appropriate to the University and the State

of Nevada, and has great national and international

significance for all arid areas. The Desert Research

Institute is emphasizing the fields of Atmospheric

Physics, Hydrology, Desert Biology and Western North

American Studies in the Behavioral Sciences. This

program is sharp enough to lead to a coherent, mean-

ingful and appropriate program of research, and yet

broad enough to allow the exploitation of new oppor-

tunities and discoveries. It avoids going into various

fashionable and extraneous fields. Edited and sharpen-

ed in detail, and either shortened or provided with an

adequate summary, the document could be invaluable in

soliciting private or Government funds.



Moreover, the document is not empty. The Desert Re-

search Institute has made substantial and steady prog-

ress in bringing able men to the University, and in

organizing and pursuing a coherent program of interre-

lated research. The Fleischmann Foundation grant has

been well spent, and it has created something of great

value to Nevada.



While a substantial start has been made, further prog-

ress depends on more money and more outstanding men.

If the Desert Research Institute and the University are

to succeed, sufficient funds must be made available.

these should be sought from individuals, from founda-

tions, and from the Government. Adequate and appro-

priate support to the University from the State of

Nevada is essential for the stability of the program,

and necessary if other money is to be obtained. In

seeking Government support, every effort should be

made to get program and institutional grants which

will afford the flexibility necessary to create the

coherent, productive and meaningful program that the

Desert Research Institute has outlined. Project grants

should of course not be neglected, but some broader

sort of funding, such as that which has been so effec-

tively provided by the Fleischmann Foundation, is nec-

essary for a successful program.



The first and most urgent need of the Desert Research

Institute and the University is more very good people.

These should include both established leaders in re-

search such as Dr. Went, and productive and energetic

young men. The Board urges that the latter be sought,

for example, in Australia, the Scandinavian countries

and Holland as well as in the United States. Qualifi-

cations should not be set too narrowly. The program

outlined is broad enough to accommodate a variety of

talent, and the program cannot all be carried through

at once, so the timing of various parts can be accom-

modated to the availability of talent.



The Desert Research Institute and the University have

great advantages -- excellent climate and geography,

close proximity to the scientific and cultural re-

sources of the Bay Area, and above all, the opportunity

to participate in and advance an attractive and impor-

tant program of research. But other things are needed:

one is adequate salaries; another is a source of funds

which makes it possible to act quickly in offering a

good man a suitable appointment; another is a reasonable

teaching load for those who do teach; another thing is

suitable resources of a number of sorts, including com-

munication. The Campus is an appreciable distance from

the nearest other institutions and far from many with

closely related work. Ample funds must be available

for consultation and communication with colleagues in

other institutions.



The Board feels forced to consider research in relation

to the northern and southern Campuses. The Desert

Research Institute has important legal and operational

responsibilities for serving and stimulating research

on both Campuses. It is very important however, that

the interdisciplinary activities which are being so

successfully established at Reno should not be diluted

or fragmented.



The Board strongly urges that plans provide for more

research on the southern Campus, and for the masters

degree there, but for the present concentrate doctoral

work at the northern Campus. In this country, most

doctoral candidates do their work away from their home

city, and concentrating doctoral work on the northern

Campus cannot be reasonably held to impose a hardship.



The research activities on the two Campuses should

supplement and strengthen one another -- they should

not be completely unrelated. On the other hand, it

would be dangerous to split one project which requires

unity of work and direction between the two Campuses

and seek to administer it from one or the other. A

research project or program on either Campus should

have enough independence to proceed without continual

help from the other Campuses.



The Board is gratified by studies toward improving

mathematics. It is also important to relate mathe-

matics to other research activities. An attractive

action toward this end would be the addition of more

than one able, broad-gauged man to the Computer Center,

preferably with joint appointments in mathematics or

in electrical engineering. These men should not be

merely specialized programmers. They should be stat-

isticians or good applied mathematicians.



John R. Pierce, Chairman

Fred Eggan

Victor La Mer

Vincent Schaefer

Per Scholander

Lloyd Smith (absent)

Samuel Goudsmit



It was the consensus of the Committee that the report

was extremely favorable and reflected great credit upon

the University and Desert Research Institute. Profes-

sor Mordy briefly commented on the qualifications of

the members of the Advisory Board, pointing out that

they are probably among the elite of the scientific

world. It was suggested that the contents of the report

of the Advisory Board be made available to the Press so

that the people throughout the State might become better

acquainted with the activities and potential of the

Desert Research Institute.



Motion by Mr. Magee, seconded by Mr. Davis, carried

unanimously that the Committee receive the report of

the National Advisory Board and recommend its approval

by the Board, and that every effort be made to en-

courage dissemination of the contents of the report

to the general public.



2. Proposed Restriction of Enrollment at Nevada Southern,

Fall of 1965



The following proposal, prepared by the Academic Commit-

tee for Nevada Southern and transmitted by Dean Carlson,

is to ... "limit the number of entering Freshman stu-

dents for the Fall semester 1965-66 to approximately

500. Those who meet the requirements for regular

Freshmen standing will be admitted. Action on students

who would be admissible as unclassified students would

be deferred until August 15, which is the close of ad-

missions for the Fall semester. Unclassified students

who attend the 1965 Summer Session and earn a C or

better average for a minimum of 6 credits would be

admitted, plus any additional unclassified applicants

to bring the total up to the 500 level."



Proposal for Restriction of Entering Freshmen,

Nevada Southern Campus, Fall of 1965



"We believe that staff provided by the 1965-66 budget

will permit us to handle only about 500 Freshman stu-

dents next semester. That is to say, there will be

insufficient sections in certain areas, particular in

the Humanities, Science and Social Science, if more

than approximately 500 Freshmen and unclassified stu-

dents are admitted. Not every student will be able to

take the normal program called for by the curriculum

he has chosen to follow. Of course, the more over the

500 who are admitted, the more students whose programs

will be unsatisfactory. Registration will allocate

spaces in these classes with insufficient sections by

chance so that the hopeful Zoology major with high

potential, for example, may be excluded from his basic

Zoology course by a student whose high school record

and test scores indicate far less prospect of success

in the class.



"We anticipate that we may have as many as 600 who will

wish to enter this Freshman class. About 400 will be

students who meet fully the requirements which are

outlined on pages 25 and 26 of the Catalog of General

Information.



"Another 200 will fall below that standard but be ad-

missible as unclassified students. If these predic-

tions are reasonably accurate, our problem is clear --

about 100 too many Freshmen. Note that transfers and

graduate specials are not problems since the classes

we expect to be in short supply are, in the main, cours-

es taken by, and some of which are required of, Fresh-

men.



"We therefore recommend consideration of the following

temporary plan to meet this emergency:



"1. All students who meet admission requirements for

regular status will be admitted.



"2. Unclassified applicants will be admitted who have

attended the 1965 summer Session and earned a C

or better average for a minimum of 6 credits, and

preferably in courses that will be in the greatest

demand in the Fall.



"3. Additional unclassified applicants may be admitted

on August 15 selected on the basis of high school

grades and/or ACT scores. The number to be so

admitted will be governed by the difference between

the number expected to attend (on the basis of #1

and #2 described above) and the 500 leavel. If

possible, such admission of the best unclassified

students will be attempted at an earlier date.



"4. Admission of other applicants who would be admis-

sable as unclassified students would be deferred

for consideration for entrance at the Spring

semester when enrollment may be expected to de-

crease slightly. They should be encouraged to

remove their deficiencies by registering as spe-

cial students for available classes, correspondence

or available extension courses.



"5. Rigidly enforce the deadline of August 15 for

application for admission by students entering

College for the first time. Otherwise, the de-

cision referred to in paragraph 3 would be unduly

prolonged and work a hardship on the applicants.



"6. Every effort should be made to inform every poten-

tial student of this decision as quickly as it is

made.



"We recognize the lateness of the hour at which this is

proposed. It must be understood that it was not pos-

sible to know the extent of the problem until we had

a clear picture of the result of the budget cuts on our

staff.



"We believe that the suggested measures will enable us

to provide the best potential with the most we can

offer. We feel that our educational program will pro-

duce the maximum result through the selection process

we propose."



The proposal was reviewed, at President Armstrong's re-

quest, by Mr. Humphrey, Dr. Shirley, Dr. Palola and

the following recommendation submitted:



"If the enrollment limitation suggested by Dean Carlson

for Freshman and unclassified students is necessary, the

recommendation for accomplishing this seems satisfacto-

ry. However, the proposed enrollment restriction does

not seem justified in view of the following.



"According to the space utilization study, general

classroom space does exist on the Nevada Southern Cam-

pus. Although the number of sections being taught as

compared to the number of room periods available is at

the 90th percentile nationally, the number of students

per section is at the 10th percentile nationally. This

suggests that additional students could be accommodated

in the existing classrooms. Also, space provided by

the new Social Science building was not included in the

recent space utilization study.



"Even though more room is available in the general

classrooms, critical space limitations exist for teach-

ing laboratories. This is especially true for the

Science-Technology building. These laboratories are

operating at 98% of capacity when in use. This average

hours used per week is 14 which implies that the space

limitation in teaching laboratories could be resolved,

in part, by scheduling more sections per week. (Skid-

more, Owings and Merrill space standards specify 20

hours per week at 80% capacity for teaching laborato-

ries.)



"One of the main reasons given by Dean Carlson for

restricting the unclassified group was that it would

keep that group from taking up classroom space needed

by the regular Freshmen. In reviewing the 1965 Fall

Semester Class Schedule, for Las Vegas, it is noted

that the students will register in the following order:

Graduates, Juniors, Sophomores and Freshmen from 8:00

A.M. to 2:30 P.M. with the Unclassified, Specials and

Auditors from 3:00 to 7:30 P.M. This order of regis-

tration provides for the Freshman, Sophomore, Junior,

Senior, and Graduate classifications to register

BEFORE the Unclassified and Special groups, thereby

giving them first choice of existing classes. The fact

that these groups may find numerous sections closed

would not keep them from enrolling in those classes

which were available. It should not be too difficult

to absorb another 100 students in the total curriculum

as the maximum registration load for these two partic-

ular groups is less than those for the regular Freshman

student; i. e., unclassified -- 12 to 13 credits; spe-

cials -- 6 credits.



"On the basis of the above information it is recommend-

ed that no enrollment limitation be established on the

Nevada Southern Campus. Further, since the University

has no general policy limiting class size, it is sug-

gested that arbitrary class size limits should not be

set without the approval of the Chancellor at the

Nevada Southern Campus."



Motion by Mr. Davis, seconded by Mrs. Magee, carried

without dissenting vote that the Committee recommend

to the Board that Freshman enrollment at Nevada Southern

for the Fall of 1965 NOT be restricted.



3. Study of Limitation of Enrollments of Out-of-State

Students for Reno Campus, Fall of 1965



The following report, recently prepared by Dr. Palola,

was presented to the Committee as part of the study of

the possibility of limiting enrollments of out-of-state

students for the Reno Campus.



"The data in the accompanying table show the percentage

of admissions who actually registered for the 3 pre-

ceding Fall semesters, by residence and by Campus.

These data were obtained from the Summary of Admissions

prepared in the Admissions and Registrar's Office.



"From these data it can be concluded that:



"1. For the Reno Campus, approximately 80% of the

resident admissions register, as compared to 64%

of the non-resident admissions who register;



"2. For the Nevada Southern Campus, approximately 88%

of the resident admissions register as compared to

73% of the non-resident admissions who register;



"3. Therefore, the rate of registration for the Nevada

Southern Campus is somewhat higher for both resi-

dent and non-resident admissions than for the Reno

Campus.



"Since the registration rates are fairly constant over

the 3 years examined, we would be safe in assuming that

approximately the same rates will occur for subsequent

registrations. Data for the 1965 Fall semester have

not been reported because the figures are too small and

not significant at this point.



"The current procedure of providing monthly admissions

reports will give the necessary date to indicate the

trend in the number of new admissions who actually

register. Should it be necessary to restrict enroll-

ment at any given time, a special admissions report

could be run and the percentage applied."



There was much general discussion by the Committee con-

cerning this matter. It was the consensus that should

the percentage of out-of-state enrollment ever exceed

that which is considered desirable, thought must be

given to imposing some limitation on the number of out-

of-state students admitted. However, it was agreed

that much study by the staff would be required as to

the best methods for limiting such enrollment.



Motion by Mr. Magee, seconded by Mr. Davis, carried

without dissenting vote that discussion be deferred

until further study has been made.



Regent Davis suggested that a study of the methods

available for limiting enrollment of out-of-state

students be initiated as soon as possible with the

intent of having material available for the Board in

the early Fall.



4. Dr. Anderson reported to the Committee an item of pend-

ing legislation (SB 597) which, if enacted, would pro-

vide to groups like the Washoe Medical Center, St.

Mary's Hospital, University of Nevada, and perhaps

others, matching funds to establish a Regional Medical

Library. Dr. Anderson asked the Committee to recom-

mend that the Board approve in principle an application

for such matching funds in cooperation with suitable

groups should this proposed legislation become effec-

tive.



Motion by Mr. Davis, seconded by Mr. Magee, carried

unanimously that such a recommendation be made to the

Board.



The meeting adjourned at 3:55 P.M.



ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATIONS, REGULAR UNDERGRADUATE AND

GRADUATE STUDENTS, RENO CAMPUS, NEVADA SOUTHERN CAMPUS,

COMBINED CAMPUSES

FALL SEMESTERS, 1963, 1963, 1964



1962

Resident Non-Resident Total

Reno Campus



New Admissions 1110 415 1525

New Admissions Who

Registered 894 253 1147

Percentage 80.6 61.0 75.2



Nevada Southern Campus



New Admissions 370 46 416

New Admissions Who

Registered 344 38 382

Percentage 93.0 82.6 91.8



Combined Campuses



New Admissions 1480 461 1941

New Admissions Who

Registered 1238 291 1529

Percentage 83.6 63.1 78.8





1963

Resident Non-Resident Total

Reno Campus



New Admissions 1146 441 1577

New Admissions Who

Registered 886 274 1160

Percentage 77.3 63.5 73.6



Nevada Southern Campus



New Admissions 546 35 581

New Admissions Who

Registered 466 23 489

Percentage 85.3 65.7 84.2



Combined Campuses



New Admissions 1692 466 2158

New Admissions Who

Registered 1352 297 1649

Percentage 79.9 63.7 85.4





1964

Resident Non-Resident Total

Reno Campus



New Admissions 1265 465 1730

New Admissions Who

Registered 1064 310 1374

Percentage 84.1 66.7 79.4



Nevada Southern Campus



New Admissions 818 28 846

New Admissions Who

Registered 714 20 734

Percentage 87.3 71.4 86.8



Combined Campuses



New Admissions 2083 493 2576

New Admissions Who

Registered 1778 330 2108

Percentage 85.4 66.9 81.8



Action of the Board:



Item #1 Motion by Mrs. Magee, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried

unanimously that the report of the National Adviso-

ry Board to the Desert Research Institute be ac-

cepted.



Upon motion by Dr. Anderson, seconded by Dr.

Lombardi, it was unanimously voted that the follow-

ing statement be released to the Press:



"The importance of the meeting of the National

Advisory Board of the Desert Research Institute

is not confined to Reno but extends to both Cam-

puses of the University. The primary role of the

University is both the advancement and teaching

of knowledge. Thus teaching and research are

completely intertwined. Research results not

passed along to students lose much of their value.

Teaching without research is certain to be anti-

quated and outmoded.



"For these reasons, the Board of Regents attach

great importance to the conclusions of the dis-

tinguished men on the National Advisory Board.

Their recommendations will be given continuing

consideration by the Regents and President Arm-

strong as a part of our effort to build up the

effectiveness and stature of our University.

Obviously, we cannot compete with many other

schools in quantity, but there is no reason for

believing that the quality of our University

cannot complete with the best in the country."



The Regents discussed problems confronting the University

in its search for financial support of its programs. Pres-

ident Armstrong spoke briefly on the long range financial

development plans now being formulated by the Administration

and indicated that he expected to have a proposal ready for

discussion by the Regents at a meeting of the Development

Committee on July 23.



The following statement from Dr. Anderson, as Chairman of

the Board of Regents, was presented as a means of charging

the members of the Board with the responsibility of "meet-

ing existing and future challenges".



"As we settle on our budget for the next two years,

none of us can deny a feeling of frustration because

the last Legislature did not more fully support our

proposed programs, not only in the area of general

teaching support but also in the matter of inadequate

funding for capital construction, and I may add that a

particular example of this is the failure to provide

even the first increment of our Physics and Chemistry

building, a top priority item for both of the past

two Legislatures.



"We are not asking for champagne, we are asking for a

full and needed loaf of bread and we get a load with a

considerable proportion of vitally needed programs

sliced off.



"We cannot be wholly critical of the Legislature for

the sum to be divided was only of a certain size and

had to be divided many ways, and, within the limits

of the money available we were given a fair share.



"But it is not enough; no support of an extension

program, too little support of a vocational techno-

logical program, almost no support for research, not

enough for new and needed staff and equipment.



"And this has been the nearly consistent pattern for

many years past. I think the members of the last

Legislature have seen more clearly than any before

them, that we cannot maintain status quo in major

sources of tax revenues, in the 1% permissible base

for bonded indebtedness in sales tax and other ways

and still meet the responsibilities posed by the chal-

lenges of our rapidly increasing population. But it

will take time for the Legislators and the other people

of Nevada to meet these challenges through legislative

or referendum accomplishment, 2-3 or 4 years or more

even if there is a real effort.



"If we are to meet existing and future challenges in

time we cannot wait several years, we in the University,

the Board of Regents, the Administration, the Deans, the

faculty, the alumni, the students, and all interested

citizens of Nevada, are going to have to take much more

rapid steps.



"In the past our institutions have received their finan-

cial nourishment chiefly through two main sources, the

Legislative appropriations and the generous donations

of the Fleischmann Foundation. While we hope that both

of these will continue I think it high time and appro-

priate that we seek very substantial nourishment from

many other sources. Other Foundations, Government

sources, wealthy private persons or firms, our Alumni,

and all of our Nevadans, Alumni or not, rich or not,

that we can muster to our cause.



"We have never had a sustained program by all those

named above to accomplish a drive for excellence in our

Universities.



"That is what I would like to challenge you Board of

Regent members with, and beyond you all Nevadans.



"With a Chancellor now in each University, with our

President in better position to spearhead such a

drive, with our Director of Development, with our

Alumni and friends already having developed a good

spark of organization and drive in last years cam-

paign for Library Funds, with all of you Regents

vitally interested in increasing accomplishment, I

believe that now is the time to go forward by our own

expanded efforts.



"The improved strength of the undergraduate program is

paramount but we have already demonstrated, as have many

other Universities, that the incrasing strength of the

graduate and research programs has had a remarkably

beneficial effect on the undergraduate program as well.

Distinguished professors, attracted by the prospect of

working in the more advanced graduate and research pro-

grams or by the available research facilities, will also

lend their brilliance to the undergraduate classroom,

our first line of responsibility.



"The areas for improvement are as wide as the University

itself.



Salary Supplementation

Faculty Research Grants

More Teaching Fellowships and Expanded Postgraduate

Program

Visiting Professorships and Increasing Number of

Endowed or Supported Distinguished Professor-

ships

The Libraries

The General University Extension Service to date

an orphan, with very little legislative support

Diploma Completion Programs, inadequately funded

Expanded Research Facilities and I refer you to the

just presented comments and recommendations of

the National Advisory Board on the Desert Re-

search Institute



"And last and just as important as any other items are

additional facilities and equipment in which to accom-

plish all these and to institute new programs to meet

the demanding and changing needs of the world of today.



"Many of these matters have been previous discussed with

some of you Board members and members of the Administra-

tion.



"As your Chairman I would like to challenge you with

attempting this Drive for Excellence and see whether

you agree with me and what you can come up with in the

way of ideas and accomplishments. It's up to you to

pick up the challenge or take the easy way out. Crit-

icism, comments and discussion are requested."



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Ronzone, carried

unanimously that the foregoing statement of the Chairman

of the Board of Regents be made a part of the minutes.



Item #2 Motion by Mr. Grant, seconded by Mr. Ronzone, car-

ried unanimously that the recommendation of the

Committee be approved by the Board.



Dr. White stated that she wished to be quoted as

believing that "the foregoing recommendation by

the Academic Committee for Nevada Southern Uni-

versity was prompted by concern over staff load

rather than space requirements."



Item #3 No action by the Board.



Item #4 Motion by Mrs. White, seconded by Mrs. Magee,

carried unanimously that the recommendation of

the Committee be approved by the Board.



7. Personnel Recommendations



Personnel recommendations were presented by President

Armstrong as follows:



Leaves of Absence



Dr. Joseph H. Robertson, College of Agriculture, for one

year without pay, beginning July 1, 1965, for the purpose

of becoming Chief of Party at Egerton College, Njora, Kenya.

Dr. Robertson plans to apply for sabbatical leave beginning

July 1, 1966 as a continuance activity at Egerton College.



Glen H. Clark, College of Engineering, for two years with-

out pay, beginning July 1, 1965, to work toward a Ph. D.

degree at the University of Michigan.



Mrs. Constance J. Clark, Library, for two years without pay,

beginning July 1, 1965, to accompany her husband who will be

working toward a Ph. D. degree at University of Michigan.



Dr. Andre Simmons, Nevada Southern University, Business Ad-

ministration, for two years without pay, beginning July 1,

1965, to take the position of Economic Affairs Officer with

the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa.



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mrs. Magee, carried

unanimously that the above recommendations be approved.



ADMINISTRATION



Robert Duane Jeffers, Non-Academic Personnel Officer, R-III,

Office of the Vice President-Finance, for the period July 1,

1965 to June 30, 1966, at annual salary of $11,113 (change

in status -- from classified to professional).



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE



K. Colin Betts, Graduate Assistant in Agricultural Bio-

chemistry and Soil Science for the period June 1, 1965 to

June 30, 1966 at an annual salary rate of $3450.



Diana Marie Frugoli, Graduate Assistant in Agricultural

Biochemistry and Soil Science for the period July 1, 1965

to June 30, 1966 - $4875



Barbara Goding, Graduate Assistant in Home Economics for

the academic year 1965-66 - $2300



Stephen Paul Hammack, Lecturer in Animal Science, for the

period July 1, 1965 to June 30, 1966 - $5175



Charles Rankin Heisler, Associate Professor and Associate

Biochemist, Agricultural Biochemistry and Soil Science for

the period July 1, 1965 to June 30, 1966 - $11,113



Leo Price Herndon, Associate Professor of Agricultural

Education for the period July 1, 1965 to June 30, 1966 -

$11,113



Lawrence Milton Kirk, Radio-Television Specialist for the

period June 15, 1965 to June 30, 1966 at an annual salary

rate of $8618.



Barbara Jean Margerum, Instructor in Home Economics, for

the academic year 1965-66 - $6291



George A. Myles, Lecturer in Research Economics, for the

period June 1, 1965 to June 30, 1966 at an annual salary

rate of $11,470.



Raymond G. Rose, Graduate Assistant, Plant Science Division,

for the period of July 1, 1965 to June 30, 1966 - $4485



Richard N. Trelease, Lecturer in Plant Science, for the

period July 1 to September 1, 1965 - $920



Vincent H. Wavra, Agricultural Technical, for the period

June 7 through August 31, 1965 - $1301.60



Trumen W. Whorton, 4-H Club Camp Director, for the period

June 12 through September 11, 1965 - $1350



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCE



H. Joseph Angell, Graduate Assistant in English, for the

academic year 1965-66 - $2500



Robert Manfred Arvidson, Graduate Assistant in Psychology,

for the academic year 1965-66 - $2700



Arturo Biblarz, Assistant Professor of Sociology for the

academic year 1965-66 - $7776 (replacing Dr. Winfield W.

Salisbury) (rank contingent upon completion of all re-

quirements by September 1, 1965 for the Ph. D. degree;

alternate status will be that of Lecturer).



Quenton T. Bowler, Graduate Assistant in History, for the

academic year 1965-66 - $2300



Harold Patrick Brent, Graduate Assistant in English, for

the academic year 1965-66 - $2300



Ronald L. Church, Assistant Professor of Biology, for the

academic year 1965-66 - $8370



Joseph N. Crowley, Instructor in Political Science for the

Spring semester 1966 - $3442 (replacement for Dr. E.

Bushnell during Spring semester sabbatical).



Wilbur A. Davis, Assistant Professor of Sociology and

Anthropology for the period July 1, 1965 to June 30, 1966,

at an annual salary of $7776.



Lawrence Olen Fagan, Jr., Graduate Assistant in English,

for the academic year 1965-66 - $2500



Kathleen Marie Galloway, Graduate Assistant in Mathematics

for the academic year 1965-66 - $2300



Helen Hedges, Lecturer in Sociology for the period Septem-

ber 1, 1965 to January 31, 1966 - $525



Lester J. Hunt, Graduate Research Assistant in Psychology,

for the period July 1 to August 31, 1965 - $900 (plus

waiver of non-resident tuition and registration fee for

both Summer Sessions).



Nancy Lee List, Graduate Assistant in History, for the

academic year 1965-66 - $2300



Ervin Merey-Kadar, Assistant Professor of History for the

academic year 1965-66 - $8370



James Allen Null, Graduate Assistant in Political Science,

for the academic year 1965-66 - $2300



Don Carlos Prusso, Assistant Professor of Biology, for the

academic year 1965-66 - $8073



Francis D. Ross, Graduate Assistant in English, for the

academic year 1965-66 - $2500



Hanna E. Schroeder, Lecturer in Foreign Languages, for the

academic year 1965-66 - $8073



James Garland Strother, Graduate Assistant in English, for

the academic year 1965-66 - $2300



Joyce Hope Weilben, Assistant Professor, Health, Physical

Education and Recreation, for the academic year 1965-66 -

$7182



Edward Folkland Wishart, Assistant Professor of Mathematics,

for the academic year 1965-66 - $8667 (rank and salary con-

tingent upon completion of all requirments for the Ph. D.

degree by September 1, 1965; otherwise, the title will be

that of Lecturer and salary $8370).



Dennis Hume Wrong, Professor, Sociology and Anthropology,

for the academic year 1965-66 - $11,934



Appointments in National Science Foundation Summer Institute

in Mathematics:



Frank E. Alden, Teaching Assistant, for the period June 1

to July 30, 1965 - $600



E. Maurice Beesley, Associate Director, for the period May

15 to August 15, 1965 - $2000



Ronald A. Macauley, Instructor, for the period June 7 to

July 30, 1965 - $1000



Donald C. Pfaff, Instructor, for the period June 7 to

July 30, 1965 - $1000



Robert N. Tompson, Director and Instructor for the period

January 1 to September 30, 1965 - $3800



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION



Ada Dolores Tremewan, Graduate Assistant in Economics, for

the academic year 1965-66 - $1150 (1/2 time).



DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE



Philip L. Altick, Research Assistant, for the period July 1

to August 31, 1965 - $2058



Thomas Burns, Counselor and Field Assistant, for the period

June 1 to July 31, 1965 - $1000



James W. A. Conkey, Lecturer, Summer Science Training Pro-

gram, for the period June 1 to July 31, 1965 - $1200



James E. Deacon, Resident Lecturer, Summer Science Training

Program, for the period June 1 to July 31, 1965 - $1792.80



Edmund George Doherty, Graduate Research Assistant, for

the period July 1 to August 31, 1965 - $800 (plus waiver

for non-resident tuition and registration fee for both

Summer Sessions).



Larry Eaton, Research Assistant, for the period June 1-30,

1965 - $569.66



Dean Evans, Research Assistant, for the period July 1 to

August 31, 1965 - $400 (plus waiver of non-resident tuition

and registration fee).



Donald Fowler, Associate Director, NSF Anthropology Field

Training Program, for the period June 11 to August 31, 1965

- $2404



William Franklin, Field Assistant, for the period June 14

to July 19, 1965 - $475



Bernard Fumagalli, Research Assistant, for the period July 1

to August 31, 1965 - $400 (in addition to salary, this con-

tract provides for a waiver of non-resident tuition and

registration fee).



William H. Jacobsen, Jr., Consultant, NSF Anthropology Field

Training Program, for the period June 12-18, 1965 - $350



Gary Love, Graduate Research Assistant, for the period

June 1 to August 31, 1965 - $1380



Steven C. Mallen, Graduate Research Assistant, for the

academic year 1965-66 - $2300



Lester M. Mc Kay, Research Associate in Biomedical Engi-

neering, for the period April 1, 1965 to June 30, 1966 at

an annual salary rate of $13,964.



Richard G. Miller, Director, Summer Science Training Pro-

gram in Field Ecology, for the period May 1 to July 31,

1965 - $3600



E. Neal Moore, Research Assistant, for the period July 1

to August 31, 1965 - $2124



Robert J. Morris, Professor and Research Associate, for

the period June 1 to July 31, 1965 - $2850, and Consultant,

for the period July 1, 1965 to June 30, 1966 - $4800



Virginia C. Mulvihill, Graduate Research Assistant, for

the period June 15 to August 24, 1965 - $800 (plus waiver

of non-resident tuition and registration fee for the 2nd

Summer Session).



Richard R. Newton, Graduate Research Assistant, for the

period July 1 to August 31, 1965 - $800 (plus waiver of

non-resident tuition and registration fee for both Summer

Sessions).



Donald B. Olsen, Research Biomedical Veterinarian, for a

25-month period beginning June 1, 1965 and ending June 1,

1967, at an annual salary rate of $15,034.



John B. Rogan, Research Associate, for the period July 1 to

August 31, 1965 - $2086.88



William T. Scott, Research Associate, for the period July 1

to August 31, 1965 - $3286



Alex Simirenko, Research Assistant Professor, for the period

June 1 to August 31, 1965 - $2775



Nellie Stark, Lecturer Summer Science Training Program,

for the period June 14 to July 19, 1965 - $1000



Wayne Suttles, Professor and Consultant for NSF Field Train-

ing Program for Anthropologist, for the period July 1-31,

1965 - $1134



Stanton Warburton, Graduate Research Assistant, for the

period July 1 to August 31, 1965 - $800 (plus waiver of

non-resident tuition and registration fee for both Summer

Sessions).



Joseph A. Warburton, Research Associate, for the period

May 27, 1965 to June 30, 1966 at an annual salary rate of

$13,964 and the period July 1, 1966 to June 30, 1967 at

an annual salary of $14,321.



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION



Melvin Dunn, Associate Professor of Elementary Education,

for the academic year 1965-66 - $10,152



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING



Lance J. Agee, Graduate Assistant in Nuclear Engineering,

for the academic year 1965-66 - $2300



Michael D. Blakely, Graduate Assistant in Civil Engineering

for the academic year 1965-66 - $2300



GENERAL UNIVERSITY EXTENSION



Richard Floyd Ammons, Instructor, Civil Defense, for the

period August 1, 1965 to June 30, 1966 at a salary rate

of $8262.



Robert A. Bareiss, Instructor for Engineer in Training

Course, for the period May 18-20, 1965 - $75 (Carson City)



John W. Bird, Instructor for Engineer in Training Course,

for the period April 29 to May 4, 1965 - $75 (Carson City)



M. W. Deming, Instructor for Engineer in Training Course,

for the period May 11, 1965 - $37.50 (Carson City)



Bruce M. Douglas, Instructor for Engineer in Training

Course, for the period May 6, 1965 - $37.50 (Carson City)



Harold E. Hustead, Instructor in Education, for the period

March 1 to June 30, 1965 - $525 (Elko)



Andrew C. Jackson, Instructor, Associate in Science Program,

for the academic year 1965-66 - $6588



Donald A. Kerr, Assistant Professor of Art, for the period

June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $1125



Edwin A. Mc Kinnon, Graduate Assistant in Technical Edu-

cation, for the academic year 1965-66 - $2300



Samuel L. Ornstein, Associate Professor of Psychology, for

the period June 16 to September 1, 1965 - $1400



Francis Ray Rayner, Assistant to Dr. Reed in the Aerospace

Science Workshop, for the period June 14 to July 2, 1965 -

$675



Winfield W. Salisbury II, Assistant Professor of Sociology,

for the period June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $675



Irving J. Sandorf, Instructor for Engineer in Training

Course, for the period April 27, 1965 - $37.50 (Carson City)



George E. Sutton, Instructor for Engineer in Training

Course, for the period May 13, 1965 - $37.50 (Carson City)



John Tibbett, Visiting Professor of Elementary Education

for the period July 26 to August 13, 1965 - $761



Joseph Shubert, Assistant Professor of Library Science,

for the period July 18 to August 13, 1965 - $675



Dirk van der Elst, Instructor in Anthropology, for the

period June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $510



LIBRARY



George Alfred Boyle, Archivist Consultant, for the period

June 1-30, 1965 - $500



MACKAY SCHOOL OF MINES



Donald W. Gentry, Graduate Assistant in Chemical and Metal-

lurgical Engineering, for the academic year 1965-66 - $2300



Olin R. Jennings, Graduate Assistant in Mining, for the

academic year 1965-66 - $2300



E. Richard Larson, Summer Field Geology Camp Director, for

the period June 7 to July 17, 1965 - $2130 (plus field

operating expenses, per diem, vehicle mileage).



John L. Mc Gillis, Graduate Assistant in Geology-Geography,

for the academic year 1965-66 - $2300



Donald E. Ranta, Graduate Laboratory Assistant, Nevada

Mining Analytical Laboratory for the period August 1, 1965

to June 30, 1966 - $2990



NEVADA SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY



John D. Bailiff, Lecturer in Philosophy, for the period

February 4 to June 5, 1960 - $350



Jon A. George, Instructor in English, for the academic year

1965-66 - $6291



Douglas J. Haddad, Instructor in Physics, for the academic

year 1965-66 - $7479



Hilda Jaffee, Assistant Professor of English, for the

academic year 1965-66 - $7182 (rank of Assistant Professor

contingent upon completion of all requirements for Ph. D.

degree by September 1, 1965; otherwise, rank will be that

of Instructor).



Gerald W. Pfaffl, Instructor in Art, for the academic year

1965-66 - $6885



James E. Roberts, Lecturer in Business Law, for the period

February 4 to June 5, 1965 - $525



Donald W. Winne, Lecturer in Business Law, for the period

February 4 to June 5, 1965 - $525



Appointments in the 1965 Summer Session as follows:



Charles L. Adams, Lecturer in Secondary Education and

English, June 15 to August 10, 1965 - $1125



John D. Bailiff, Lecturer in Philosophy, June 15 to August

10, 1965 - $1020



Robert H. Bentley, Lecturer in English, June 15 to August

10, 1965 - $1020



Robert O. Boord, Lecturer in Elementary Education, June 15

to August 10, 1965 - $1800



Henry C. Bozarth, Lecturer in Elementary Education,

August 11-24, 1965 - $450



William E. Bradford, Lecturer in Art, June 15 to August 10,

1965 - $850



Sheilagh Brooks, Lecturer in Anthropology, June 15 to

August 10, 1965 - $1680



William D. Carlson, Lecturer in Education and Psychology,

June 15 to August 10, 1965 - $2485



Howard Chase, Lecturer in Music, June 15 to August 10, 1965

- $1125



Yong Hyo Cho, Lecturer in Political Science, June 15 to

August 10, 1965 - $510



Irvin A. Christenson, Lecturer in Mathematics, June 15 to

August 10, 1965 - $1360



Robert Charles Comeau, Lecturer in Physical Education,

June 15 to August 24, 1965 - $850



Roxie Copenhaver, Lecturer in Education, June 15 to August

10, 1965 - $450



Jerry L. Crawford, Lecturer in English and Speech, June 15

to August 10, 1965 - $1350



Robert D. Cremer, Lecturer in History, June 15 to August

10, 1965 - $675



Christian E. Dolin, Lecturer in French, June 15 to August

24, 1965 - $2250



Ruth Dolin, Lecturer in English, June 15 to August 10,

1965 - $510



Michael Drakulich, Lecturer in Physical Education, June 15

to August 10, 1965 - $900



Scott E. Edwards, Lecturer in Political Science, June 15

to August 10, 1965 - $675



Robert Earl Foster, Lecturer in Elementary Education, June

15 to August 10, 1965 - $1800



Beverly J. Funk, Lecturer in Office Administration, June 15

to August 10, 1965 - $680



Aaron S. Gold, Lecturer in Sociology, August 11-24, 1965 -

$450



Eddie J. Gregory, Lecturer in Physical Education, June 15

to August 10, 1965 - $1125



Miroslav J. Hanak, Lecturer in German, June 15 to August

24, 1965 - $2250



Paul C. Harris, Lecturer in English and Speech, June 15 to

August 10, 1965 - $1350



Holbert H. Hendrix, Lecturer in Elementary Education, June

15 to August 10, 1965 - $2240



Ernest G. Hildner, Jr., Lecturer in History and Geography,

June 15 to August 10, 1965 - $3195



Brent M. Hinze, Lecturer in Psychology, June 15 to August

10, 1965 - $850



Jay W. Jeffers, Lecturer in Geography, June 15 to August

10, 1965 - $1800



A. Rex Johnson, Lecturer in Business Administration, June

15 to August 10, 1965 - $2840



Antonio E. Lapitan, Lecturer in Political Science, June 15

to August 10, 1965 - $510



Sigrid Moe, Lecturer in English, June 15 to August 10,

1965 - $1400



Chad M. Murvosh, Lecturer in Zoology, June 15 to August 10,

1965 - $1125



Peter L. Myer, Lecturer in Art, June 15 to August 10, 1965 -

$1575



Reuben Neumann, Lecturer in Accounting, June 15 to August

10, 1965 - $1800



Jogindar Singh Ratti, Lecturer in Mathematics, June 15 to

August 10, 1965 - $1360



Robert C. Rieke, Lecturer in Economics, June 15 to August

10, 1965 - $1350



Robert M. Roelofs, Lecturer in School Administration,

August 11-24, 1965 - $710



Francis L. Rose, Lecturer in School Administration, June 15

to August 10, 1965 - $1800



Floyd C. Scritchfield, Lecturer in Secondary Education,

June 15 to August 10, 1965 - $2240



Clifford Segerblom, Lecturer in Art, June 15 to August 10,

1965 - $675



Edward M. Singer, Lecturer in English, June 15 to August 10,

1965 - $1500



Robert B. Smith, Lecturer in Chemistry, June 15 to July 10,

1965 - $900



Richard E. Strahlem, Lecturer in Elementary Accounting,

June 15 to August 10, 1965 - $2240



Verdun Trione, Lecturer in Psychology, June 15 to August 10,

1965 - $675



Jack W. Warfield, Lecturer in Education, June 15 to August

10, 1965 - $2240



Herbert C. Wells, Lecturer in Geology, Physical Sciences

and Education, June 15 to August 10, 1965 - $2025



Nelson N. Williams, Lecturer in Biology, June 15 to August

10, 1965 - $1350



Vivienne Worley, Lecturer in Education, June 15 to August

10, 1965 - $2240



John S. Wright, Lecturer in History, June 15 to August 10,

1965 - $2840



Josef Zemek, Lecturer in Spanish, June 15 to August 24, 1965

- $1700



ORVIS SCHOOL OF NURSING



Mary-Louise Atkinson, Assistant Professor of Nursing, for

the academic year 1965-66 - $8370



Annette Ezell, Instructor in Nursing, for the academic year

1965-66 - $5994



UNIVERSITY SERVICES



Paul A. Christie, Mechanical Engineer, for the period June

1, 1965 to June 30, 1966, at an annual salary rate of

$10,044.



Edward L. Pine, Director of Physical Plant, for the period

June 1, 1965 to June 30, 1966, at an annual salary rate of

$15,746.



Motion by Mrs. Magee, seconded by Mr. Davis, carried unani-

mously that the report of personnel appointments be approv-

ed.



8. Acceptance of Gifts



President Armstrong recommended acceptance of the following

gifts and grants received by the University:



Library, Reno Campus, from the following donors:



Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Allen, Carson City - transcripts of

testimony in Nevada water cases, reports, treaties, laws

and maps related to waters and public lands in Nevada,

technical books and 25 volumes of V & T Railroad records.

the 25 volumes are in memory of the late Governor Scrugham

to be placed in the Engineering Library.



Mr. Kenneth L. Ball, San Francisco - collection of typo-

graphia.



The Honorable Walter S. Baring, Washington, D. C. - 1943 to

1951 copies of the "Minerals Yearbook".



Mr. and Mrs. Horace B. Bath, Reno - $25 in memory of Carl

Jacobsen, Peter Jacobsen and in honor of Mrs. Valborg

Jacobsen.



Mr. Clyde Beck, Los Angeles - 13 issues of science fiction

magazines, including first publications of stories by Ray

Bradbury.



Mr. and Mrs. Robert Best, Yerington - $5 in memory of Mr.

Robert Kelley.



The Honorable Howard Cannon, Washington, D. C. - copies

of the new Congressional Directory.



Dr. and Mrs. Edwin Cantlon, Reno - $5 in memory of Michael

Whitehead.



Mrs. Ruth M. Collins, Reno - $25 in memory of Mr. Clyde E.

Collins, to purchase books for the Mines Library.



Mrs. Kenneth Elges, Reno - copy of "Picasso: Women, Cannes

and Mougins", 1954-64.



Mr. Frederick C. Gale, University of Nevada, Reno Campus -

the final MS and galley proofs of his book, "Mortuary

Science".



Judge Clark J. Guild and Mr. Clark J. Guild, Jr., Reno -

$30 to purchase books in memory of Mrs. Breen, Mr. Bernard,

Judge Pirest and Mrs. Dorothy Collins.



Mr. Clark J. Guild, Jr., Reno - $10 in memory of Mrs. Morgan

Smith.



Mr. David K. Hartman, Manlius, New York - a share of General

Electric stock, to purchase bonds in memory of his father,

President Leon Hartman.



Dr. Anthony T. Kruzas, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor -

a copy of University of Michigan's "Special Libraries and

Information Centers".



Ladies Auxiliary of the Nevada Section of the American

Society of Civil Engineers - $300 to the Bixby-Boardman

Memorial Library Fund.



Mr. Jud Lamb, Carson City - 142 volumes of V & T Railroad

and Carson and Colorado Railroad records.



Mrs. W. B. Ligon, Reno - $5 in memory of Michael Whitehead.



Mrs. Virginia Malbin, Berkeley, California - a copy of

"Lenin" (Ogiz, 1939), valued at $75.



Mrs. Andrew Marshall, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts - a copy

of the "Colby Library Quarterly", September, 1964 and

"Chronicle from the Nineteenth Century".



Mr. Will E. Melarkey, Honolulu, Hawaii - $15



Mr. and Mrs. Dan Mobly, Panther Valley - several books.



Mr. and Mrs. Hutchinson Nenzel, Reno - 67 books.



Nevada State Museum, Carson City - will deposit its manu-

script collections in the University of Nevada Library.



Northern Nevada Dental Society Auxiliary, Reno - $25 in

memory of Michael Whitehead.



Mr. Joel Orlen, Desert Research Institute - a copy of

Goncharov's "Oblamov" and Turgenev's "Sportsman's Sketches".



Mr. James E. Russell, Educational Policies Commission,

Washington, D. C - copies of "Educational Responsibilities

of the Federal Government", "The Unique Role of the Super-

intendent of Schools" and "The Public Interest in How

Teachers Organize".



Mr. Hugh A. Shamberger, Desert Research Institute - his

monograph "The Evolution of Nevada by Boundaries with Place

Names".



Mrs. Genevieve Slater, Mc Gill - a copy of Professor

Elliott's "Early History of White Pine County".



Mr. Alfred Merritt Smith, Los Gatos, California - his papers

and books covering his work in Nevada over the past 30 years

valued at $1200.



Southwest Gas Corporation, Nevada - 5 autographed sets of

Mrs. Nell Murbarger's books in memory of Mr. H. G. Laub.

These books will be shared with the Nevada Southern Library.



Mrs. G. W. Walts, Reno - $5 in memory of Michael Whitehead.



Library, Las Vegas Campus, from the following donors:



Clark County Attorneys' Wives Association, Las Vegas - $200

to purchase books in the area of Law.



Flamingo Hotel employees, Las Vegas - $25 in memory of Paul

W. Lawler.



Foley Brothers of Las Vegas - $20 in memory of Penelope

Leavitt and Mr. Nathan Mack.



Miss Veronica Genessey, Lovelock - 100 "Public Health Re-

ports" magazines and 100 copies of "The American Journal

of Nursing", to be used for the Associate in Nursing

Degree program.



Miss Charity Goudie, New York - $2



Las Vegas Board of Realtors - $100 to purchase books on Real

Estate.



Charles I. Naylor, Las Vegas - $25 in memory of Mr. Nathan

Mack.



Scholarships and Prizes payments for both Campuses as

follows:



The Hancock Foundation, Reno - $2000 for the Washoe County

Eagle Scout Scholarship.



Mr. Raymond L. Knisley, Lovelock - $250



Legislative Press Corps of Nevada, Reno - $360 for the Mark

Twain Scholarship in Journalism.



National Distillers and Chemical Corporation, New York -

$100



Nevada Congress of Parents and Teachers, Sparks - $400, $100

of which will be used for a Nevada Southern graduate in the

field of Elementary Education and $100 to be used for a

Nevada Southern graduate in the field of Secondary Education

who have signed contracts to teach in Nevada. The remaining

$200 will be used by College of Education graduates on the

Reno Campus.



Nevada State Pharmaceutical Association, Women's Auxiliary,

Reno - $425



Quota Club of Reno - $50 for an Orvis School of Nursing

Scholarship.



Mrs. J. L. Semenza, Reno - $100 as a scholarship for a stu-

dent in Business Administration.



Society of Public Accountants, Northern District of Nevada,

Reno - $100 to the Zinn-Peck Memorial Scholarship.



Soroptimist Club of Reno - $500



Soroptimist Club of Sparks - $160



Washoe County Medical Society, Women's Auxiliary, Reno -

$1500 for 3 scholarships of $500 each in the Orvis School

of Nursing.



Western Electronic Education Fund, Los Angeles - $500



Zona Club of Reno - $100



Nevada Southern Art Gallery, from the following donors:



Dr. William B. Harris, Las Vegas - $25



Dr. and Mrs. Reuben Zucker, Las Vegas - $25



Miscellaneous Gifts from the following donors:



Anonymous Donor - $100 for the 1965 Edwin Booth Award for

service to the Theater.



Anine Bloch Christensen Estate, Reno - stock valued at

$69,537.13 to be used exclusively for charitable and edu-

cational purposes, $2500 in cah and a quantity of flat

silverware which has been inventoried. (Particular note

was taken of Mrs. Eva Scales' devoted service over a period

of 35 years to the late Mrs. Christensen.)



Dr. Howard P. Eells, Jr., Reno - $325 to the Mackay School

of Mines to pay the transportation cost of Dr. Joseph

Lintz's attendance at a science meeting at Williams College,

Massachusetts.



Mrs. A. E. Glass, Reno - files of the Mc Farlin Estate,

the history of the First National Bank of Nevada, Mayor

John A. Cooper's plan for a Reno Relief Program, the Nevada

Day Program, a map of the Second Byrd Expedition, copies of

the "Delineator", and several copies of the Reno Telephone

Book, to the Center for Western North American Studies.



Mr. Ruperto B. Jagolina, Manila, Philippine Islands - 8

geologic maps on the Geology of the Philippines, to the

Mackay School of Mines Library.



Mr. Darrell Lemaire, Reno - Model 100 Semi Micro Pulverizer,

valued at $180, to the Mackay School of Mines.



Mr. John W. Mackay, Mineola, N. Y. - the original inventory

(handwritten) of the Comstock silverware as made by Tiffany

& Co., New York, in May of 1879.



National Automobile Dealers Association, Carson City - $1000

for the use of the Music Department.



Northern Nevada Association of Mental Health, Reno - $80 to

pay for the services of a student as a research assistant

performing work in the area of suicide, under the direction

of Dr. James B. Nickels, Psychological Service Center.



Bartow W. Van Voorhis, Jr., Reno - 2 rare and fine specimens

of doubly-terminated tourmaline from Brazil to the Mackay

School of Mines Museum.



Viobin Corporation, Monticello, Illinois - $700 to support

a research project comparing wheat germ oil and animal fat

plus plant and animal sterols to be conducted by the College

of Agriculture.



Mr. Lawrence B. Wright, San Francisco - a collection of

books and maps, valued at $112, on the mineral industry

to the Mackay School of Mines Library.



Grants as follows:



From the Department of Health, Education and Welfare:



$3,300 as a Traineeship Grant in the Orvis School of

Nursing, under the direction of Dean Marjorie J.

Elmore.



$149,475 to participate in the College Work-Study

Program under authority of Title I, Part C, of the

Economic Opportunity Act of 1964, for the academic

year 1965-66.



$15,000 to assist in the preparation of professional

personnel in the education of mentally retarded child-

ren, under the direction of the College of Education.



$30,322 to support a program entitled "Psychiatric

Nursing", under the direction of Dean Marjorie J.

Elmore, Mrs. Merla J. Olsen and Miss Margaret Aasterud,

Orvis School of Nursing.



From the National Science Foundation:



$7,380 for support of an "In-Service Institute in Math-

ematics for Elementary School Personnel for 1965-66",

under the direction of Dr. E. M. Beesley, Department

of Mathematics.



$6,100 for the purchase of undergraduate instructional

scientific equipment, under direction of Mr. Herbert

C. Wells, Assistant Professor of Engineering Science,

Nevada Southern University.



$20,400 to support research entitled "Washoe Archae-

ology", under the direction of Dr. Wilbur A. Davis,

Desert Research Institute.



$1,610 in support of a program entitled "Visting

Scientists (Secondary Schools)", under the direction

of Dr. E. M. Beesley, Department of Mathematics.



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Ronzone, carried

unanimously that the gifts be accepted and the Secretary

send appropriate notes of thanks to the donors.



9. Estimative Budgets for 1965-66



President Armstrong recommended the approval of the Esti-

mative Budgets for 1965-66, as prepared and submitted by

Mr. Humphrey.



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Dr. Lombardi, carried

unanimously that the Estimative Budgets be approved as

submitted.



10. Policy for Investment of Surplus Operating Capital



President Armstrong presented the following letter from Mr.

Humphrey, with his recommendation for approval of the pro-

posed policy:



"As you know, for the past 4 years we have followed an

aggressive policy of investment in U. S. Treasury Bills

of surplus operating capital. These investments will

earn $101,637.00 during 1964-65 fiscal year ($33,558.27)

to General University Operation, $39,110.60 to Board of

Regents Special Projects Fund, $28,751.17 to various

plant accounts, and $216,87 to NSU Foundation). The

current interest rate on these Bills is 3.80% to 3.96%.



"The Security National Bank of Nevada has offered to pay

interest of 4% on 90 day maturities and 4 1/2% on six

month to one year maturities on time certificates of

deposit. This interest rate is better than Treasury

Bills are currently paying but has the disadvantage of

being less flexible.



"I recommend that the Board of Regents approve the use

of time certificates of deposit, subject to 110% col-

lateral agreements, for investment of surplus operating

capital. This authorization to be in addition to, and

not a substitute for, authorization to purchase U. S.

Treasury Bills."



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Davis, carried

unanimously that the policy as proposed be approved.



11. Post Sale Resolution Concerning Revenue Certificates for

Nye Hall



President Armstrong recommended adoption of the following

resolution concerning revenue certificates for Nye Hall:



RESOLUTION NO. 65-10



CONCERNING THE ISSUANCE BY THE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE

UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA OF THE UNIVERSITY'S OBLIGATIONS

DESIGNATED AS THE "UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA HOUSING REVENUE

CERTIFICATES OF 1965", IN THE PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF

$2,400,000.00, FOR THE PURPOSE OF ACQUIRING FOR THE

UNIVERSITY A MEN'S AND WOMEN'S DORMITORY; ACCEPTING THE

BEST (AND ONLY) BID FOR THE PURCHASE OF THE CERTIFI-

CATES; AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE OF A SINGLE CERTIFICATE

IN THE PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF $2,400,000.00; DESIGNATING

THE PURCHASER THEREOF, FIXING THE PRICE TO BE PAID

THEREFOR, PROVIDING THE INTEREST RATE THE PRINCIPAL

OF THE SINGLE CERTIFICATE SHALL BEAR, AND PROVIDING

OTHER DETAILS CONCERNING THE CERTIFICATE AND THE

DORMITORY FACILITIES; RATIFYING ACTION HERETOFORE TAKEN

TOWARD ACQUIRING THE DORMITORY FACILITIES AND ISSUING

THE SINGLE CERTIFICATE; AND REPEALING ALL RESOLUTIONS

IN CONFLICT HEREWITH.



Motion by Mr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried unani-

mously that the above resolution be adopted.



12. Revised Traffic and Parking Code



President Armstrong presented the following revised Traffic

and Parking Code, prepared by Mr. Humphrey's staff, and

recommended its adoption by the Board. Mr. Humphrey in-

dicated that this Code has been presented to the Attorney

General's Office for review and stated that any amendment

arising from this review would, of course, be brought back

to the Board for approval.



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Ronzone, carried

unanimously that the following Traffic and Parking Code

be approved, subject to review by the Attorney General's

Office.



TRAFFIC CODE



As Authorized By



Chapter 212, Statutes of Nevada, 1959

Chapter 159, Statutes of Nevada, 1965



Effective July 1, 1965



SECTION I CONTROL AUTHORIZATION



Article 1.01 Vehicle Control Established



No motor vehicle or bicycle shall be operated, parked or

otherwise used on the Campus of the University of Nevada

except in strict conformity with this Traffic Code estab-

lished and published by the Board of Regents of the Uni-

versity of Nevada.



Article 1.02 University Police, Nevada



The Board of Regents shall create a Police Department and

shall appoint one or more persons to be members of such

Department. Persons appointed shall be duly sworn as

Peace Officers. It shall be the duty of the University

Police to enforce all State and local laws and ordinances

and to enforce the University Traffic Code as established

by the Board of Regents.



Article 1.03 Vehicle Registration



All vehicles owned, operated, parked or otherwise used on

the University property by students, faculty or University

staff shall be officially registered by the University.

No vehicle may be so used by such persons on the University

Campus unless a current official registration sticker is

clearly and legibly displayed as directed by the University

Police.



Article 1.04 Parking Zones Provided



Parking areas on the Campus shall be divided into certain

zones which shall be classified as Unassigned, Restricted,

Reserved, 24-Hour, Time-Limit, and No Parking. The Univer-

sity Traffic and Parking Board shall establish from time

to time such other zones as it shall find desirable and

proper. Vehicles shall park only in designated parking

areas.



Zone A Unassigned



An unassigned zone shall be one in which all registered

vehicles may park in an orderly fashion between the

hours of 7 A.M. and 11 P.M., Monday through Saturday.

Spaces in this zone shall not be assigned to a spe-

cific individual or vehicle.



Zone B Restricted



A restricted zone shall be one in which registered

faculty and staff vehicles may park in an orderly

fashion between the hours of 6 A.M. and 12 midnight,

during any day of the week. Spaces in this zone shall

not be assigned to a specific vehicle or individual.

Zone B vehicles may be parked in Zone A when necessary.



Zone C Reserved



A reserved zone shall be one which shall be reserved

for specific individual vehicles. Permits for Zone C

shall be issued to individuals the nature of whose

service to the University shall require frequent daily

use of a personal vehicle.



Zone D 24-Hour



24-hour zones shall be zones which have been established

for the use of residents living in on-Campus housing.

No vehicles shall be parked overnight on the Campus,

except when authorized by registration to use such 24-

hour zones. A vehicle registered in a 24-hour zone

may not be used or parked elsewhere on the Campus.



Zone E Time-Limit



A time-limit zone shall be one which is established to

allow parking for a definite limited length of time

not to exceed 15 minutes.



Visitor Zone



Visitor parking zones shall be established to allow

parking for University visitors. No student, staff

or faculty vehicles shall be parked in a visitor

parking zone.



Article 1.06 Qualifications for Zone Permits



Permits for parking within Zones A, B, C or D shall be

issued by the University Police under the following con-

ditions:



Zone A: Undergraduates and graduate students and non-

academic part-time staff shall be issued per-

mits in Zone A, except as hereinafter permit-

ed. Persons normally assignable to Zone A may,

for reasons of health, be issued a permit for

Zone Staff A or Zone B. Vehicles operated by

students regardless of their permit assigned,

shall park in student parking areas unless

permission is granted by the Traffic and Park-

ing Board for use of another area.



Staff A: Classified, technical and graduate assistant

employees shall be issued permits in Staff A

zones except as hereinafter permitted.



Zone B: Professional personnel shall be issued permits

in Zone B except as hereinafter permitted.



Zone C: Those persons whose official duties with the

University of Nevada require the frequent daily

use of a personal vehicle may be issued permits

in Zone C. Persons normally assignable to Zone

A or B may, for reasons of health or other

extenuating circumstances, be issued a permit

in Zone C. Such permits shall be issued only

upon the approval of the University Traffic

and Parking Board.



Zone D: Students and staff members residing in on-

Campus housing shall be issued permits in

Zone D. Persons living in University Village

may, for reasons deemed suitable by the Traf-

fic and Parking Board, be issued a permit

in Zones A, B or C.



Article 1.07 Parking Zones Established



The University Traffic and Parking Board shall classify the

parking areas on the Campus into the various zones herein

or hereafter provided from time to time as it may deem

suitable and proper.



Article 1.08 Code Effective



This Traffic Code for the University of Nevada shall become

effective upon approval by the Board of Regents of the

University of Nevada.



Article 1.09 University Traffic and Parking Board



There shall be established a Traffic and Parking Board for

the University of Nevada, Reno Campus, and a separate

Board for Nevada Southern University. It shall be the duty

of each Board to establish parking zones, to hear appeals

and to otherwise cooperate with the University Police in

maintaining traffic order and safety.



A Board of five members shall be appointed by the Presi-

dent. Faculty, non-academic staff and students should be

represented. A staff member of the Director of Physical

Plant shall serve as the non-voting Secretary and con-

sultant to the Board. The Board shall meet at least once

each month during the academic year and written minutes

shall be kept of all meetings. Three voting members shall

constitute a quorum and a majority of those present shall

be necessary for adoption of any action.



SECTION II VEHICLE PARKING REGULATIONS



Article 2.01 Intersections



No vehicle shall be parked within 5 feet of the intersection

of any paved or unpaved roadways on the University Campus.



Article 2.02 Crosswalks



No vehicle shall be parked on any marked or otherwise indi-

cated crosswalk on the University Campus.



Article 2.03 Sidewalks



No vehicle shall be parked on any paved or unpaved sidewalk,

nor shall any vehicle be driven across or over any curbing

or sidewalk on the University Campus.



Article 2.04 Lawns



No vehicle shall be driven on to, across, or parked on any

lawns or planted area on the University Campus.



Article 2.05 Fire Hydrants



No vehicle shall be parked within 15 feet of any fire

hydrant or fire alarm box on the University Campus.



Article 2.06 Driveways



No vehicle shall be parked in or across any driveway,

whether paved or unpaved on the University Campus.



Article 2.07 Excavations



No vehicle shall be parked alongside or opposite any ex-

cavation on the University Campus.



Article 2.08 Double Parking



No vehicle shall be parked or allowed to stand upon a street

or other travelled way on the roadway side of another vehi-

cle parked at the curb of said street or travelway.



Article 2.09 Obstructing Traffic



No vehicle shall be parked in a line of traffic so as to

obstruct such traffic nor shall any other action be taken

which will impede the smooth and steady flow of traffic.



Article 2.10 Entrances to Buildings



No vehicle shall be parked in a manner so as to block the

entrance to any building or so as to impede the easy access

to such building for emergency and service vehicles.



Article 2.11 Large Vehicles



No vehicle more than 21 feet in length shall be parked on

the University of Nevada Campus without the specific prior

approval of the University Police.



Article 2.12 Parallel Parking



No vehicle shall be parked on the Campus on a roadway other

than parallel with the edge of the roadway, headed in the

direction of traffic, except in those areas which are

specifically marked otherwise.



Article 2.13 Parking Within Markers



No vehicle shall be parked in such a manner that it is on

or overlaps any parking line which is marked on the surface

of the street or roadway.



Article 2.14 No Parking Zone



No vehicle shall be parked in an area which has been desig-

nated as a no parking or stopping area. Areas not marked

for parking, all red curbs and areas posted with no parking

signs shall be no parking zones.



Article 2.15 Unattended Vehicles



No vehicle shall be parked and left with the motor running,

or without the brakes having been set, or when on a hill,

without the wheels having been turned.



Article 2.16 Unauthorized Parking



No person shall park or otherwise use a vehicle on the Uni-

versity Campus without clearing displaying the registration

sticker authorized for that vehicle, nor shall any person

park a vehicle in any zone other than that currently as-

signed to that vehicle, except as hereinbefore specified.



SECTION III VEHICLE USE REGULATIONS



Article 3.01 Pedestrian Right-of-Way



Pedestrians shall have the right-of-way at all times.



Article 3.02 Speed Limit



No person shall drive or otherwise operate a vehicle on the

University Campus at a rate of speed which is excessive for

the conditions of traffic or weather, nor at any time at a

speed exceeding 15 miles per hour.



Article 3.03 Reckless Driving



No person shall drive or otherwise operate a vehicle on the

University Campus in a reckless or otherwise careless manner

which would endanger life or property.



Article 3.04 Closing Streets to Traffic



The University Police may at any time close any street or

travelled driveway to all traffic with the exception of

emergency vehicles and authorized service vehicles. The

closing of such roadways shall be established by the

erection of barricades, gates, obstructions, signs or

other approved devices.



Article 3.05 Crossing or Removing Barricades



When street or roadways have been closed by the University,

Police or other authorized University personnel, no vehicle

shall be driven or otherwise caused to cross such barricade

lines or pass such official signs of closure nor shall any

person other than those specifically authorized remove or

otherwise destroy such barricade or closure signs.



Article 3.06 Official Signs and Notices



No person shall drive or otherwise operate a vehicle on the

University Campus, except in obedience to all official traf-

fic signs and notices, nor shall any person deface, remove

or injure any such official sign.



Article 3.07 Obeying University Police



It shall be in violation of these traffic regulations to

fail to comply with a lawful order, signal or direction of

a member of the University Police.



Article 3.08 Intoxicated Persons



No person shall be in or about a motor vehicle on the Uni-

versity Campus while either intoxicated or under the influ-

ence of intoxicating liquors.



Article 3.09 Drivers License and State Registration

Certificates



No person shall operate a motor vehicle on the University

Campus without being the holder of a valid operators or

chauffeurs license. No motor vehicle shall be parked on

the Campus without displaying in full view a valid Vehicle

Registration Certificate.



Article 3.10 Mufflers



No person shall drive or otherwise operate a motor vehicle

not equipped with a good and sufficient muffler, property

attached thereto. Nor shall any vehicle be operated which

shall permit pipes, mufflers, or other devices to emit the

sound of exhaust in a loud or annoying manner.



SECTION IV ENFORCEMENT



Article 4.01 Citation for Violations



A. Violation of State Law



In the event of the violation of State Laws,

the University Police shall issue State ci-

tations. Such citations shall be considered

by the local Justice Court.



B. Violations of University Traffic Code



The University Police are hereby authorized

to issue citations to persons or vehicles

found to be in violation of this Traffic

Code. Upon the issuance of such citations

the University of Nevada registration sticker

shall be suspended from the offending vehicle

and Campus parking and use privileges with-

held until such time as the registration has

been reinstated, as provided in Article 4.02.



Article 4.02 Fees for Reinstating Parking Privileges



A. For citations issued for minor violations of

the Traffic Code a fee of $1 shall be payable

within 5 calendar days in order to reinstate

the registration sticker and parking and use

privileges. Minor violations shall include

parking in improper zones, improperly parked,

parking without a registration sticker and

overparking in time zones.



B. For citations issued for major violations of

the Traffic Code a fee of $5 shall be payable

within 5 calendar days in order to reinstate

the registration ticker and parking and use

privileges. Major violations shall include

all violations not listed as minor.



C. Should any person or vehicle be found in vi-

olation of the Traffic Code for the 4th time

in any one school year, the registration

sticker shall be revoked and, upon the recom-

mendations of the University Traffic and

Parking Board, parking privileges may be

permanently denied.



D. Any citation fee not paid within 5 calendar

days shall be considered delinquent. The

fee on any delinquent violation shall be

doubled.



E. Adequate administrative procedures shall be

enforced to collect traffic citation fees.

This shall include the following: financial

holds against student records and, after

appropriate written notification, towing and

impounding of vehicle.



Article 4.03 Impounding Vehicles



Any vehicle of any kind or description whatever found parked

at a place or in a manner prohibited or declared to be in

violation of these regulations of stopping, standing or

parking is hereby declared to constitute a nuisance, and

may be impounded by the University Police, and shall only

be surrendered to the duly identified owner, or to the duly

authorized agent of such owner, upon payment of the neces-

sary traffic citation fees, towing and storage charges.



Article 4.04 Penalties for Violations



Any student who shall use or park any vehicle on the Uni-

versity Campus without a valid official registration sticker

properly affixed or who shall use or park such vehicle other

than in strict compliance with this Traffic Code, shall be

considered to be in violation of the rules and regulations

properly established by the Board of Regents of the Univer-

sity of Nevada and shall be subject to all fees enumerated

above and to disciplinary action. Employees of the Univer-

sity violating these regulations shall be subject to the

fees enumerated above.



Article 4.05 Appeal



Any citation issued or any fee charged which is not delin-

quent may be appealed in writing to the Traffic and Parking

Board (care of Director of Physical Plant). Citations which

have been appealed shall not be subject to the 5 calendar

day limit until a decision has been reached by the Traffic

and Parking Board regarding the appeal. No delinquent

citation or fee will be considered for appeal.



13. Class A Action, Requirements for Graduation



The following Class A action, as approved by the faculty,

the University Council and the Academic Council, was pre-

sented to the Regents with President Armstrong's recommenda-

tion for approval:



Class A, Procedure I



(Refer to pages 11-12 of the University Code for the regu-

lations governing Class A actions, Procedure I.)



I. Requirements for Graduation



The University Policy Committee on Academic Standards has

recommended, and the University Council has approved, the

following changes in the requirements for graduation.



A. The capitalized portion represents changes recommended

under "Resident Credit Requirements", page 41 of the

Catalog of General Information, 1964-66 edition, or

page 36 of the 1964-65 edition, beginning with the 4th

line.



"To be eligible for graduation from the University of

Nevada each CANDIDATE FOR THE BACCALAUREATE DEGREE must

satisfy one of the following resident credit require-

ments:



1. A student who has earned a minimum of 3/4 of the

total acceptable credits of a specified degree re-

quirement in resident credit MAY EARN A MAXIMUM

OF 8 ACCEPTABLE TRANSFER CREDITS DURING THE SENIOR

YEAR WHICH MAY BE APPLIED TOWARD THE DEGREE. Pre-

medical and prelegal students who have completed 3

years of approved resident credit may complete the

LAST 32 CREDITS by satisfactory work in a profes-

sional school."



B. The recommended change in Item 2, "Resident Credit

Requirement" is capitalized.



"A student who has earned less than 3/4 of the total

acceptable credits of a specific degree at the Univer-

sity must complete the last 32 RESIDENT CREDITS in un-

interrupted resident credit in the College from which

the degree is expected."



C. In order to conform with the above changes, Item 5 under

subtopic "Advanced Standing Regulations", page 29 of

1964-66 edition, or page 27 of the 1964-65 edition of

the Catalog of General Information, is to be changed as

capitalized.



"Credits transfers from an accredited 4-year education

institution may be accepted TO WITHIN 32 SEMESTER

CREDITS OF THE TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR THE DEGREE."



Motion by Mrs. Magee, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen, carried

unanimously that the above Class A action be approved.



14. Proposed Ph. D. Degree Program in History



President Armstrong reviewed for the Board a request from

the College of Arts and Science to offer a doctoral program

in History with specialization in limited areas in the

History of Nevada, Western United States, and Immigration,

beginning in the Fall of 1965. This proposal has been re-

viewed by the University Council and approved by the Aca-

demic Council and was submitted to the Board with President

Armstrong's approval. The proposal contained the following

requirements for the Ph. D. degree in History:



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PH. D. DEGREE IN HISTORY



1. The potential candidate should familiarize himself with

the general Graduate Study requirements outlined in the

University of Nevada catalog. The candidate is respon-

sible for meeting all requirements outlined below.



2. Applicants for candidacy must hold the Master of Arts

degree and must pass the departmental doctoral quali-

fying examination during the first 5 weeks of their

enrollment beyond the Masters degree.



3. The Department Chairman will appoint an adviser who

will assist the candidate in preparing his program

of studies. Before the candidate proceeds beyong

completion of 24 credits he must have secured the

agreement of a member of the Department to supervise

his doctoral dissertation, by which time the candi-

dates's Advisory Committee will have been appointed.



4. A graduate major in the field of History will not be

granted graduate credit for any course taken in his

major field in which the final grade is below "B".



5. Additional written work will be required in each 400-

level course taken for graduate credit in the Depart-

ment of History.



6. All candidates who have not completed a course in

Historiography are required to take History 583.



7. Candidates must complete 48 credits in course work, 15

of which must be in Modern European History and 15 in

United States History. 9 credits must be completed

in the student's cognate field.



8. Of the candidate's course work, 12 credits must be in

seminars in History.



9. A reading knowledge of 2 foreign languages, other than

the candidate's native language, shall be required,

the selection to be determined by the Department.

The Department will select languages which have ex-

tensive literature in the candidate's field. Both

language requirements must be completed before the

comprehensive examinations can be taken.



10. Each candidate must pass comprehensive written examin-

ations in 3 fields of History outside the candidate's

major field, which are normally to be taken within a

2-week period during the candidate's 4th semester. All

papers will be read by at least 2 members of the De-

partment. The student may arrange for re-examination

in case of failure.



11. Upon successful completion of the written examinations,

a comprehensive oral examination in the applicant's

major and cognate fields will be scheduled, normally

3 weeks after the last written examination. The stu-

dent may arrange for re-examination in case of failure,

provided the Examining Board feels that additional

study is justified.



12. The student is formally admitted to candidacy upon

passing the comprehensive examinations. After the

doctoral dissertation has been accepted by the Advisory

Committee, a final oral examination on the dissertation

and related topics will be conducted.



13. The Turabian "Manual for Writers" ... will be authori-

tative guide to style and form for all doctoral dis-

sertations. Each candidate should also thoroughly

familiarize himself with parts I and II of the "Harvard

Guide to American History" and Barzun & Graff, "The

Modern Researcher".



Motion by Mrs. Magee, seconded by Mr. Ronzone, carried unai-

mously that the proposed Ph. D. Degree program in History

be approved.



15. Signature Authority for Business Manager, Nevada Southern

University



The following request from Mr. Humphrey was presented to

the Board with President Armstrong's recommendation for ap-

proval:



"On May 8, 1965 the Board of Regents authorized the

establishment of a $3000 revolving fund at Valley Bank

of Nevada to accommodate emergency purchases. It would

be most convenient if Herman W. Westfall, Business Man-

ager, Nevada Southern University, could be authorized

by the Board of Regents to have signature authority on

this account. Currently signature authority on all

accounts is limited to the Vice President-Finance and

the Chief Accountant, Henry M. Hattori. I suggest

adding Mr. Westfall on this one account only. Effec-

tive July 1, 1965 his bond was increased to $100,000.



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Davis, carried

unanimously that signature authority for Mr. Westfall be

approved as requested.



16. Resolution from Western Snow Conference



President Armstrong read to the Board the following resolu-

tion, passed by the Western Snow Conference at its recent

meeting in Colorado Springs concerning Professor Boardman:



WHEREAS, Professor Horace Prentis Boardman, who passed

away in January, 1965 was an honorary member of the

Western Snow Conference; was a man whose contributions

to the field of water supply forecasting truly laid the

foundation for the acceptance of snow surveying as an

engineering tool; was a man whose work was always mark-

ed by selflessness and encouragement to others; was a

man whose leadership become part of the wealth of each

of his students during his 32 years as Head of the

Civil Engineering Department of the University of

Nevada; was a man whose character enriched the lives

of all who came to know him and was a friend to all,



NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that those assembled

here at the 1965 meeting of the Western Snow Conference

stand in tribute to his memory and to the values that

he so wonderfully demonstrated in all of his actions

and that this session be dedicated in his honor, and



BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that a copy of this Resolution

be transmitted by the General Chairman of the Western

Snow Conference to members of his family, to the Presi-

dent of the University of Nevada, and to the Governor

of the State of Nevada, so that all may be reminded of

our debt to the accomplishments and the high example

in dedication to worthy principles that marked his

life.



17. Report of Student Affairs Committee Meeting of June 10, 1965



Mr. Davis presented the minutes of the meeting as follows:



The Student Affairs Committee met in the Travis Lounge of

the Student Union on Thursday, June 10, 1965. Present:

Regents Anderson, Davis, Grant, Hug and Magee; President

Armstrong, and Vice President Humphrey. Dean Irwin, Dean

Basta, Mr. Echeverria, Dr. Lintz and Dr. Wells were pres-

ent for a portion of the meeting.



The meeting was called to order at 4:00 P.M.



1. Recommendations concerning the Marching Band



President Armstrong reviewed for the Committee the

earlier discussions concerning a Marching Band for the

University, and presented the following letter from

Dr. Broten, Mr. Lawler, Dr. Carrico and Mike Ingersoll,

acting as a committee, containing their recommendations:



The purpose of this letter is to submit to you the

final recommendations of the Committee assigned by

the Board of Regents to explore the most feasible

method of financing the University Marching Band.

The Committee has met several times for discussion

on the matter, and has submitted certain general

recommendations for consideration to the ASUN

Finance Control Board. Agreement has been reached

by the Committee and the ASUN Finance Control Board

with recommendations as follows:



1. The size of the Marching Band shall range, in

the beginning from 60 to 70 pieces.



2. The Marching Band shall play at all home foot-

ball games and in the Homecoming Parade.



3. There shall be a pep band to play at all home

basketball games.



4. There shall be one overnight trip for the band

in the Fall at one of the conference football

games.



5. The Band Director shall submit semester finan-

cial reports of band activities to the ASUN

Finance Control Board.



6. The Marching Band shall receive 50 cents per

ASUN student per semester, and this amount shall

be deducted from the $6 athletic ASUN allotment.



If there is any need for further work or clarifica-

tion on this matter the Committee is most willing

to carry out any additional instructions.



Motion by Mrs. Magee, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried

unanimously that the recommendation of the Committee

on the Marching Band be recommended to the Board for

approval.



2. Foreign Study Program



As requested by the Board at its meeting in May 1964,

Benny Echeverria had prepared and submitted a report

on the feasibility of a foreign study program at the

University of Nevada. The Committee reviewed the report

and discussed its contents with those members of the

staff who were present.



Motion by Mrs. Magee, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried unai-

mously that the Committee accept the report and recom-

mended to the Board its consideration of the following

Conclusions and Recommendations contained in the report.



CONCLUSIONS



The opinion surveys, completed by students and Depart-

ment Chairmen indicated much apparent support for a

foreign study program at the University of Nevada.

Meetings with representatives of the Institute of Euro-

pean Studies and the Experiment in International Living

indicated the willingness of established organizations

to aid the University of Nevada in their efforts to

establish a foreign study program.



The Foreign Student Committee of the Student Affairs

Board has been concerned with basically the foreign

student program, e. g., development of working policies

and procedures. This Foreign Student Committee has not

represented all groups and individuals interested in a

foreign study program wherein Nevada students are sent

abroad. Also, a foreign study program would probably

entail discussion of curriculum adaptations and addi-

tions. Therefore, there would appear to be a need for

a representative committee to do further study and

adoption of a foreign study program for the University

of Nevada. Such a committee, having fulfilled its

organization duties, might well revert to those tasks

of screening applicants and approving foreign study

programs for individual students.



RECOMMENDATIONS



The following recommendations are made to the President

of the University and to the Board of Regents by the

researcher after guidance from interested Department

Chairmen, individual faculty members and staff. The

researcher recommends that:



A. This report be approved by the President of the

Board of Regents.



B. An ad-hoc committee be appointed by the President

of the University to give further study to the

proposed foreign study programs and present pro-

posals to the Curriculum Committee, the Academic

Deans' Committee and other appropriate committees

regarding the foreign study program.



C. The ad-hoc committee be chaired by an individual

such as the Assistant Dean of the College of Arts

and Science or the Chairman of the Foreign Language

Department.



D. The ad-hoc committee for foreign study programs be

allowed to negotiate a program with the Experiment

in International Living, and any other bonafide

group offering a similary attractive program of

foreign study.



E. The Board of Regents consider possible financial

assistance for a foreign study program.



F. The President and the Board of Regents consider the

necessary adjustments in, and possible addition to,

the administrative staff necessary to administer an

approved foreign study program.



The meeting adjourned at 4:30 P.M.



Action of the Board:



Item #1 Motion by Mr. Davis, seconded by Mrs. Magee,

carried unanimously that the recommendations of

the Committee be approved.



Item #2 Motion by Mr. Davis, seconded by Mrs. Magee,

carried unanimously that the recommendations con-

tained in the report be approved by the Board,

subject to further study by the staff.



18. Upon motion by Mr. Ronzone, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen, it

was unanimously voted to request Mr. Hug and Mr. Davis to

attend the University Attorney's meeting in New Orleans

on June 23 on behalf of the University.



19. Transfer of Funds



President Armstrong reviewed for the Board conditions under

which the Henry Albert Senior Public Service Award was es-

tablished, noting that the earnings from the endowment were

to go to 4 graduating Seniors in the form of cash prizes.

The price amount was set at $37.50 each because of the an-

ticipated earnings. Over the years, however, the annual

earnings have been considerablfy greater than 4 times that

figure (i. e., $150) and there is now a free balance of

$2815 in the account. Dr. Mc Queen, Scholarship Chairman,

has requested that the prize amounts be increased and that

the free balance be transfered to the endowment account.

Mr. Humphrey has reviewed the request and has recommended,

with President Armstrong's endorsement, the following:



a. Increase the prize amounts to an even $50;



b. Transfer $2600 from 1-51-6003, Henry W. Albert Endowment

Endowment to 1-71-6003, Henry W. Albert Endowment.



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Ronzone, carried

unanimously that the above recommendations be approved.



President Armstrong reported the following transers of less

that $2000 from the Contingency Reserve:



#246 $200 to Publications and News Service In-State

Travel. These funds are needed for the balance of

1964-65.



#252 $125 to Scholarship and Prizes Board to provide

funds for wages for balance of 1964-65.



#257 $1290 to Miscellaneous, N. O. C. to provide funds

to pay necessary expenses for selection of a

Librarian at Nevada Southern University.



#264 $815 to Office of Vice President-Finance to purchase

four used cash registers and one used calculator.



#265 $1500 to Miscellaneous N. O. C. to provide funds

for one appraisal of Nevada Southern University

land and closing costs on transfer of Bernard Joseph

property.



President Armstrong recommended approval of the following

transfers:



#248 $55 from Buildings and Grounds Out-of-State Travel

to Office of Vice President-Finance Out-of-State

Travel to provide funds needed in Accounting Office

to send two members of staff to conference in San

Francisco, California.



#249 $6500 from Nevada Industrial Commission Premiums

account to Contingency Reserve. This is the esti-

mated excess for fiscal 1964-65.



#250 $16,900 from Medical Insurance Premiums account to

Contingency Reserve. This is the estimated excess

for fiscal 1964-65.



#251 $3350 to Retirement Fund Premiums to provide funds

for balance of fiscal year 1964-65.



#256 $18,000 to Buildings and Grounds, Reno to accomplish

the following projects:



A. $6450 to install new lighting fixtures in the

College of Education Laboratory School.



B. $2000 to remodel rooms 105 and 204, Thompson

Eduction building to accommodate new faculty

authorized in 1965-66 budget.



C. $1900 to pave the area in front of the Physical

Plant building.



D. $750 to partition and remodel room 10, Home

Economics building for use as a laboratory by

Psychology Department.



E. $6900 to purchase a 15 passenger bus for the

Reno Campus motor pool (identical bus being

purchased for Nevada Southern University motor

pool).



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried unani-

mously that the above fund transfers be approved.



20. Approval of Check Registers



President Armstrong recommended the Check Registers, as

submitted by Mr. Humphrey, be approved.



Motion by Dr. White, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen, carried

unanimously by roll call vote that the Check Registers

be approved.



21. Resolution Concerning Radiological Health Facility, Nevada

Southern Campus



Upon motion by Mr. Hug, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen and unani-

mous vote, the following resolution was approved:



RESOLUTION NO. 65-12



Adopted by the Board of Regents, University

of Nevada at a meeting held June 11, 1965 at

the University of Nevada, Reno Campus



WHEREAS, the First National Bank of Nevada is the

designated trustee for Nevada Southern Science Build-

ing Revenue Certificates ($2,000,000 Radiological

Health Project):



NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED:



That the Board of Regents, University of Nevada hereby

instructs and authorizes the First National Bank of

Nevada to cremate paid coupons and bonds on the Nevada

Southern Science Building Revenue Certificates.



22. Bank Charges, Nevada Southern Science Building



President Armstrong stated that the First National Bank of

Nevada had previously been designated trustee for the Nevada

Southern Science Building (Radiological Health Project) by

the Board of Regents. It is now necessary to approve the

fee for purposes of the minutes. President Armstrong rec-

ommended approval of an acceptance fee of $1000 and an an-

nual fee of $400.



Motion by Mr. Davis, seconded by Mr. Grant, carried unani-

mously by roll call vote that the agreement, including the

fee, be approved.



23. Bid Openings



President Armstrong recommended approval of the bid open-

ing reports and the actions taken:



a) Paving of Areas East of Physical Plant Building, Reno

Campus



A meeting to open bids was held in Room 202, Morrill

Administration building, 2:15 P.M., Monday, June 7,

1965. Present were: Vice President-Finance Humphrey,

Assistant Engineer Whalen and one member of a bidding

firm. Bid notice had duly appeared in local papers

for: PAVING OF AREAS EAST OF PHYSICAL PLANT BUILDING,

UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO, NEVADA.



Mr. Humphrey opened the bids:



Robert L. Helms Construction Company

accompanied by bid bond $1500



Isbell Construction Company

accompanied by bid bond $2050



Nevada Paving

accompanied by bid bond $1535



It is recommended that the bid of Robert L. Helms

Construction Company in the amount of $1500 be accepted,

and that a contract be drawn to accomplish this work.

This bid is within the estimate prepared by the Univer-

sity Engineer's Office and funds are available in the

Seal and Chip Campus Streets Budget, Account No.

1-01-9009-39.



Respectfully submitted,



/s/ Brian J. Whalen

James D. Rogers

University Engineer



Approved:



/s/ Neil D. Humphrey /s/ Charles J. Armstrong

Vice President-Finance President



Voucher No. 90036



Motion by Mr. Ronzone, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried

unanimously by roll call vote that the bid of Robert

L. Helms Construction Co. be accepted and the contract

awarded.



b) Counter, Admissions Office, Reno Campus



A meeting to open bids was held in Room 202, Morrill

Administration building, 2 P.M., Monday, June 7, 1965.

Present were: Vice President-Finance Humphrey,

Assistant Engineer Whalen and one member of a bidding

firm. Bid notice had duly appeared in local papers

for: COUNTER, ADMISSIONS OFFICE, CLARK ADMINISTRATION

BUILDING, UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO, NEVADA.



Mr. Humphrey opened the bids:



Builders Mill

accompanied by bid bond $3670.85



Powell Cabinet & Fixture Co.

accompanied by Cashier's Check ($200) $3990.00



It is recommended that the bid of Builders Mill in the

amount of $3670.85 be accepted, and that a contract be

drawn to accomplish this work. This bid is in line

with the estimate prepared by the University Engineer's

Office and funds are available in the Miscellaneous

Carpentry Budget, Account No. 1-01-9004-39.



Respectfully submitted,



/s/ Brian J. Whalen

James D. Rogers

University Engineer



Approved:



/s/ Neil D. Humphrey /s/ Charles J. Armstrong

Vice President-Finance President



Voucher No. 90037



Motion by Mr. Hug, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen, carried

unanimously by roll call vote that the bid of Builders

Mill be accepted and the contract awarded.



c) Plantmix Overlay, Lower Campus Roadway, Reno Campus



A meeting to open bids was held in the office of the

Vice President-Finance, Morrill Administration, at 2

P.M., on Friday, April 22, 1965. Present were Vice

President Humphrey and Assistant University Engineer

Whalen. Bid notice had duly appeared in local papers

for: PLANTMIX OVERLAY, LOWER CAMPUS ROADWAY, UNIVER-

SITY OF NEVADA, RENO, NEVADA.



Bids were received and opened as follows:



Nevada Paving, Inc.

accompanied by bid bond $2374



Isbell Construction Co., Inc.

accompanied by bid bond $2500



Robert Helms Construction Co.

accompanied by bid bond $4800



It is recommended that the bid of Nevada Paving, Inc.,

in the amount of $2374 be accepted and that a contract

be drawn to accomplish this work. This bid is within

the estimate prepared by the University Engineer's

Office and funds are available in the Buildings and

Grounds, Reno, Repairs and Improvements Account No.

1-01-9010-39.



Respectfully submitted,



/s/ James D. Rogers

University Engineer



Approved:



/s/ Neil D. Humphrey /s/ Charles J. Armstrong

Vice President-Finance President



Voucher No. 90034



Motion by Mr. Davis, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried

unanimously by roll call vote that the bid of Nevada

Paving, Inc., be accepted and the contract awarded.



d) Refurbishing Lighting System at Educational Laboratory,

Reno Campus



A meeting to open bids was held in Room 202, Morrill

Hall, 2 P.M. Wednesday, June 9, 1965. Present were:

Vice President-Finance Humphrey, Assistant Engineer

Whalen and member of bidding firm. Bid notice had

duly appeared in local papers for: REFURBISHING

LIGHTING SYSTEM AT EDUCATION LABORATORY, UNIVERSITY

OF NEVADA, RENO, NEVADA.



Bids were received and opened by Mr. Humphrey as

follows:



Base Bid Alt 1 Alt 2

Acme-Collins Co., Inc.

accompanied by bid bond $2374 $1839 $779



A-C Electric Co.,

accompanied by Cashiers Check 6770 1044 797



Diamond Electric Co.

accompanied by bid bond 5200 1750 750



It is recommended that the bid of Diamond Electric, Inc.

in the amount of $5200 and Alternate #1 ($1750) and Al-

ternate #2 ($750) be accepted and that a contract be

drawn to accomplish this work. This bid is within the

estimate prepared by the University Engineer's Office

and funds are available in the Education Laboratory

School Account No. 1-01-9029-39.



Respectfully submitted,



/s/ Brian J. Whalen

James D. Rogers

University Engineer



Approved:



/s/ Neil D. Humphrey /s/ Charles J. Armstrong

Vice President-Finance President



Voucher No. 90038



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen,

carried unanimously by roll call vote that the bid

of Diamond Electric, Inc., be accepted and the contract

awarded.



24. Candidates for Degrees



President Armstrong recommended approval of the following

candidates for graduation as of June 12, 1965 from the Reno

Campus and as of June 14, 1965 from the Las Vegas Campus.

These candidates have been approved by the faculties con-

cerned and their records checked by the Registrar and the

Business Office.



RENO CAMPUS



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE



Burr, Charles Kenneth B. S.

Davis, James Barry B. S.

Etchamendy, Pete Robert B. S.

Johnston, Robert Uhel B. S.

Pomeroy, La Mar Deon B. S.

York, Charles R., Jr. B. S.



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCE



Aiazzi, Gail May B. A.

Avansino, Raymond Carl, Jr. B. A.

Beck, Donna Maria B. A.

Bergam, Roger Byron B. A.

Blaikie, John William B. S.

Branch, Karyn Sue B. A.

Bream, Carol Lynn B. S.

Broten, Arthur R. B. A.

Brown, James Joseph B. A.

Brown, Timothy Charles B. A.

Bruckner, Douglas John Olds B. A. in Journalism

Brunetto, Michael Arnold B. S.

Cahill, Carl Richard B. S.

Cassas, Richard B. S.

Charley, Evans B. A.

Coates, Ward W. B. S.

Cobb, Charles Houston B. S.

Corn, J. Gordon B. S.

Cornwall, William Leo B. A.

Dabney, Virginius B. A.

Davey, Darrell Lilburn B. S.

Doherty, Kathleen B. S.

Domina, Annette Louise B. A.

Douglass, Allen Walter B. S.

Dunning, Dolores Helen B. A.

Duty, John Michael B. S.

Edwards, H. Jay B. A.

Elliott, Eugene V. B. S. in Chemistry

Elliott, James E. B. A.

Elliott, Michelle Roberta B. A.

Enochson, Roy Wayne B. A.

Everett, David Francis B. S.

Farnesi, Dennis Bruce B. S.

Friedhoff, Ruth Ellen B. A.

Gibbs, Karen Stacy B. A.

Gomes, Lynn Goddard B. A.

Gomes, Stephen Laurence B. A.

Gratt, Renate Margarete B. A.

Grauvogel, Carl Albert, Jr. B. S.

Griffin, Michael R. B. A.

Gunter, Charles E. B. A.

Hackstaff, Donald Bennett B. A.

Haddad, Frederick A. B. A.

Hawkins, Martin James B. A.

Headley, Philip Clark B. S.

Helsdon, Kathleen Jerilyn B. A.

Henrikson, Duncan B. S.

Horgan, Thomas Edwin B. S.

Horn, Helen Georgiene B. A.

Jackson, Gregory Thomas B. S.

Jacky, William Bardwell B. S.

Jurs, Louis Delwin, III B. S.

Kleemann, Margaret Ellen B. A.

Koizumi, Carl J. B. S.

La Plante, Marilyn Skillicorn B. A. in Journalism

Lawson, Robert C. B. S.

Lee, Keith Lamar B. S.

Lewis, Patricia Alice B. A.

Lipparelli, Michael Arthur B. S.

Lituania, Rosemary Lucian B. S.

Loofbourrow, Philip Courtney, Jr. B. A.

Love, Gary Gene B. S.

Markarian, Vartan B. A.

Marlow, Joseph Lawrence B. S.

Mc Kinley, Janet Makin B. S.

Mitchell, Edwin A. B. A.

Morrison, Judith Ann B. A.

Munholand, Sherry Ann B. A.

Muth, Mary Theresa B. A.

Nelson, Gordon Leigh B. S. in Chemistry

Null, James Allen B. A.

Osborne, John Wesley B. A.

Otegui, Vienna Elaine B. A.

Owen, Joanne Gottschalk B. A.

Patridge, Virginia Coleman B. A.

Pickett, Michael Lee B. S.

Plath, Pamela Helen B. A.

Polkinghorne, Walter D. B. S.

Pozzi, Archie Bruce B. A. in Journalism

Reese, David Joyce B. A.

Remas, William Ace B. A.

Richards, Camille B. A.

Rivera, Lyle B. A.

Rowe, Eldred Lawrence B. A.

Rusk, Elizabeth Currier B. A.

Sabich, Mary Francis B. A.

Saden, Dawna Jean B. A.

Salter, Rondi Mattson B. A.

Sanders, Stephen Edward B. A.

Santini, Walter Clark Michael B. A.

Scott, John Green B. S.

Semenza, Lawrence John II B. A.

Shimotori, Gene Nobuyasu B. S.

Showalter, Diane Marilyn B. A.

Speth, Robert M. B. S. in Chemistry

Stegen, Nancy May B. A.

Street, Del Loomis B. A.

Strother, James Garland B. A.

Thompson, Jane Ellen B. A.

Tobey, Anita Christine B. A.

Toleno, Mary Julianna Alt B. A.

Tomlinson, Frank Raymond B. A.

Trigero, Kenneth Katon B. A.

Turner, Steven M. B. S.

Villanueva, Anthony John B. A.

Walen, Joanne Michele B. A.

Webster, Carolyn Barbara B. A.

White, Helen Stewart B. A.

White, Prudence Penny B. A.

Wright, Kenneth A. B. S.

Yeazel, Sharon Ann B. A.



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION



Archuleta, Fran P. B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Banta, Arline Marie B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Baratte, James J. B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Behm, Willard Paul B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Boyd, Gary Dean B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Burkham, Buck B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Cavanaugh, Coreen Sue B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Combs, Bradley Louis B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Craigmiles, Allan Lee B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Davis, Howard R. B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Fierce, John A. B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Fisher, Robert L. B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Fleischer, Barry Lewis B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Folgate, Kent Warren B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Gaylord, Noel Stephen B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Georgeson, Constantine James B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Hall, Thomas James B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Hicks, Larry Richard B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Jones, Thomas J. B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Keysar, Robert Jeffrey B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Loessberg, Virginia Ann B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Lundgren, Leon L. B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Mac Donald, Janet S. B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Mast, Clyde Marshall B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Mayer, Joseph W. B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Miles, Daniel George B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Nash, Russell S., Jr. B. A.

Neville, Stuart Eugene B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Nichols, Herbert Louis B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Palmer, William David B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Peek, George Frederick B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Powell, James Allen B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Ross, Thomas Alan B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Seifers, J. Douglas B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Skocki, Ronald John B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Stathes, Herbert Earle B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Thompson, Steven Earl B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Tremewan, A. Dolores B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Wellesley, Brian Timothy B. S. in Bus. Admin.



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION



Abalos, Robert Wayne B. S. in Ed.

Arthurs, Marva Furrow B. S. in Ed.

Atkinson, Edward Raleigh Moyes B. S. in Ed.

Baratte, Judy Ann B. A. in Ed.

Barrett, Margaret Jo B. S. in Ed.

Bianchi, Lois Ann B. S. in Ed.

Birch, Anna G. B. S. in Ed.

Borla, Catherine Landers B. A. in Ed.

Bowman, Judith White B. S. in Ed.

Carey, Mary Lee Hamilton B. S. in Ed.

Caroon, Marian Eddy B. S. in Ed.

Cheel, Jeanne Rae B. S. in Ed.

Ciarlantini, Angela Michele B. S. in Ed.

Corbin, Dorothy Kay B. S. in Ed.

Coyan, Linda Anne B. A. in Ed.

Dallas, Donald Martin B. S. in Ed.

Dore, Mary Janice B. A. in Ed.

Duck, E. Eugene B. S. in Ed.

Durant, Marcel Jacques B. A. in Ed.

Earnhart, Vincent M. B. A. in Ed.

Ede, Prella Mary B. A. in Ed.

Ensign, Patricia Lee B. S. in Ed.

Ferrier, Danette Maureen B. S. in Ed.

Foster, Diane K. B. A. in Ed.

Freemont, Curtis Loren B. S. in Ed.

Frost, Virginia Ann B. A. in Ed.

Goegg, Margaret A. B. S. in Ed.

Griffin, Cheryl Ann B. S. in Ed.

Gubler, Ida Jensen B. S. in Ed.

Hampton, David Mallory B. S. in Ed.

Hansen, Jeanette Rae B. S. in Ed.

Harcourt, Gail Hill B. S. in Ed.

Hardin, Barbara Joan B. S. in Ed.

Hart, Patrick Bernard B. S. in Ed.

Hillygus, Cojean Herrin B. S. in Ed.

Holland, Karen Andrea B. S. in Ed.

Holmes, Jo Ann Alice B. S. in Ed.

Horlacher, Joyce Ann B. S. in Ed.

Horner, Jean Marie Smith B. S. in Ed.

Horton, Diane A. B. S. in Ed.

Jackson, Nicholas De Lange B. A. in Ed.

Kess, Arthur Evan B. A. in Ed.

Kiley, Charles Curtis B. A. in Ed.

Killfoil, Molly May B. S. in Ed.

Leathers, Mary Frances Roberts B. S. in Ed.

Mac Gregor, Elizabeth Ann B. S. in Ed.

Mandas, Linda Zadow B. S. in Ed.

Martinez, Edward Worden, Jr. B. S. in Ed.

Mc Cabe, Mary Kathleen B. S. in Ed.

Mc Daniels, Alfred Flemming B. S. in Ed.

Mc Kinnon, Barry Donald B. S. in Ed.

Mc Sweeney, John Brian B. S. in Ed.

Meyer, Glenn Walter B. S. in Ed.

Montrose, Sharon Lynne B. S. in Ed.

Newmarker, Patricia A. Pringle B. S. in Ed.

Norcott, Judith Anne B. S. in Ed.

Olivas, Michael William B. S. in Ed.

Pagni, Jean Millicent B. A. in Ed.

Parker, Patricia Ann B. S. in Ed.

Peek, Nancy Marie Franklin B. A. in Ed.

Podoll, Ellen Anna B. S. in Ed.

Poole, Franklin Gray B. A. in Ed.

Raduziner, Mary Elizabeth B. S. in Ed.

Reich, Merry Jane B. A. in Ed.

Rhoades, Susan Jackie B. S. in Ed.

Roberts, Merle Lynn B. S. in Ed.

Rogers, George Wellington B. S. in Ed.

Rose, Ada M. B. S. in Ed.

Sanders, Bonnie H. B. S. in Ed.

Schebler, Robert James B. S. in Ed.

Schmidt, Judith Lynn B. S. in Ed.

Stanley, David Dhru B. S. in Ed.

Tucker, Peggy Quedell B. S. in Ed.

Vaughan, Adelle Luellen B. A. in Ed.

Walker, Judith Gayle B. S. in Ed.

Walters, Caroline S. B. S. in Ed.

Williams, Elizabeth Anne B. S. in Ed.

Wilson, Judith Irene B. S. in Ed.

Wilson, Rex Steven B. S. in Ed.

Zeigler, Julie Dee B. S. in Ed.



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING



Agee, Lance James B. S. in E. S.

Anderson, Gerald Leroy B. S. in C. E.

Bacigalupi, Gerald Lloyd B. S. in C. E.

Blakely, Michael David B. S. in C. E.

Carpener, Gerald Wayne B. S. in M. E.

Carver, William N. B. S. in E. E.

Douros, Thomas B. S. in M. E.

Estes, Warren Clough B. S. in M. E.

Felton, Robert Preston B. S. in E. E.

Fiore, Joseph Nicholas B. S. in M. E.

Fordham, John William B. S. in C. E.

Friberg, Carl E. B. S. in C. E.

Hanaway, Richard W. B. S. in M. E.

Hartman, Gary Franklin B. S. in E. E.

Heusser, Charles William B. S. in E. E.

Heward, Harlan Preston B. S. in E. E.

Hill, Alan Thomas B. S. in C. E.

Hrudicka, James Daniel B. S. in M. E.

Hunt, Dan Patrick B. S. in E. E.

Kitchen, Walter Robert B. S. in E. E.

Laughlin, Garry Eugene B. S. in C. E.

Lickley, William Carl B. S. in M. E.

Markwell, Tracy Stewart B. S. in C. E.

Mather, Stephen Leon B. S. in M. E.

Mc Cloud, Larence Hugh B. S. in E. E.

Peterson, Roger Lysle B. S. in E. E.

Reynolds, Roger Smith B. S. in E. S.

Romero, Cecil L. B. S. in E. E.

Samuels, Donald W. B. S. in M. E.

Short, David Alan B. S. in C. E.

Skeehan, Richard Neal B. S. in E. E.

Teglia, Robert J. B. S. in E. E.

Turner, David Michael B. S. in E. E.



SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS



Burr, Jacqueline Marie B. S. in H. Ec.

Cory, Jean Louise B. S. in H. Ec.

Handlin, Louise Eileen B. S. in H. Ec.

Heady, Alice June B. S. in H. Ec.

Jensen, Sharon B. S. in H. Ec.

Johnson, Diane Ellen B. S. in H. Ec.

Matley, Judith B. S. in H. Ec.

Mc Cay, Eddie Jo B. S. in H. Ec.

Mc Hughes, Diane Leona B. S. in H. Ec.

Nelson, Marjean Christine B. S. in H. Ec.

Rawlins, Leona Roberta Briggs B. S. in H. Ec.

Sterne, Margaret Laurene B. S. in H. Ec.



MACKAY SCHOOL OF MINES



Austin, Gregory G. B. S. in Min. E.

Cooper, Thomas Charles B. S. in Min. E.

Evans, Ronald R. B. S. in Min. E.

Mc Kinnon, Edwin Albert B. S. in Met. E.

Messier, Robert Arthur B. S. in Geol. E.

Owens, Steven S. B. S. in Geol. E.

Quade, Jack G. B. S. in Geol.

Raj, Prakash A. B. S. in Geol. E.

Wilson, Roland V., Jr. B. S. in Min. E.



SCHOOL OF NURSING



Bradbury, Karen Elizabeth B. S. in Nursing

Dinan, Patricia Lynne B. S. in Nursing

Gurneau, Jeanne Simone B. S. in Nursing

Metzker, Andree Jo B. S. in Nursing

Payne, Louise Shivers B. S. in Nursing

Seeliger, Kay Park B. S. in Nursing

Speckner, Marlies Charlotte B. S. in Nursing

Walker, Jill Katherine B. S. in Nursing



ADVANCED DEGREES



Alden, Frank Everet M. S.

Alpers, Fred Ernest M. S.

Baker, Allen Jessie M. S.

Bartholomew, David Clark M. S.

Beasley, Winfield Scott M. Ed.

Benton, Roger William M. S.

Berry, Edwin X. Ph. D.

Booth, G. Martin III M. S.

Bowen, Jimmie Keith M. A.

Brooks, Neil E. M. Ed.

Fabbi, Brent Peter M. S.

Frank, Jack D. M. S.

Friesen, Herbert N. M. S.

Glanzmann, Duane Allan M. Ed.

Holze, Dick H. Ph. D.

Holze, Marilynn Louise M. A.

Horn, Robert D. M. S.

Horner, Karl Forest M. A.

Hussey, Edward Walter Ph. D.

Jepsen, Robert M. Ed.

Johnson, Max Kirby M. Ed.

Kneller, Estermae Knight M. Ed.

Leach, Mary Faustine M. Ed.

Lee, Chiekyo M. S.

Lin, Hung-Yin M. S.

Lohr, Lewis Stillman M. S.

Lyons, Mark S. Geol. E.

Martin, Frederick Merlin M. S.

Mc Cready, Donald K. M. S.

Murdoch, Thomas S. M. Ed.

Nielsen, Klaus Th. Wiese M. S.

Orr, Robert John M. B. A.

Parker, Norman M. M. Ed.

Raine, Brian Dale M. B. A.

Raw, Jwood M. Ed.

Roberts, Ray E. M. B. A.

Rose, William Charles M. S.

Sandhu, Surjit Singh M. S.

Schweitzer, Don Alan M. A.

Short, Shelton Hardaway III M. A.

Smith, Edwin M. R. M. A.

Smith, Robert David M. S.

Thompson, Calvin E. M. S.

Trelease, Richard N. M. S.

Weyler, Paul A. M. S.



LAS VEGAS CAMPUS



DIVISION OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS



Bazar, Edward J., Jr. B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Dick, Jerald Michael B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Embry, Ted A. B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Mc Cullough, Tommie Michael B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Roberts, Jimmie Allen B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Schwerin, James Parker III B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Siems, William R. B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Steffens, Paul Bernard, Jr. B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Stern, Alberta Ernestine B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Tessler, Ada Lynn B. S. in Bus. Admin.

Whitaker, Ronald Charles B. S. in Bus. Admin.



DIVISION OF EDUCATION AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION



Hafen, Glenn Arlyn B. S. in Ed.

Bourland, Denise Husmann B. S. in Ed.

James, Audrey Ladner B. S. in Ed.

Laird, Mary B. B. S. in Ed.

Mongeot, Jacqueline B. A. in Ed.

Price, Annie B. B. S. in Ed.

Ray, I. Louise B. S. in Ed.

Rhude, Mary Louise B. S. in Ed.

Stevens, Eldine Randall B. S. in Ed.

Whitehead, Richard H. B. S. in Ed.



DIVISION OF HUMANITIES AND FINE ARTS



Hammill, Kathleen Broer B. A.

Metcalf, Bryan Royal B. A.

Schuyler, Lynn B. A.



DIVISION OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS



Austin, George T. B. S.

Baker, Lee Robert B. S.

Davis, Keith Edwin B. S.

Gilger, A. Duane B. S.

Mauer, Roger B. S.

Ochoa, Mary Ann B. S.

Tapper, Gary W. B. S.

Whann, Dennis Alan B. S.



DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES



Daley, William Hugh B. A.

Keller, Ronald W. B. A.

Kilen, Allan G. B. A.

Mlynarczyk, Carole B. A.



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried

unanimously that the candidates be approved and that

they be granted the indicated degrees and diplomas.



25. Resolution Assigning Stock Power



Upon motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mrs. Magee and

unanimous vote, the following resolution was adopted.



RESOLUTION NO. 65-11



Adopted by the Board of Regents, University of Nevada

at a meeting held June 11, 1965, at Reno, Nevada.



WHEREAS, the University of Nevada owns one (1) share

of common stock in the General Electric Company; and



WHEREAS, this stock was a gift from David K. Hartman,

Adah Drive, R. D. #1, Manilus, New York, for the

Library General Gifts Fund.



NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED:



That the Board of Regents, University of Nevada does

hereby authorize President Charles J. Armstrong to sell

the one (1) share of common stock in the General Elec-

tric Company, to sign the necessary stock power and to

deposit the proceeds of the sale in the Liberty General

Gifts Fund (1-51-4016).



26. University Council Proposal for Group Life Insurance



The University Council, at a meeting on May 13, approved

the following recommendation:



"That the group life insurance plan offered by the

Secruity Benefit Life Insurance Company, or some

similar plan, .... be forwarded to the President and

the Board of Regents with the recommendation that it

be approved for adoption as an option payroll deduc-

tion provision, for all University of Nevada faculty

and staff members who wish to participate."



Mr. Humphrey stated that: (1) the faculty committee and

their insurance advisor, Dean Weems, endorsed the group

plan offered by Security Benefit Life Insurance Company;

(2) the plan will be completely voluntary and may be con-

tinued at the same rates after leaving University of Nevada

employment, including retirement; and (3) there will be no

contribution by the University. Mr. Humphrey further stated

that the only administrative problem would be the mechanics

of withholding the premium from staff who wish to partici-

pate and the payroll office is prepared to do that if the

plan meets with the appproval of the Board of Regents.



Motion by Mr. Davis, seconded by Mr. Ronzone, carried

unanimously that the Board approve in principle the request

of the University Council by authorizing Mr. Humphrey's

office to make the necessary deductions, but specified

that the Regents were not endorsing any particular company.



27. The next regular meeting of the Board of Regents will be

June 24, 1965 on the Reno Campus.



The meeting adjourned at 2:30 P.M.



Fred M. Anderson, M. D.

Chairman



Bonnie M. Smotony

Secretary

06-11-1965