06/02/1988

UCCSN Board of Regents' Meeting Minutes
June 2-3, 1988








06-02-1988

Pages 57-100



BOARD OF REGENTS

UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA SYSTEM

June 2-3, 1988



The Board of Regents met on the above date in Rooms 201-202,

Donald Moyer Student Union, University of Nevada, Las Vegas.



Members present: Mrs. June F. Whitley, Chairman

Dr. James Eardley

Mr. Joseph M. Foley

Mrs. Dorothy S. Gallagher

Mr. Daniel J. Klaich

Mrs. Joan Kenney

Mrs. Jo Ann Sheerin

Mrs. Carolyn M. Sparks



Members absent: Mr. Chris Karamanos



Others present: Chancellor Mark H. Dawson

President William Berg, NNCC

President Anthony Calabro, WNCC

President Joseph Crowley, UNR

President John Gwaltney, TMCC

President Robert Maxson, UNLV

President Paul Meacham, CCCC

President James Taranik, DRI

Mr. Donald Klasic, General Counsel

Dr. Warren Fox, Vice Chancellor

Mr. Ron Sparks, Vice Chancellor

Ms. Mary Lou Moser, Secretary



Also present were Faculty Senate Chairs Cheryl Bowles (UNLV),

Patricia Crookham (NNCC), Gilbert Cochran (DRI), Beverly Funk

(CCCC), Paula Funkhouser (TMCC), Robert Mead (UNR), Dale Pugsley

(WNCC), Jim Williams (Unit), and Student Association Officers.



Chairman June Whitley called the meeting to order at 8:30 A.M. in

the Oasis Room, Donald Moyer Student Union, University of Nevada,

Las Vegas.



Chancellor Dawson reminded the Board that earlier this year it

had approved a new officer evaluation process wherein a ques-

tionnaire would be developed and mailed to several publics. Re-

plies would be tallied then reviewed by a committee composed of

two Presidents from institutions outside Nevada, a Regent and a

Chancellor.



The first President to undergo the evaluation was Dr. Joseph

Crowley, UNR. Questionnaires were sent to Administrators, Vice

Presidents, Deans, faculty, students, and alumni (all randomly

selected), all Regents and selected community leaders.



Immediately following the mailing of the questionnaires for Dr.

Crowley, a similar questionnaire was sent concerning President

Anthony Calabro at WNCC. It was determined by the committee that

the questionnaires were too cumbersome, contained questions which

could not be answered by most of those receiving them because

they were not in a position to be knowledgeable about the items

under consideration. A number of complaints were received, not

only from those who were selected, but from various faculty and

groups who felt the process in this respect was unfair to the

Officer.



Dr. Eardley, who served on the committee, stated he felt that the

Regents need to be more involved in the process. The two outside

representatives also recommended that the questionnaires not be

used in future evaluations but suggested that personal interviews

would be a more effective tool.



Chancellor Dawson stated that he felt the evaluation process

should be refined and would bring to the Board's August meeting a

revision to the policy for its consideration.



1. Personnel Session



Upon motion by Mrs. Sheerin, seconded by Mrs. Gallagher, the

Board moved to a closed personnel session for the purpose of

discussing the character, alleged misconduct, professional

competence or physical or mental health of a person in ac-

cordance with NRS 241.030.



The meeting recessed at 10:45 A.M. and reconvened at 1:40 P.M.

Thursday, June 2, 1988. All Regents were present except Mr.

Foley and Mr. Karamanos. Mr. Foley arrived later in the meeting.



2. Approved the Consent Agenda



Approved the Consent Agenda (identified as Ref. A, and filed

with the permanent minutes) containing the following:



(1) Approved the minutes of the regular meeting held April

7-8, 1988 and the special meeting held April 23, 1988.



(2) Approved the gifts, grants and contracts, listed in

Ref. C-1, filed with the permanent minutes.



(3) Approved the addition of the following person to the

DRI National Science Advisory Committee:



George M. Hidy, Palo Alto, California



(4) Approved a 2nd year of leave of absence without pay

for Professor Richard Turek of the Department of

Mathematical Sciences, UNLV.



(5) Approved the following interlocal agreements:



A. UNS Board of Regents/UNLV and Nevada Department of

Wildlife



Effective: July 1, 1988 to June 30, 1989

Amount : Not to exceed $18,000

Purpose : Student assistance with Bighorn Sheep

project.



B. UNS Board of Regents/UNR and Nevada Department of

Commerce, Real Estate Division



Effective: July 1, 1988 to June 30, 1989

Amount : Not to exceed $32,371

Purpose : Continuing education courses and

seminars to real estate licensees.



C. UNS Board of Regents/UNLV and Division of

Environmental Protection of the Department of

Conservation and Natural Resources



Effective: May 1, 1988 through January 31, 1989

Amount : Not to exceed $31,434

Purpose : UNLV to provide for routine limnologi-

cal monitoring of Lake Mead.



D. UNS Board of Regents/TMCC and State Department of

Human Resources, Health Division



Effective: July 1, 1988 through June 30, 1989

Amount : The Nevada State Division of Health to

provide (purchase) all expendable sup-

plies necessary to support clinic ex-

amination and treatment services to

eligible children.

Purpose : TMCC to provide screening, examination

and preventive dental services for

eligible children at its Dental As-

sisting Clinic at 7000 Dandini Blvd.,

Reno.



E. UNS Board of Regents/UNR and Nevada Department of

Wildlife



Effective: Upon approval through June 30, 1988

Amount : Addition of $9,800 to original contract

agreement of $10,000, making cost a

total of $19,800

Purpose : Contract Amendment for Program Assist-

ant II positions for Administrative

Services Division (License Office).



F. UNS Board of Regents/UNR and State Department of

Education



Effective: June 13-14, 1988, Methods & Materials

Class

June 15-16, 1988, Assessment &

Evaluation

June 20-21, 1988, Critical Thinking/

Learning

June 22-23, 1988, Second Language

Acquisition

Amount : $6,000

Purpose : Provide tuition waivers for maximum of

3 teachers taking 4 1-unit classes in

Winnemucca.



Mrs. Gallagher moved adoption of the Consent Agenda and ap-

proval with the authority to change the order of items as

specified throughout the meeting. Mrs. Kenney seconded.

Motion carried.



3. Approved the Appointment of Vice President of Business

Affairs, UNLV



Approved the appointment of Dr. Harry E. Neel, Jr. as Vice

President of Business Affairs at UNLV, at a salary of

$79,000, effective June 27, 1988.



Mrs. Sparks moved approval of the appointment of Dr. Harry

E. Neel, Jr. to the position of Vice President of Business

Affairs at UNLV, at a salary of $79,000, effective June 27,

1988. Mrs. Gallagher seconded. Motion carried.



4. Emergency Item: Approval of Interlocal Agreements



Chancellor Dawson requested approval to consider an emer-

gency item on the Consent Agenda to approve 2 interlocal

agreements. The emergency was that the agreements were to

take effect in June and July and the Board will not meet

again until August.



Mrs. Gallagher moved to accept an emergency item concerning

2 interlocal agreements. Mrs. Kenney seconded. Motion

carried.



Chancellor Dawson requested approval of the following

interlocal agreements:



G. UNS Board of Regents/TMCC and Nevada State Occupational

Information Coordinating Committee



Effective: July 1, 1988 through June 30, 1989

Amount : $1,500

Purpose : Use of Nevada Career Information System

by TMCC.



H. UNS Board of Regents/UNLV and Board of County

Commissioners of Clark County



Effective: June 1 through September 1, 1988

Amount : Not to exceed $9,900

Purpose : UNLV to provide for an assessment of needs

of incorporated areas for parks, open space,

recreation facilities and recreation pro-

grams.



Mrs. Gallagher moved approval of the interlocal agreements.

Mrs. Kenney seconded. Motion carried.



5. Chairman's Report



Chairman Whitley reported that the Board had directed the

Chancellor to provide a comprehensive report on the status

of minority recruitment, admission, and retention efforts

throughout UNS. Chancellor Dawson, in response, formed the

UNS Student Minority Outreach Task Force to examine the

concern in depth. This Task Force will be presenting a

report later in this agenda.



She reported that the Task Force has held numerous meetings

throughout the Spring, meeting with representatives of many

minority groups throughout Nevada, including: the Nevada

Indian Education Association, Reno-Sparks Indian Colony,

Western Shoshone National Council, Hispanic Educator's

Association, LULAC, the NAACP, Nevada Black Chamber of

Commerce, and the Las Vegas Alliance of Black School Educa-

tors. She, too, met with several representatives from

various minority groups.



The findings in the Task Force's report are significant.

She stated that the Board is strongly committed to affirma-

tive action.



6. Chancellor's Report



Chancellor Dawson reported that some 3,765 students applied

for graduation from the University of Nevada System's 2

Universities and 4 Community Colleges last month. While

official numbers are being compiled, at least 3,500 students

hold higher education degrees they didn't have one month

ago, and most will join the Nevada workforce. He stated

that the Commencement exercises held throughout the State

last month served as a welcome reminder that we are ful-

filling our most important assignment, helping students

succeed by improving the quality of their lives.



Chancellor Dawson presented an overview of numerous

financial matters on this agenda:



The 1989-91 professional salary request.

The 1989-93 capital improvement priority amendments.

Salary-related legislation to be sought from the 1989

Session of the Nevada State Legislature.

The 1988-89 UNS operating budget and pay raises for

Officers.

A UNLV salary model for professionals.

Policies governing salaries of Administrators who return

to the classroom.



The Chancellor asked President Crowley to provide the Board

with a status report on UNR's School of Home Economics.

President Crowley stated that the future of the School is

under study, that its continuation as a separate unit at

UNR may not be in the best interests of its students or the

School itself, and that any recommended changes in its

structure or rehousing of programs would be forwarded to

the Board of Regents within six months to a year.



Chairman Whitley relinquished the gavel to Vice Chairman

Gallagher.



7. Approved Salary Recommendations for 1989-91 UNS Budget

Request



Approved the salary recommendations of a 21% increase in

salaries for professional staff for the 1989-91 biennium.

biennium.



Vice Chancellor Sparks presented an overview of two 1988

national salary surveys of land grant Universities and

medium-sized Community Colleges. The Chancellor's Office,

the UNS Council of Presidents and the UNS Professional

Compensation Committee recommend a 21% increase in salaries

for professional staff in 1989-91. The recommendation

calls for seeking 11% in 1989-90, and a 10% increase in

1990-91.



During the 1985-87 biennium the Board of Regents adopted

3 national comparison groups by which to measure salaries

of UNS professionals, and began commissioning surveys to

monitor compensation trends in higher education. In addi-

tion, the Board adopted goals to achieve salary levels in

the top quartile of each national group in an effort to be

competitive in recruiting and retaining top-quality teachers

and researchers, and Administrators in the national market-

place.



UNR and UNLV faculty salaries are compared to those of 51

land grant and principal state Universities, one from each

state and two for Nevada. Community College instructors

are measured against medium-sized, comprehensive, urban Com-

munity Colleges throughout the U.S. And UNS administrative

positions are measured against counterparts reported in the

annual "Arkansas study" of salaries.



The newly released faculty studies show that two UNS insti-

tutions, UNR and CCCC, are the median institutions in the

1988 comparisons. Vice Chancellor Sparks stated that Uni-

versity salary increases in the top quartile of that compar-

ison group advanced at a higher rate than did Community Col-

lege salaries. If others throughout the U. S. receive pay

increases of 5% to 6% yearly over the next several years,

both UNS groups would have to receive nearly 21% to "arrive"

in the bottom of the Regents' top-quartile goal by 1991.



The study shows that in 1988 the top quartile University

faculty salary enjoys nationally is $42,487, while the

average for UNR and UNLV is $37,770. The average salary

paid instructors at Nevada's 4 Community Colleges is

$30,640, while the top quartile of their counterparts

nationally receive $35,300 this year.



The salary studies also consider cost-of-living and tax

factors. Vice Chancellor Sparks stated that the 1986 UNS

study showed an 8% difference between the cost of living in

Las Vegas and Reno, primarily attributed to higher housing

costs in Reno. The 1988 study shows a significant change,

with the gap narrowing to a 3% difference. Based upon

current purchasing power differences, the UNS study notes

it now costs 108.4% of the national average to live in

Reno/Sparks, and 105.4% of the national average to live in

Las Vegas. (In 1986, the figures were 110% and 102%,

respectively.)



Although all UNS professionals are ranked by "salary" levels

the studies show Nevada faculty would fare about 10% worse

in national "compensation" comparisons that include fringe

benefits such as employer-paid retirement, insurance, Social

Security and worker's compensation programs.



Chancellor Dawson stated that the UNS Compensation Committee

comprised of faculty representatives of all UNS institutions

and the Council of Presidents have recommended that the

Chancellor's Office prepare an analysis this Summer of the

financial impact of obtaining 100% employer-paid retirement.

UNS professionals are the only State employees not receiving

the benefit; the State pays half and the employee pays half

(nearly 10% of gross salary).



Chairman Whitley returned and resumed the gavel.



Mr. Foley entered the meeting at this time.



UNS Compensation Committee representative Gordon Gochnour of

CCCC reported that the Committee would like to consider the

option of seeking 100% employer-paid retirement in lieu of

10% of the total 21% pay increase sought for 1989-91. Other

Compensation Committee recommendations accepted by the Chan-

cellor and Presidents include:



Earmarking a maximum of 1% yearly for equity adjustments

on Campuses based upon plans developed at the Campus

level.



Seeking a Professional Development Fund of $500 per

full-time faculty member to cover expenses such as

professional dues, attendance at conferences, study to

maintain current skills and knowledge in one's field,

conducting and presenting research, and bringing in

consultants and experts. The request will be included

in the enhancement budget under "new programs".



Seeking two benefits counselors, one in Business Center

North and one in Business Center South, to assist facul-

ty with financial decisions such as retirement planning.



The Chancellor stated he would forward a request to the

Regents' Legislative Liaison Committee to seek legislation

increasing per diem rates for in-state and out-of-state

travel, and appeal to the State Board of Examiners to in-

crease Nevada's out-of-state travel budget formula to a

level reflecting current costs. Faculty representatives

said that while performance expectations have increased in

areas such as research, publication and consulting, the Tax

Reform Act of 1986 eliminated many write-offs associated

with business travel and other expenses, and institutions

do not have funds available to reimburse employees for

costs incurred.



Vice Chancellor Sparks, asked to estimate the cost for this

request of 11% in 1989-90, and 10% increase in 1990-91,

stated the cost would be approximately $25 million.



Mrs. Gallagher moved to accept the salary recommendations

for 1989-91 budget. Mrs. Sheerin seconded. Motion carried.



8. Report and Recommendations on Increasing Minority Student

Recruitment, Admissions and Retention



In response to a Board of Regents request at its October,

1987 meeting, Chancellor Mark Dawson formed the UNS Minority

Outreach Task Force to study minority student recruitment,

admission and retention within the University of Nevada Sys-

tem. This Task Force, Chaired by Karen Steinberg, Director

of Institutional Research, and composed of representatives

from each UNS Campus, met throughout the Spring Semester,

1988.



Task Force members have gathered and analyzed available data

concerning minority recruitment and retention within the

UNS, compiled information from other states and on the na-

tional level, and met with members of minority communities

in Washoe and Clark Counties to gather recommendations and

concerns. Ms. Steinberg presented the report which includes

the findings of the task force and their recommendations to

increase minority student recruitment, admissions and re-

tention within the System. The report, entitled "Preparing

to Win: Report of the UNS Student Minority Outreach Task

Force", is filed with the permanent minutes.



Ms. Steinberg stated that if Nevada is to have an adequate

work force in the next several decades, UNS Campuses must

step up efforts to recruit minorities and make sure they

successfully complete postsecondary education.



She stated the following statistics and demographic projec-

tions:



Nearly 1/4 of Nevada's school children are minority

today.

Minority higher education enrollment is significantly

less in proportion to the State's minority popu-

lation.

Between now and the year 2000 almost all new jobs will

be in high technology, information and service areas

rather than in production of goods. College-level

jobs will increase by 50%, and more than 50% for

College-trained technicians.

Nationally, 80% of the new workforce entrants will be

women, minorities and immigrants.

By the year 2020, 13 of the U. S. population will be

minority.



While minorities will play a significant role in the U. S.

and Nevada's work force, minorities are not successfully

completing College in the numbers essential to provide for

these manpower needs.



UNS Campuses need to do much more to recruit minorities and

retain them until their education is completed. These

findings, and a host of recommendations for improvements are

found in the report.



The Task Force calls for ongoing efforts to boost minority

participation, and ongoing monitoring to make sure recom-

mendations are being carried out on the Campuses.



The Task Force members have made the following recommenda-

tions to increase minority recruitment, admission, and

retention throughout the UNS:



A. A written policy endorsing and encouraging minority

student recruitment, admission and retention should be

adopted.



B. The Board of Regents and the institutional Presidents

should creatively seek resources for support of minority

recruitment and retention programs.



C. The UNS should establish a minority grants-in-aid

program.



D. The Board of Regents should direct each Campus President

to develop a plan for recruitment, admission, and re-

tention of minority students based on the findings of

this report.



E. The UNS Task Force on Student Minority Outreach should

continue to meet for the purpose of maintaining communi-

cation on this issue throughout the System and between

the System and minority communities in the State.



Ms. Steinberg introduced several Task Force members who were

in attendance.



Mr. Sam Davis, CCCC graduate, informed the Board of his past

experiences as a minority in Nevada higher education. He

emphasized the need for additional counselors, peer counse-

lors and minority counselors. He stated that he has served

as a peer counselor in the past at CCCC.



Mr. Ignacio Aviles, UNLV student and President of the UNLV

Hispanic student organization, informed the Board that he

too has served as a peer counselor in the Upward Bound Pro-

gram. He stated that the Hispanic population at UNLV con-

sisted of 6.4% student body; 4.5% classified staff; and 2.0%

professional. In considering these statistics there is an

indication for additional minority role models on Campus.



Mr. Richard Arnold, Executive Director of the Las Vegas In-

dian Center, stated that because he did not have a positive

higher education experience in Nevada, he attended Califor-

nia schools which possessed minority support systems. The

Indian people view life differently than the majority and

prefer relating to their own people. Mr. Foley questioned

why retention of Indian students is difficult and Mr. Arnold

answered that tribal customs are a higher priority than edu-

cation. Students may not realize the consequences of their

actions in leaving education; therefore, he emphasized the

need for minority role models on Campuses to aid in the

decision process.



Mr. Tom Rodriguez, Nevada Hispanics in Politics, stated that

the Task Force developed a good report, but felt that it

needed to address EEO in hiring additional role models;

funding and budgets; minority scholarship programs; and

additional support staff for activity groups.



Mr. Klaich moved to accept the report and recommendations of

the UNS Student Minority Outreach Task Force, requested that

the Task Force report periodically on the status of minori-

ties in the System. Further, Campuses are to report on

their accomplishments of the Task Force's recommendations

within the current calendar year, and that Presidents show

support by adhering to the report and recommendations. Mrs.

Sheerin seconded. Motion carried.



Chairman Whitley expressed her appreciation to Ms. Stein-

berg, the Task Force and community members for their input

in producing this excellent report and requested that each

Campus submit a budget for minority programs on its Campus.



9. Discussion of Nursing Issues in Nevada



State Senator Raymond Rawson, Chairman, Legislative Commit-

tee on Health Care, related that during the 1989 State Leg-

islative Session, one of the major issues will be that of

health care for the citizens of Nevada. On behalf of the

Committee, he stated that they were willing to support UNS

health related programs which would be presented to the

Legislature, and urged the System to give serious considera-

tion to expanding nursing programs in particular. It has

been determined that Nevada currently is short 1500 nurses.

The System graduated 90 this year. He also suggested that

it probably was time to change the funding ratio for these

programs in order to better educate the students. The Com-

mittee, he related, was anxious to work with the UNS Task

Force on Health Care.



Senator Rawson stated that there needs to be a great deal of

training for all health care providers in the State. There

is a need for certification and standardization throughout

the area. The Committee he Chairs will be making a number

of recommendations to the Legislature.



Among issues in this health care area are:



Senior health. There are 90,000 seniors in Nevada now and

that number is projected to double by 2000. For every 2,000

seniors it is estimated that another nursing home or long-

term care facility is needed. That would mean 45 additional

facilities and staffing will be needed in a very short time.



Subsidy programs for nurses. With a shortage of nurses all

across the country, very aggressive measures are needed for

recruitment purposes. Hospitals are addressing the issue

with paying fees for State exams, tuition reimbursements, a

$2,000 bonus, referral bonuses going to nurses who are able

to recruit nurses into the program, payment of student

loans, re-location expenses, improving working conditions,

12 weeks paid orientation program, travel subsidies, full

benefit packages including all insurance, retirement, vesti-

ture in 3 years, sick and annual leave, matched savings fund

programs, and flexible working hours.



In-service training in all health care areas.



Psychiatric services. There currently is only about 20% of

the staff that is needed just to meet basic standards. A

psychiatric residency program would allow Nevada to train

its own people and at the same time serve the patients.



Home health care issues, including the senior population.



Mrs. Janine Sawaya, Chairperson of the Nevada Commission for

Nursing and Associate Executive Director of Nursing at Sun-

rise Hospital, expressed her concerns about low nurse staff-

ing levels and urged the Board to increase budgets for Ne-

vada nursing programs by funding faculty and grants-in-aid

programs. The Las Vegas area hospitals have been providing

CCCC with adjunct nursing faculty for the last 2 years, but

will have to discontinue after this year because of the lack

of funding. Further, she urged funding from the System

specifically earmarked for these nursing programs.



The Community College Presidents expressed their concerns by

stating that if the Community Colleges are asked to increase

their nursing student/faculty ratio, it will require addi-

tional funding, classroom and clinical space and faculty,

including clinical faculty.



Mr. Fred Hillerby, Nevada Hospital Association spokesman,

commended the Chancellor's Office for its report concerning

Nevada nursing shortages, and also urged the Board to in-

crease budgets for Nevada nursing programs by funding facul-

ty and grants-in-aid programs. He stated that the Nevada

Hospital Association will aid in recruiting from Nevada high

schools and out-of-state agencies; will initiate a nursing

scholarship program; will continue lobbying efforts in sup-

porting UNS nursing budget; and will continue to improve

the work place and environment for nurses.



The meeting recessed and reconvened at 9:30 A.M. Friday, June 3,

1988 with all Regents present except Regent Karamanos.



10. Approved Professional Compensation and Increased Salary

Schedules for 3% Salary Trigger



A. Approved salaries for Administrators reporting to an

Officer, and professional staff whose salary will exceed

the salary schedule. All other professional salaries

are determined by the responsible officer. All perqui-

sites and terms are to continue at the approved level

except as indicated.



UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA SYSTEM

SALARY RECOMMENDATIONS



1987-88 1988-89 INCREASE

NAME SALARY SALARY $ %



UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, LAS VEGAS



Ackerman, R. 53,000 63,000** 10,000 18.8

Irsfeld, J. 60,397 64,625 4,228 7.0

Jacobs, J. 32,500 37,375* 4,875 12.0

Lujan, J. 41,906 44,001 2,095 5.0

Raschko, L. 45,170 47,429 2,259 5.0

Rivera, L. 75,626 82,425** 6,799 8.9

Rothermel, B. 69,287 72,751 3,464 5.0

Unrue, J. 78,398 89,250* 10,852 13.6



*Reflects a promotion

**Reflects an equity adjustment



UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA-RENO



Ault, C. 75,669 79,337*1 3,708 4.9

Brown, D. 85,000 89,165*2 4,165 4.9

Dhingra, A. 80,678 88,115*3 7,437 9.2

Gamble, S. 41,730 44,025* 2,295 5.5

Miltenberger, P. --- 76,500 --- ---

Page, P. 78,500 82,818** 4,318 5.5

Torris, D. 44,000 46,156* 2,156 4.9



*Three-year contract

**Employer-paid retirement

1*Salary includes stipend received for football coaching

responsibilities.

2*Dr. Brown proposed that, during his initial few years of

employment at UNR, he receive the equivalent in percent-

age terms of the average increase for Administrators.

3*Includes a $3000 supplement for additional responsibil-

ity as Administrator in charge of Lawlor Events Center

and the College Inn. Without supplement salary increase

would have been $4,437 or 5.5%.



DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE



Doherty, J. 44,076 46,280 2,204 5.0

Fenske, P. 84,180 86,705 2,525 3.0

Fox, C. 71,070 73,202 2,132 3.0

Pierson, W. 81,730 84,182 2,452 3.0

Schulke, D. 85,000 87,550 2,550 3.0

Tavernia, R. 31,500 33,075 1,575 5.0

Wagner, S. 50,124 52,630 2,506 5.0

Warburton, J. 84,180 86,705 2,525 3.0

Williams, C. 75,050 77,302 2,252 3.0

Winterberg, F. 66,168 69,476 3,308 5.0



CLARK COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE



Brown, T. 46,320 48,110 1,790 3.9

Fiant, R. 46,820 49,025 2,205 4.7

Gochnour, G. 45,805 47,579 1,774 3.9

Peebles, H. 55,500 57,965 2,465 4.4

Thomas-Sims, J. 54,560 56,997 2,437 4.5



NORTHERN NEVADA COMMUNITY COLLEGE



Aiazzi, S. 48,193 50,639 2,446 5.0

Greenhaw, C. 54,062 56,684 2,662 4.8

Karr, J. 47,669 50,099 2,430 5.1



TRUCKEE MEADOWS COMMUNITY COLLEGE



Claybrook, J. 39,278 41,456 2,178 5.5

Garner, K. 48,796 51,259 2,463 5.0

Gubanich, R. 58,505 61,500 2,995 5.1

Rainey, M. 47,025 49,435 2,410 5.1

Remington, R. 58,505 61,500 2,995 5.1



WESTERN NEVADA COMMUNITY COLLEGE



Davies, W. 52,355 57,425* 5,070 9.6

Dondero, M. 52,355 57,425* 5,070 9.6

Garmon, J. 52,355 57,425* 5,070 9.6



*Represents 3% increase plus a $3,500.00 merit and equity

adjustment.



UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA SYSTEM OFFICE



Berg, W. 73,400 77,100 3,700 5.0

Calabro, A. 73,400 77,100 3,700 5.0

Gwaltney, J. 73,400 77,100* 3,700 5.0

Meacham, P. 73,400 77,100* 3,700 5.0

Crowley, J. 117,600 123,500 5,900 5.0

Maxson, R. 117,600 123,500 5,900 5.0

Taranik, J. 100,000 105,000 5,000 5.0

Dawson, M. 102,000 107,100 5,100 5.0



Fox, W. 78,300 82,215 3,915 5.0

Klasic, D. 66,000 69,300 3,300 5.0

Moser, M. L. 50,000 52,500 2,500 5.0

Sparks, R. 78,300 82,215 3,915 5.0

Stetter, R. 49,440 51,912 2,128 5.0

Zitter, D. --- 69,500 --- ---



*It is proposed that the housing allowance be increased

$10,000/year



It was recommended that all Officers receive a 3-year

rolling contract.



All Officers receive a $6,000 auto/maintenance allowance

in lieu of reimbursement for use of a private vehicle on

official business for a 50-mile radius of incumbent's

office.



Mrs. Sheerin moved approval of salaries for Administra-

tors reporting to an Officer, and professional staff

whose salary will exceed the salary schedule. Mr.

Klaich seconded. Motion carried.



B. Approved the adjustment of all salary schedules within

the System to accommodate the 3% salary trigger for FY

1988-89 as provided by the State Legislative Appropri-

ation Act.



Mr. Klaich moved approval of adjustments of all salary

schedules within the System to accommodate the 3% trig-

ger for FY 1988-89. Dr. Eardley seconded. Motion

carried.



11. Approved the 1988-89 Operating Budget



Approved the 1988-89 Operating Budget and 3 UNR self-sup-

porting budgets (Lawlor Events Center, Chemistry Stores

and Public Information). The operating budget and self-

supporting budgets are filed in the Regents Office.



Vice Chancellor Sparks noted that Regents receive numerous

telephone calls and letters each year from high school

coaches, teachers, principals, superintendents and parents

wanting to know why a State building cannot be used for

their basketball tournaments and Commencements without a

fee. Presidents Maxson and Crowley indicated they have

similar requests from other State agencies. Regent Klaich

offered that the State should pay operating costs of State

buildings and the pavilions shouldn't be an exception.



Vice Chancellor Sparks presented the annual operating budget

of nearly $150 million for the next fiscal year, represent-

ing a 7.1% increase over 1987-88. The budget includes a 3%

across-the-board pay raise for professional faculty and a 2%

merit pool.



He reported that the budget included 89 new professional and

classified positions through UNS, of which 53 are earmarked

for UNLV and 8.6 for CCCC. Of the 26.6 new academic faculty

provided, 20 will be added at UNLV, a reflection of a boom

in student population growth in southern Nevada. Vice

Chancellor Sparks stated that UNS was budgeted for a 3.6%

increase in full-time students (FTE) enrollment this year,

while 7.7% more full-time students enrolled in UNS institu-

tions. Because all UNS Campuses except TMCC experienced en-

rollment growth at levels greater than budgeted, the result-

ing "gap" will be the first item addressed in the 1989-91

budget process.



Next year's operating budget also includes more than $3

million in estate fund monies for academic enhancements, and

increased student fees will generate $450,000 for UNLV and

more than $340,000 for UNR.



Vice Chancellor Sparks stated that of the total $150 million

budget, 81% is provided by State funds, 14% by student fees,

and the remainder from sources such as federal funds, the

estate fund, research grants, and gifts.



Mr. Klaich restated his concern about seeking State operat-

ing funds for the events centers at UNR and UNLV.



Mr. Klaich moved approval of the 1988-89 Operating Budget

and the 3 UNR self-supporting budgets. Mrs. Gallagher

seconded. Motion carried.



Mrs. Sheerin requested a report addressing the Lawlor Events

Center and Thomas and Mack Events Center operating funds and

the projections to be requested from the Nevada State

Legislature.



12. Presentation on Phase III, WNCC



President Calabro introduced Mr. Jay Wynkoop, architect,

Studio I, who discussed the plans for Phase III of the

Carson Campus of WNCC. Phase III will increase space by

1/3.



Mrs. Kenney moved approval of the plans for Phase III of the

Carson Campus of WMCC. Mrs. Gallagher seconded. Motion

carried.



13. Status Report, University of Nevada School of Medicine



President Crowley introduced Dean Robert Daugherty, School

of Medicine, who presented a status report. He stated that

92% of the students who have enrolled in Medical School

since 1971 are from Nevada, and that 140 graduates are prac-

ticing medicine throughout the State. The School recently

received 7-year full accreditation. Dr. Daugherty stated

that the School is delivering medical care to 3,000 medicaid

patients, resulting in a $2 million savings to the State.

He also stated that the School's Family Clinic in Las Vegas

needs more clinical teaching space and that the space needs

to be located near University Medical Center. He offered

that a building located kitty-corner to UMC would be ideal

if it could be afforded.



In response to a question from Dr. Eardley, Dr. Daugherty

informed the Board that all School of Medicine faculty

physicians practice medicine at the Veteran's Administration

or private offices.



Mr. Foley questioned how the School of Medicine feels about

Senator Rawson's suggestion of establishing a residency in

psychiatry, and Dr. Daugherty stated that Nevada does have

difficulty recruiting psychiatrists, but that this sugges-

tion should come from the State Health Institute. Not only

would the School of Medicine train psychiatrists, but a

variety of health service personnel as well.



President Meacham apprised the Board that classes will begin

in the West Charleston building on Monday, June 6, and the

Medical School Family Practice Clinic will open on July 5

with two family physicians and mini vans for transportation

of patients.



14. Approved Salary Model, UNLV



Approved the salary model for UNLV as contained in Ref. E,

filed in the Regents Office. This model has been recommend-

ed by the UNLV Faculty Senate. It is similar to a previous-

ly adopted UNR model and establishes minimum, medium and

maximum salary ranges based upon rank from instructors to

full professors.



Mrs. Gallagher moved approval of the UNLV salary model. Dr.

Eardley seconded. Motion carried.



15. Approved the 1989-93 Capital Improvement Program



Approved the revised 1989-93 Capital Improvement Program.

At the Council of Presidents meeting held May 19, 1988, the

Presidents re-evaluated the Capital Improvements Program to

be submitted to the 1989 Legislature. Vice Chancellor

Sparks presented the changes as contained in Ref. F, filed

with the permanent minutes.



Vice Chancellor Sparks informed the Board that in November

1987 two lists encompassing a 4-year period (1989-93) were

submitted to the Public Works Board. The list of mainte-

nance/remodel projects has been reduced from $20 million to

$10 million, and from 4 years to 2 years. The Board previ-

ously agreed to seek legislation to recover $5 million year-

ly that was redirected from higher education capital con-

struction (HECC Fund) projects to the State's General Fund

during Nevada's recession in 1983. Attempts by UNS to re-

cover the money in 1985 and 1987 were unsuccessful and re-

dedication of these funds is critical just to maintain ex-

isting facilities.



Nevada's Campuses are facing a crisis because lack of money

to renovate older buildings is resulting in a backlog of

deferred maintenance, while new facilities are needed --

particularly in southern Nevada -- to accommodate a burgeon-

ing student population.



The Board unanimously endorsed the proposed amendment in

1987 that would raise Nevada's bond limit from 1% to 2% of

the State's total assessed valuation. University officials

have vowed that calling attention to the public works cri-

sis will be high on the list of issues discussed with law-

makers in 1989.



Because maintenance needs compete with the need for new UNS

facilities, efforts to recover the HECC Fund of $5 million

yearly and to earmark the monies for maintenance, thus elim-

inating competition for new buildings was agreed upon by the

Regents and Presidents. Rather than submit a single list

of priorities last Fall to the Public Works Board for 1989-

93, UNS will submit two separate lists representative of the

two sets of needs.



The Capital Improvement Program has been reordered to allow

for Campus priorities.



Mrs. Sheerin suggested that the Capital Improvement Program

be submitted to the State Public Works Board as a package

instead of on a priority basis. Each Campus should get an

equal amount of monies for improvements.



Dr. Eardley moved approval of List #1, Maintenance and Re-

modeling Projects 1989-91. Mrs. Sparks seconded. Mrs.

Sheerin opposed. Motion carried.



Vice Chancellor Sparks reviewed List #2, New Construction

and Expansion Projects 1989-93, as amended May 19, 1988.



Mr. Foley moved approval of List #2, New Construction and

Expansion Projects 1989-93. Mrs. Gallagher seconded.

Motion carried.



16. Reports from Presidents on 1988-89 Goals



Each President distributed his 1988-89 institutional goals.



Truckee Meadows Community College - President Gwaltney an-

nounced the 1988-89 goals for TMCC:



1. TMCC will continue its efforts to secure external fund-

ing; however, the College will target smaller grants

that clearly define developmental areas. The Founda-

tion will conduct an on-going fundraising drive.



2. TMCC will continue to expand its services to business/

industry. Expansion will include customized, on-site,

contract courses and seminars (including Quick-Start

Programs) and general public workshops, seminars and

activities specifically designed for local businesses

and their employees.



3. TMCC will use Title III grant to expand its internal

management information systems. The expansion should

enable TMCC to have a better understanding of its costs

and resource allocations, student retention and enroll-

ment trends.



4. TMCC will use its Title III grant to expand recruiting

activities. In addition to transfer programs, the

College will emphasize recruiting students who can

benefit from its technical programs.



5. TMCC will use its Title III grant to evaluate its tech-

nical programs. TMCC will develop new technical pro-

grams when appropriate for the community. A major part

of this new programming will be cooperative education

involving internships and experiential training pro-

grams. TMCC will discontinue technical programs which

have been rendered obsolete in labor markets or those

impossible to perform due to technical advancement.



6. TMCC staff will become more active in community organ-

izations, projects and activities. The new Vice

Presidents will enlarge their community involvement.



7. TMCC will design and implement a structural staff

development model that will coordinate various staff

development programs and provide a communication net-

work among staff responsible for administration of such

activities.



8. TMCC will expand its relationship with public school

system through the continued use of the academic

olympics, career fairs, expanded programs in advanced

placement, vocational-technical training programs man-

aged in cooperation with the public schools and a more

active speakers' bureau.



9. TMCC will build a stronger relationship with government

agencies including the establishment of a law enforce-

ment center, fire fighters, trade and craft programs.



10. TMCC will promote the performing/fine arts through

student involvement in activities that will expose the

student to a wider breadth of educational experiences.

This will be accomplished through planned changes in

indoor theatre and establishment of an amphitheater.



11. TMCC will reinforce the student success philosophy on

Campus and in the community and enrich the Campus stu-

dent environment by increasing on-campus activities,

clubs and intramural sports for traditional and non-

traditional students by strengthening activities tar-

geted at retention of present students.



12. TMCC will improve its community public information pro-

gram by the employment of a director and provide more

general institutional support for publications and

public information.



13. TMCC will endeavor to obtain more instructional space.

Funds will be sought for facility acquisition or

construction. Leased space will be obtained in the

interim.



14. TMCC will expand its affirmative action efforts and

design student retention and recruiting programs for

minorities.



15. TMCC will continue to place a strong emphasis on artic-

ulation of curriculum and activities with the Washoe

County School District and the UNS institutions.



16. TMCC will continue to address the Northwest Association

of Accreditation recommendations in both written

responses and initiated activities to ensure future

accreditation.



Chairman Whitley requested that each goal of the Presidents

should be measurable and forwarded to the Board of Regents.



Chairman Whitley relinquished the gavel to Vice Chairman

Gallagher.



Western Nevada Community College - President Calabro an-

nounced the 1988-89 goals for WNCC:



1. Initiate organization and preparation of Self-Study III

for reaffirmation of institutional accreditation. The

self-study will be completed in late 1989 or early

1990. A deadline will be established by the Northwest

Association for Schools and Colleges in preparation for

an accreditation visit in early April of 1990. In ad-

dition, plans will be initiated to prepare for NLN ac-

creditation in response to consultant recommendations.



2. Develop College facilities. Additional facilities will

be requested from the Legislature to include a class-

room facility for the Fallon Campus and a Learning

Resources Center expansion for the Carson Campus. A

Master Plan for the development of both Campuses will

be completed. The construction of Phase III of the

Carson Campus should be near completion in the Fall of

1989. Within the scope of available resources, exist-

ing facilities will be renovated and upgraded.



3. Utilizing available resources, programs will be planned

and initiated to include a) an assessment program that

is designed to ensure student success by placing stu-

dents in courses and providing support services that

are appropriate for their abilities; b) definition of

student outcomes that are both qualitative and quanti-

tative; and c) a system to identify the high risk stu-

dents and to decrease the number of students who do not

complete courses in which they are enrolled.



4. Continue to implement a faculty development program

with new emphasis on future development of the College.



5. Organize appropriate College personnel and functions to

support the UNS Legislative Budget Request.



6. Within the scope of available resources, increase the

availability of courses and support services to rural

service areas including Douglas County and Lake Tahoe.



7. Expand the concept of business/industry partnerships to

include a broad range of community partnerships.



8. Continue review of College occupational programs that

will focus upon the addition of new needed programs and

the improvement of existing programs.



9. Continue to seek outside funding through writing pro-

posals for appropriate grants and contracts.



10. Continue private fund-raising efforts and develop long-

range fund-raising plan.



11. Seek and/or reallocate resources to conduct needed

institutional research.



12. Within the scope of available resources, continue to

improve academic and administrative computing capabil-

ity.



13. WNCC will increase awareness in the community through

expansion of current working relationships with high

schools and four-year institutions. Marketing efforts

will be expanded throughout the College service area.



14. WNCC will continue to plan, develop and seek resources

for an on-line registration system to be implemented as

soon as possible.



15. WNCC student environment will be enhanced through the

development of increased student activities and extra-

curricular programs and resources.



16. Development of the applications of instructional tech-

nology and telecommunications will be continued. This

includes expansion of the Local Area Network in new

College facilities. The use of televised courses will

be increased. Planning will be initiated to provide

video communication between the Carson Campus and the

Fallon Campus and other off-campus centers.



Northern Nevada Community College - President Berg announced

the 1988-89 goals for NNCC:



1. (Primary) Strive to see that all phases of operations

at NNCC are such as to assure a smooth transition with

with incoming President. (President Berg has announced

plans to retire in June, 1989.)



2. Initiate steps necessary to insure accreditation by the

National League of Nursing.



3. Complete plans for an adequate College owned or leased

facility in Winnemucca.



4. Initiate plans for a Technical Arts building and con-

tinue efforts of the Foundation to build a student

center.



5. Develop and implement an outreach and retention plan

for minority students.



6. Complete the development of a "career center" and have

it fully operational during the 1988-89 school year.



Mrs. Sheerin stated that since the county receives funds

from the State Net Proceeds from Mines Tax, it is her opin-

ion that some of those funds should go to help defray costs

of Community College programs for the mining industry.



Chairman Whitley returned and resumed the gavel.



Clark County Nevada Community College - President Meacham

announced the 1988-89 goals for CCCC:



1. Continue the College commitment to instructional excel-

lence as a cornerstone of the teaching/learning process

at CCCC by a) continuing efforts to maintain a balanced

and comprehensive curriculum of useful course offer-

ings; b) developing normative data to serve as the

basis for assumptions and recommendations regarding the

instructional program; c) continuing development of a

student advisement system that emphasizes early advise-

ment; and d) continuing to seek ways of rewarding and

encouraging faculty and students for accomplishments

and academic achievements.



2. Initiate the process of institutional introspection and

regeneration that will culminate in the accreditation

site visit that will occur in early 1990 by a) comple-

tion of Institution Master Plan; and b) development of

the institutional self-study document.



3. Development of the legislative action plan to place the

needs of CCCC within the budget parameters developed

for and by the UNS such as the base budget, additional

funding priorities, and capital improvements.



4. Continue to exert leadership efforts toward a systems

approach to higher education in Nevada by a) building

on accomplishments already affected regarding two-way

communication between the Chancellor's Office and CCCC;

b) continuing faculty exchange with UNLV; c) expanding

faculty exchange program to include other Community

Colleges; and d) persisting in efforts to create an

appropriate Systemwide staff development program.



5. Emphasize an institutional climate that would be sup-

portive of a commitment to affirmative action for fac-

ulty, staff and students by a) providing institutional

cooperation with the System-wide Minority Student

Retention Program; and b) continuing to keep before the

faculty and staff the need for active affirmative ac-

tion in employment and student life until that need no

longer exists.



6. Identify and secure resources to expand services pro-

vided students with special needs such as handicapped

students, senior citizens and development studies

students.



7. Establish a follow-up system to provide documentation

of student performance in University transfer and work

force occupants after attendance at CCCC. Continue to

promote the image of the College as an effective en-

vironment for educational and cultural activities by a)

expanding the College's involvement as a host site for

community based activities; and b) increasing the

awareness of business and industry CEO's to the variety

of options for education and training that CCCC could

make available to existing and future corporations in

southern Nevada.



Chairman Whitley relinquished the gavel to Vice Chairman

Gallagher.



Desert Research Institute - President Taranik announced the

1988-89 goals for DRI:



Mission Statement: To conduct research needed by the State

of Nevada of effective management of its natural resources

and for continued development and diversification of Ne-

vada's economy.



1. To continue to conduct programs of basic research to

improve fundamental scientific understanding needed

for effective management of Nevada's natural resources

including the State's air resources, land resources,

water resources and human resources.



2. To continue to conduct programs of applied research to

attract research and technology-based firms to Nevada

that will stimulate development of home-grown science

and technology-based firms, thereby promoting Statewide

expansion and diversification of Nevada's economy.



3. To expand the research capabilities of UNS by support-

ing the acquisition of major national and international

research programs throughout the System.



4. To promote effective cooperation between elements of

UNS to facilitate the conduct of Statewide programs of

basic and applied research.



5. Expand DRI's continuing direct support of graduate

student research and teaching on the academic Campuses

and increase DRI's support for continued development of

graduate programs throughout UNS.



6. To promote acquisition of nationally and international-

ly recognized outstanding faculty and student research-

ers throughout UNS while enhancing affirmative action

and equal opportunity goals.



7. To promote improved Statewide public understanding of

the importance of strong programs of basic and applied

research in UNS.



8. To promote improved national and international aware-

ness of excellence of research conducted throughout

UNS,



Chairman Whitley returned and resumed the gavel.



University of Nevada, Las Vegas



1. Uphold the authority and integrity of the President's

Office at UNLV with special emphasis upon institutional

control in all areas over which the University should

exercise authority and insure accountability.



2. Hold the confidence of the Regents, faculty, staff and

students in the President's ability to lead the

University.



3. Attract the best and brightest students from the State

of Nevada, including those from Community Colleges, and

continue to respond to the needs of minority students

with an increased emphasis on their recruitment.



4. Develop and expand the student services infrastructure

to provide better for all students, traditional and

non-traditional alike, even as we move to a more tradi-

tional residential Campus.



5. Enhance the physical plant, including beautification of

the Campus grounds.



6. Continue to work for construction and acquisition of

more instruction and laboratory space to meet the needs

of a rapidly expanding University.



7. Recruit and retain the best faculty scholars and staff,

as always paying attention to affirmative action guide-

lines in the hopes of attracting minorities.



8. Implement a salary model and a system for addressing

salary equity problems within the University, and con-

tinue to work toward increasing faculty salaries so

UNLV can be competitive in attracting and retaining

the best scholars and teachers available.



9. Continue to recognize the roles of the faculty and the

Faculty Senate in the shared governance of UNLV and to

provide a suitable space for the Faculty Senate to be

housed.



10. Enhance the academic reputation of UNLV through the

enhancement of continuing programs, and develop and

implement additional selective and appropriate programs

at the bachelor's, master's and doctoral levels.



11. Retain accreditation of all programs already accredited

and continue to make progress to earn accreditation for

all other academic programs that have appropriate

accreditation bodies.



12. Continue to assess and evaluate the administrative

structure as well as all programs on the UNLV Campus in

order to ensure the most effective use of resources.



13. Continue the support and development of the library to

meet the program and research needs of a doctoral Uni-

versity.



14. Provide essential fund raising for academic programs

for faculty and student development and to increase

sponsored research.



15. Ensure fiscal integrity, accountability, and ethical

standards in all programs and Departments within UNLV.



16. Develop more and closer cooperative efforts, including

academic articulation, between UNLV and all the other

Campuses in UNS, with special emphasis on UNR and CCCC.



17. Provide necessary assistance to our alumni and to the

formal alumni organization in order to strengthen their

role as an important support group for the University.



18. Enhance our cooperative relationships with public

schools and school districts, especially with an eye

toward easing the transition of high school students

under the new, more stringent academic requirements

of 1989.



19. Take a leading role in the economic development of the

State of Nevada.



20. Work effectively with the 1989 Legislature to ensure

appropriate funding to meet the growing educational

needs of the citizens of Nevada.



21. Enhance our academic reputation beyond the limits of

the State of Nevada in order to achieve regional and

national recognition, and, in so doing, enhance the

image of the State of Nevada.



22. Protect the fragile environment of the University so

that the unfettered search for new knowledge and for

trust can continue, regardless of where that search

may lead.



University of Nevada-Reno - President Crowley announced the

the 1988-89 goals for UNR:



1. Continue the work of building academic quality at the

University by planning for implementation of new core

curriculum and honors program, participation in the

development of higher admission standards, introducing

selected new programs and recruiting new faculty mem-

bers of outstanding reputation.



2. Continue and expand the effort to enhance the residence

halls and develop long range plans for the housing of

future students.



3. Continue and expand student recruitment and retention

activities and develop further scholarship resources

needed for these activities.



4. Provide substantial time, attention and organizational

effort to the task of assuring a successful Legislative

Session for UNS.



5. Develop further the growing capability and standing of

the University as a graduate and research institution.



6. Provide additional opportunities for faculty develop-

ment, including support for the strengthening of both

teaching and research.



7. Continue building strong government and community rela-

tions programs, with a particular emphasis on partner-

ships with the business community in the furtherance of

economic development objectives.



8. Provide for completion of a comprehensive and construc-

tive accreditation self-study and assure a successful

evaluation visit by the Northwest Association of

Schools and Colleges.



9. Continue to build a strong affirmative action and mi-

nority student recruitment capability.



10. Further enhance the effort to attract private funding

support through the Office of Development and UNR Foun-

dation and newly reorganized public outreach programs.



11. Continue the effort to assure fair treatment in faculty

compensation matters through further equity studies and

implementation of resultant recommendations.



12. Continue the work of Campus beautification and of long-

term planning for land acquisition.



13. Continue the development of strong international pro-

gramming and move toward reorganization of the Univer-

sity's international functions and offices.



14. Examine and implement where appropriate plans for aca-

demic reorganization.



15. Assure continuing cooperation with other institutions

within UNS and with the public schools of our State

and region.



Mrs. Gallagher stated that she felt the most important goal

which the President's have listed was System interaction.



17. Approved Promotion or Assignment to Rank



The following recommendations for promotion or assignment

to rank were forwarded for Board consideration.



A. University of Nevada-Reno - President Crowley recommend-

ed the following promotion, effective July 1, 1988:



Edward F. Wishart, to Professor of Mathematics



B. Desert Research Institute - President Taranik recommend-

ed the following promotions, effective July 1, 1988:



John L. Bowen, to Rank III, Energy and Environmental

Engineering Center

Dennis Ghiglieri, to Rank III, Water Resources Center



C. University of Nevada, Las Vegas - President Maxson rec-

ommended the following promotions, effective July 1,

1988:



Lynn Dryer, Associate Director, TeleMedia Services, to

Rank III

Jeffry Halverson, Registrar, to Rank IV

Jo Ann Jacobs to Assistant to the President

Michael P. Stowers, Executive Director, TeleMedia

Services, to Rank IV

John C. Unrue to Senior Vice President and Provost



Mr. Klaich moved approval of promotions or assignment to

rank as recommended by UNR, DRI and UNLV. Mr. Foley second-

ed. Motion carried.



18. Approved Award of Tenure



The following recommendations for tenure were forwarded for

Board consideration.



A. University of Nevada-Reno - President Crowley recommend-

ed award of tenure, effective July 1, 1988, to the fol-

lowing:



James N. Brune, Rank IV, Seismological Laboratory,

Mackay School of Mines

Nouha Salibi, Assistant Professor of Physics, College of

Arts and Science

Harrison H. Sheld, Associate Professor of Obstetrics and

Gynecology, School of Medicine



Mr. Klaich moved approval of award of tenure for UNR. Mr.

Foley seconded. Motion carried.



19. Approved Awarding of Emeritus Status, UNR



President Crowley recommended Emeritus Status for Rupert G.

Seals, Professor of Biochemistry, effective August 31, 1987.



Mr. Klaich moved approval of promotion to Emeritus Status

at UNR. Mr. Foley seconded. Motion carried.



Mrs. Kenney left the meeting at this time.



20. Report of Spring 1988 and Annualized 1987-88 Enrollment



Ms. Karen Steinberg, Director of Institutional Research,

presented Spring 1988 enrollment data and the annualized

System enrollment report for 1987-1988. See Ref. G, filed

in the Regents' Office.



Some 51,893 students were enrolled in UNS in Spring 1988, a

6% increase Statewide from Spring 1987. When viewed in

terms of the full-time equivalent (1 student per 15 credits)

UNS realized a full-time student population of 24,060 during

1987-88, up 7.7% from the previous academic year. Breakdown

by institution for 1987-88 FTE was:



UNR - 7,199 (up 3.6%)

UNLV - 8,500 (up 11.2%)

CCCC - 4,066 (up 11.2%)

NNCC - 500 (up 2.5%)

TMCC - 2,595 (up 3.3%)

WNCC - 1,199 (up 10.0%)



21. Approved the Establishment of a Student Government Organi-

zation, School of Medicine



Approved the establishment of a student government organiza-

tion for the students in the School of Medicine. Since the

M. D. program is technically not a graduate program and is

customarily classified as a professional program, its stu-

dents have been a part of ASUN. However, their interests

are distinctly different from those of undergraduate stu-

dents, much of their time is spent away from Campus, and

the services they need can be better supplied by having

their own student government organization.



Several discussions have been held during the last year on

this question. The ASUN has voted to allow the medical

students to separate and form their own student association.



A Constitution/Bylaws will be prepared and presented for

consideration by the Board, in the same manner as other

student government organizations.



President Crowley introduced Dr. Charles Rose, Special As-

sistant for Student Affairs, and Mr. Mark Doubrava, 3rd-year

medical student.



Mrs. Sparks moved approval of the establishment of a student

government organization for the School of Medicine. Mrs.

Gallagher seconded.



Dr. Eardley questioned whether or not the student represent-

ative would be attending Board of Regents' meetings, and

President Crowley stated that the representative would

probably attend when an issue was placed on the agenda which

concerned the organization.



Motion carried.



22. Approved System AIDS Guidelines



Approved System guidelines on Acquired Immune Deficiency

Syndrome (AIDS), as contained in Ref. H, filed with the

permanent minutes. These guidelines are designed to pro-

vide guidance for institutions in dealing with AIDS and

AIDS-related issues.



It was further recommended that each institution establish

specific policies relating to the disease of AIDS to include

increased awareness, and education to prevent further spread

of the disease.



Mrs. Gallagher moved approval of the System AIDS Guidelines.

Mr. Klaich seconded. Motion carried.



23. Approved Policy, Administrators Returning to Faculty Rank



Approved policies concerning the reassignment of Administra-

tors returning to faculty rank. These policies will become

effective July 1, 1988. The Faculty Senates on each Campus

have reviewed the policies.



(See Community Colleges, Ref. I, filed with the permanent

minutes.)



Dr. Eardley moved approval of the Community Colleges policy

concerning the reassignment of Administrators returning to

faculty rank. Mrs. Gallagher seconded. Motion carried.



(See UNR, Ref. J, filed with the permanent minutes.)



UNLV's policy will be brought before the Board at its August

meeting.



Dr. Eardley moved approval of the UNR policy concerning the

reassignment of Administrators returning to faculty rank.

Mrs. Gallagher seconded. Motion carried.



Chairman Whitley relinquished the gavel to Vice Chairman

Gallagher.



24. Approved Handbook Change, Foundation Guidelines



Approved Handbook changes, Title 4, Chapter 10, Section 9,

UNS and Member Institution Foundations Administrative and

Accounting Guidelines, as contained in Ref. K, filed in the

Regents Office.



These changes were requested by the Board as a result of the

annual audit procedures.



Dr. Eardley moved approval of the Handbook changes regarding

Foundation guidelines. Mrs. Sheerin seconded. Motion car-

ried.



25. Report and Recommendations of the Audit Committee



A report and recommendations of the Audit Committee meeting,

held June 3, 1988, were made by Regent Carolyn Sparks,

Chairman.



(1) Mr. John Surina of Deloitte, Haskins and Sells, UNS

independent auditing firm, reported on the June 30,

1987 UNR Financial Statements, filed in the Regents

Office.



(2) Mr. John Surina of Deloitte, Haskins and Sells, UNS

independent auditing firm, reported on the June 30,

1987 UNR Constructive Service Letter (Management

Letter), filed in the Regents Office.



(3) Mr. Bob Sellwood of Deloitte, Haskins and Sells, UNS

independent auditing firm, reported on the June 30,

1987 UNLV Financial Statements, filed in the Regents

Office.



(4) Mr. Bob Sellwood of Deloitte, Haskins and Sells, UNS

independent auditing firm, reported on the June 30,

1987 UNLV Constructive Service Letter (Management

Letter), filed in the Regents Office.



(5) Mr. John Surina of Deloitte, Haskins and Sells, UNS

independent auditing firm, reported on the June 30,

1987 DRI Financial Statements, filed in the Regents

Office.



(6) Mr. John Surina of Deloitte, Haskins and Sells, UNS

independent auditing firm, reported on the June 30,

1987 DRI Constructive Service Letter (Management

Letter), filed in the Regents Office.



(7) Mr. John Surina of Deloitte, Haskins and Sells, UNS

independent auditing firm, reported on the June 30,

1987 TMCC Financial Statements, filed in the Regents

Office.



(8) Mr. John Surina of Deloitte, Haskins and Sells, UNS

independent auditing firm, reported on the June 30,

1987 TMCC Constructive Service Letter (Management

Letter), filed in the Regents Office.



(9) Mr. John Surina of Deloitte, Haskins and Sells, UNS

independent auditing firm, reported on the June 30,

1987 CCCC Financial Statements, filed in the Regents

Office.



(10) Mr. John Surina of Deloitte, Haskins and Sells, UNS

independent auditing firm, reported on the June 30,

1987 CCCC Constructive Service Letter (Management

Letter), filed in the Regents Office.



(11) Mr. John Surina of Deloitte, Haskins and Sells, UNS

independent auditing firm, reported on the June 30,

1987 WNCC Financial Statements, filed in the Regents

Office.



(12) Mr. John Surina of Deloitte, Haskins and Sells, UNS

independent auditing firm, reported on the June 30,

1987 WNCC Constructive Service Letter (Management

Letter), filed in the Regents Office.



(13) Mr. John Surina of Deloitte, Haskins and Sells, UNS

independent auditing firm, reported on the June 30,

1987 NNCC Financial Statements, filed in the Regents

Office.



(14) Mr. John Surina of Deloitte, Haskins and Sells, UNS

independent auditing firm, reported on the June 30,

1987 NNCC Constructive Service Letter (Management

Letter), filed in the Regents Office.



Mr. Surina and Mr. Sellwood expressed their appreciation to

each of the Campus Controllers and their staff members for

assistance in completing the financial statements and con-

structive service letters.



(15) Internal Audit Director Sandi Cardinal presented the

audit of the UNLV Registrar and Accounts Receivable

Office, July 1, 1986 through December 31, 1987. The

audit report is filed in the Regents Office.



(16) Internal Audit Director Sandi Cardinal presented the

audit of the DRI Unused Annual Leave, July 1, 1986

through November 30, 1987. The audit report is filed

in the Regents Office.



(17) Internal Audit Director Sandi Cardinal presented the

audit of the DRI Indirect Cost Proposal, July 1, 1985

through June 30, 1986. The audit report is filed in

the Regents Office.



(18) Internal Audit Director Sandi Cardinal presented the

audit of the Associated Students of Truckee Meadows

Community College, July 1, 1986 through September 30,

1987. The audit report is filed in the Regents

Office.



(19) Internal Audit Director Sandi Cardinal presented the

audit of the WNCC United Students Association, July 1,

1986 through December 31, 1987. The audit report is

filed in the Regents Office.



(20) Information Only, Internal Audit Director Sandi Cardi-

nal presented the follow-up report on the Associated

Students of Clark County Community College audit. The

follow-up report is filed in the Regents Office.



Mrs. Sparks moved approval of the report and recommendations

of the Audit Committee. Mr. Klaich seconded. Motion car-

ried.



26. Report and Recommendations of the Budget and Finance

Committee



A report and recommendations of the Budget and Finance Com-

mittee meeting, held June 2, 1988, were made by Regent James

Eardley, Chairman.



(1) Approved Handbook changes, Title 4, Chapter 17, Section

8, Refund Policy. In the recently completed audit of

Continuing Education, Internal Audit recommended the

refund policy be expanded and clarified. The new pol-

icy will bring the continuing education refund policy

(both for academic extension and Summer Session class-

es) into close conformity with the policy pertaining

during the Fall and Spring.



Section 8. Refund Policy



3.f. Continuing Education



For continuing education and Summer Session academic

credit classes, a one hundred percent (100%) refund may

be authorized to students officially dropping a class

(es) or withdrawing from the University on or before

the date instruction begins for each class; a fifty

percent (50%) refund may be authorized to students of-

ficially dropping during the first twenty percent (20%)

of the scheduled class time; thereafter, no refund will

be made.



For non-credit classes and for academic credit classes

taught as part of a conference, institute, or intensive

course, the refund policy will be described in the

publicity material for the course and may vary from

course to course depending upon the circumstances.



(2) Approved Handbook changes, Title 4, Chapter 17, Section

17, Apartment Rentals, UNR. Rates were increased to

reflect the increase of 3.8% in the category of "Rents"

in the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for 1987.



Section 17. Apartment Rentals, UNR



2. Stead Campus Apartments



b. Apartments shall rent unfurnished, except stove

and refrigerator, as follows:



Student Effective July 1, 1988



1-bedroom $235 per month

2-bedroom $270 per month

Studio $ 85 per month



Employee Effective July 1, 1988



1-bedroom $305 per month

2-bedroom $340 per month

Studio $ 95 per month



Subsection 3 remains the same.



4. Other apartments and houses owned by the University

shall rent as follows:



Apartments Effective July 1, 1988

Monthly Rent



1262 N. Sierra Street $325

*1 & 5 Artemesia)

90 Twilight (5 plex) $315

120 E. 9th, Apt. A $390

120 E. 9th, Apt. B $250

120 E. 9th, Apt. C $315

120 E. 9th, Apt. D $305



Houses Effective July 1, 1988

Monthly Rent



1039 Evans Avenue $570

**1061 Evans Avenue

1065 Evans Avenue $505

1147 Evans Avenue $585

135 Anelli Lane $505

819-1/2 Center Street $325

819-1/2 Center Street (garage) $ 60

821 Center Street $525

*11 Artemesia Way



*Residence demolished to make parking lot.

**Residence converted to the Crisis Call Center.



(3) Approved Handbook changes, Title 4, Chapter 17, Section

15, Residence Hall and Food Service Rates, UNR, as

follows:



Remove College Inn from Title 4, Chapter 17, Section

15, Subsection 3, and add it to Title 4, Chapter 17,

in a new Section (Section 18) entitled "The College

Inn", Subsection 1.



Section 18. The College Inn



1. College Inn Student Rates

Effective 7/1/88

Per Semester

a. Room and Board



Single, 15-Meal Mon-Fri $ 1,500.00

Double, Reg. 15-Meal, Mon-Fri $ 1,420.00

Large, Dbl. 15-Meal, Mon-Fri $ 1,485.00

Double Suite, 15-Meal Mon-Fri $ 1,590.00



2. Conference Rates



Effective 1/1/88 Effective 1/1/88

Judges Groups Regular

a. Room Rates



Single $25.00 per day $30.00 per day

Double $25.00 per day $35.00 per day



b. Food Service



Breakfast $3.00

Lunch $4.95

Dinner $5.90

Steak Dinner $7.15



(4) Approved a $1.5 million improvement program for athlet-

ic facilities at UNR and to use up to $350,000, if re-

quired, from the Capital Improvement Fee Fund for the

project.



The Director of Athletics has raised $1,050,000 in

donor-provided facilities and funding for the project.

The University will provide up to $350,000 from the

Capital Improvement Fee Fund with the remaining

$100,000 to be raised by the Athletic Department.



Portions of the work will be completed or managed by

donor-designated contractors.



The program will include:



Restoration of the 400-meter Running

Track $200,000

Provide 3400 sq-ft of Athletic Faculty

Offices 300,000

Remodel Stadium Press Box 100,000

Provide additional 2500 seats at

north end of existing seating 200,000

Provide Restroom Facilities 150,000

Additional Locker Room Facilities 175,000

Peccole Field Spectator Facilities 75,000

Provide additional 2500 seats at

south end of existing seating 200,000

Improve concessions, entrance and

perimeter area 100,000



Mrs. Gallagher questioned whether or not problems could

arise if the Foundation received a gift and used it

before the gift was brought to the Board of Regents for

approval. In the past some gifts have been declined by

the Board and it was requested that the Council of

Presidents develop a policy to address this issue.



(5) Approved using Capital Improvement Fee Fund to repay a

parking improvement loan in the amount of $250,000.



At the October 18, 1985 meeting of the Board of Regents

approval was given to borrow $250,000 to grade, black-

top and light an area on the north end of the Campus

that would accommodate the parking of approximately

1050 vehicles. The additional parking was a city re-

quirement. Lawlor Events Center has been repaying the

loan but this is proving to be a burden on the finances

of that facility. The parking area is needed only by

patrons of Lawlor Events Center when there is a large

crowd, but is used on a daily basis by students, staff

and visitors to the Medical School facilities, the

System Computer Center and other entities of the UNR

Campus.



President Crowley stated that he will keep the Board

apprised of the Lawlor Events Center budget and finan-

cial problems.



Mr. Klaich felt that the time has come when the State

should provide funding for both events centers to

relieve them from being self-supporting. Many State

agencies request the use of the events centers, but

cannot afford the baseline operating costs. The high

schools are one example of requests to use the events

centers for basketball tournaments and Commencements.



(6) Approved Handbook changes, Title 4, Chapter 17, Section

13, Residence Hall and Food Service Rates, UNLV,as

follows:



Section 13. Residence Hall and Food Service Rates,

UNLV



Tonopah Hall

Room, Board and Phone $1,445.00 per semester

plus refundable damage

deposit 100.00 per semester



New Residence Halls

Room, Board and Phone $1,855.00 per semester

plus refundable damage

deposit 100.00 per semester





These changes will be effective Fall 1988.



(7) Approved using Capital Improvement Fee Fund in the

amount of $250,000 for landscaping around the new resi-

dence halls at UNLV.



Dr. Eardley moved approval of the report and recommendations

of the Budget and Finance Committee. Mrs. Sheerin seconded.

Motion carried.



27. Report and Recommendations of the Investment Committee



A report and recommendations of the Investment Committee

meeting, held June 2, 1988, were made by Regent Daniel

Klaich, Chairman.



(1) The Board of Regents at its April 27, 1988 meeting ap-

proved the investment of operating cash assets with

Sanford Bernstein & Co., Inc. using their intermediate

cash management services. Chancellor Dawson requested

that Sanford Bernstein & Co., Inc. be authorized by

agreement to use futures for this operating fund ac-

count in exactly the manner as approved on June 12,

1986 by the Board of Regents for the UNS Endowment

Fund Bond Account. The agreement will limit futures

trading to 25% of the account, and all futures will be

fully collateralized.



Mr. Klaich moved approval of the report and recommendations

of the Investment Committee. Mrs. Sparks seconded. Motion

carried.



28. Approved Lease, UNR



Approved a lease agreement with the State Department of

General Services for rent of assigned work area located in

Pahrump, Nevada at the Agriculture Experiment Station and

consisting of 110 square feet of office space and limited

storage in the northeast corner of the Holly Park Field

Laboratory "Shop/Equipment Area," with vehicle parking

nearby.



Mr. Klaich moved approval of the lease agreement with the

State Department of General Services. Mrs. Sparks second-

ed. Motion carried.



29. Approved Sale of Property, UNR



Approved the selling of 2-acre lot in the Meadow Valley

Ranchos Subdivision in Elko County. The property was donat-

ed by Elsie T. Cole in 1972, with no restrictions on the

sale of the property.



UNR has received an offer of $500 cash. A sale fee of 10%

is to be paid to Lipparelli and Associates of Elko.



The property is located several miles northeast of Elko and

has been on the market since 1980. The lot is over one-half

mile from power and telephone service, roads to the property

are not maintained and there's no Winter access. The buyers

understand there has been no recent survey of the property

and that they must satisfy themselves as to the exact

location. Any potential development of this property is

many years in the future.



Mr. Klaich moved approval of sale of UNR property in Elko.

Mrs. Sparks seconded. Motion carried.



30. Approved Easement, UNR



Approved an easement in the amount of $1 for Sierra Pacific

Power Company for overhead and underground electric distri-

bution on the UNR property located at the Southeast corner

of the University Substation Easement.



Mr. Klaich moved approval of an easement for Sierra Pacific

Power Company on UNR property. Mrs. Sparks seconded. Mo-

tion carried.



Chairman Whitley returned and resumed the gavel.



31. Approved Revision, Graduate Student Association Constitution

UNR



Approved the revised constitution for the UNR Graduate Stu-

dents Association as contained in Ref. L, filed in the Re-

gents Office.



President Crowley introduced GSA President Mr. Kirk Swanson

who reported that the document referred to in Article I,

Section 2 will be reviewed by General Counsel Klasic and

President Crowley as requested by them.



Mr. Klaich moved approval of the revised Constitution for

the UNR Graduate Students Association with Article I, Sec-

tion 2, Graduate Student Rights and Responsibilities docu-

ment to be reviewed by General Counsel Klasic and President

Crowley. Mrs. Gallagher seconded.



32. Approved Right of Way, CCCC



Approved a right of way grant to Nevada Power for land situ-

ated on Torrey Pines Drive near the Health Services Center,

CCCC.



Mr. Klaich moved approval of the CCCC right of way grant to

Nevada Power Company. Mrs. Sparks seconded. Motion car-

ried.



33. Approved Land Exchange, NNCC



Approved an exchange of land between the City of Elko and

NNCC consisting of 14 acres located north of the freeway

owned by NNCC for city-owned land adjacent to the Armory.



The NNCC Advisory Board and Elko City Council have reviewed

the exchange and recommend the exchange.



General Counsel Klasic will review documents prior to the

exchange.



Mr. Foley moved approval of the exchange of land between the

City of Elko and NNCC. Mrs. Sparks seconded. Mrs. Galla-

gher abstained due to a conflict of interest (Mike Gallagher

is Chairman of the Fair Board). Motion carried.



34. Approved Handbook Change, Regulations for Determining

Residency and Tuition Charges



Approved Handbook changes, Title 4, Chapter 15, Sections 2

and 3, Regulations for Determining Residency and Tuition

Charges. It is proposed that a person be a bona fide resi-

dent of the State of Nevada for at least 6 months to be

classified as an in-state student and that enrollment in

Community College service courses shall not affect this

residency. It is recommended that the following changes in

the Board of Regents' Handbook be adopted.



Section 2. Definitions



5. The term "date of matriculation" is the date of the

first day of instruction in the semester or term in

which enrollment first occurs, except that for a

student at the University of Nevada School of

Medicine, the "date of matriculation" shall be the

date that notice is sent that the student has been

admitted to the University of Nevada School of

Medicine. Enrollment in Community College community

service courses shall not be used in determining

"date of matriculation" for evaluation of residence.



Section 3. Tuition Charges



Tuition shall be charged to those persons classified

as out-of-state students registering for seven credits

or more in a given semester at any member institution

of the University of Nevada System; however, registra-

tion in Community College community service courses

which are not State funded, shall not cause tuition

to be assessed.



Mrs. Gallagher moved approval of the Handbook changes re-

garding regulations for determining residence and tuition

charges. Dr. Eardley seconded. Motion carried.



35. Update Report on Student Health Services, UNR



During the April 7, 1988 Board of Regents meeting, the Board

approved the concept of the School of Medicine to operate

the health services at UNR and requested a follow-up report

on the transition. President Crowley presented a report

stating that the transfer of responsibilities for student

health services to the School of Medicine has proceeded

smoothly. In order for the School of Medicine to provide

care with reduced cost savings for the student, decisions

have had to be made regarding duplicate staffing. Provi-

sions are in place for X-ray and laboratory services for

night and weekend physician coverage. Two full-time physi-

cians for day coverage and several specialists are in place.

The pharmacy is being expanded to encompass the new needs

resulting from the transfer and a plan for the expansion

for health education programs for students is in place in-

cluding computer health education. An advertising campaign

is being planned to publicize the availability of these

health services. An advisory committee, primarily a student

advisory committee, will be established.



36. New Business



As information only, Mrs. Sparks has been approached by the

UNLV Alumni Association which proposes that children of

degree-receiving alumni who reside outside the State of

Nevada be permitted to attend the alma mater of their par-

ents upon graduation from high school at a reduced rate of

$200.00 per semester out-of-state tuition. This policy

would be consistent with the "Good Neighbor Policy" already

approved by the Board. Mrs. Sparks would like this item

placed on the next Board of Regents agenda.



The meeting adjourned at 2:35 P.M.



Mary Lou Moser

Secretary of the Board

06-02-1988