03/27/1965

UCCSN Board of Regents' Meeting Minutes
March 27-28, 1965








03-27-1965

Pages 329-376



UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA

BOARD OF REGENTS

March 27, 1965



The Board of Regents met in the President's Office, Clark Ad-

ministration building, Reno Campus, on Saturday, March 27, 1965.

Present were Regents Anderson, Davis, Hug, Jacobsen, Magee,

Lombardi and Ronzone; President Armstrong, Vice President-Finance

Humphrey. Members of the Press were Mr. Laxalt and Mr. Dromiack,

Mrs. Glendon and Miss Miller.



The meeting was called to order by Chairman Anderson at 9:15 A.M.



1. Minutes of Previous Meeting



Motion by Mrs. Magee, seconded by Mr. Ronzone, carried

unanimously that the minutes of the previous meeting be

approved.



2. Report of the Educational Policies Committee Meeting on

March 19, 1965



In the absence of Dr. White, Chairman of the Educational

Policies Committee, President Armstrong presented the

minutes of the meeting as follows:



The Educational Policies Committee met in the Travis Lounge

of the Student Union on Friday, March 19, 1965. Present

were Regents Anderson, Davis, Hug, Jacobsen, Lombardi,

Magee and White; Deans Anderson, Kelly and Irwin, Dr. Guss,

Dr. Palola, Dr. Shirley and Professor Sandorf, and Presi-

dent Armstrong.



The meeting was called to order by Chairman White at 7:30

P.M.



1. Summer School, Nevada Southern



Mr. Humphrey attended the meeting for a portion of time

to discuss the 1965 Summer School at Nevada Southern.

President Armstrong explained the problem of implement-

ing the new improved salary schedule there because of

the fact that the program at Nevada Southern is not as

strong financially as is the Reno Summer School and

will not be able to adjust to the new schedule without

assistance.



Mr. Humphrey after reviewing the problem made the fol-

lowing suggestions of changes in Summer School budgets

and procedures:



1. The 1965 Reno Summer School budget has $18,578 in

the Contingency Reserve. I recommend that $17,175

of this be transferred to Summer School, Nevada

Southern (salaries). This would leave a Contin-

gency Reserve of only $1403, but the estimates of

revenue appear to be conservative and no extra-

ordinary difficulty should be encountered.



2. The 1965 Summer School, Nevada Southern budget

includes a Contingency Reserve of $3500. I recom-

mend that $2330 of this be transferred to salaries

and $1170 to operating. This reduces the Contin-

gency Reserve to zero; however, there should be no

problem as the unappropriated surplus January 1,

1965 was $3280 more than budgeted.



President Armstrong recommended that the Committee

recommend approval of the Board of these suggestions

for changes in Summer School budgets and procedures.



Motion by Mr. Davis, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen, carried

without dissenting vote, that the Committee recommend

to the Board that the changes in Summer School budgets

and procedures, as suggested by Mr. Humphrey, and

endorsed by President Armstrong, be approved.



2. Class A Action Which Would Require Special Students to

Meet the New Scholastic Regulations



President Armstrong reviewed for the Committee the con-

cern expressed by the Regents at their meeting on Febru-

ary 27, because of the large number of members of the

University faculty who voted against the Class A Action

which would require special students to meet the new

scholastic regulations. The final vote of the faculty

on this matter resulted in 193 approving and 123 not

approving, with 2 abstaining, out of a total of 522

ballots sent out to members of the faculty on both

Campuses. The results appear to reflect a strong dif-

ference of opinion among the faculty as to whether the

scholastic regulations should apply to special students.

At the request of the Board, President Armstrong invited

Dr. Cyrus Guss and Professor I. J. Sandorf to appear

before the Committee to discuss both the opponents' and

proponents' points of view concerning this matter.



Dr. Guss reviewed for the Committee the following back-

ground material:



"The question of whether or not the new scholastic

regulations shall apply to special students has been

under consideration for nearly a year. On February

20, 1964, the University Policy Committee on Aca-

demic Standards recommended the application of the

new regulations to returning special and regular

students as of June 1, 1964. During the April 16,

1964 meeting of the University Council the advis-

ability of applying the regulations to returning

special students was questioned; at the meeting of

May 21, 1964, the University Council voted to delay

action with respect to special students and to refer

the question to the Division Council of the Southern

Regional Division for study. When the University

Council convened on September 17, 1964, the matter

was assigned to the Committee on Academic Standards

for immediate attention. On October 15, 1964, the

Committee on Academic Standards recommended the

application of the new scholastic regulations to

returning special students, essentially the same

recommendation given to the Council in February.

A report from the Division Council of the Southern

Regional Division was also presented. The matter

was then referred for study jointly to the Commit-

tee on Academic Standards and the Scholastic Stand-

ing Committee at Las Vegas. Then, on December 17,

1964, the Committee on Academic Standards renewed

its recommendation, resulting in the Class A Action

now under consideration."



Dr. Guss continued by setting forth both the proponents'

and the opponents' views as presented to him as Chairman

of the University Council:



The Proponents' Views



"Those who favor the motion express the belief that

the special student ought to be held to the same

level of performance as any other student. 'All

(special) students shall be governed by the Uni-

versity regulations ...' and since the probation

and suspension rules are University regulations,

the returning special student is included.



"Ability, sound educational background, and moti-

vation are qualities desired in all students, and

the scholastic regulations are designed to sort out

those students who are patently so deficient in one

or more of these qualities that the educative proc-

esses leave no apparent significant impact on them.

To maintain that these deficient students are im-

mune to scholastic standards places undue weight

on the form and not the substance of an education.

The termination of these unpromising affiliations

helps preserve the integrity of the University in

its stand for academic excellence."



The Opponents' Views



"The present University philosophy toward special

students is to permit townspeople to attend courses

without reference to a degree or grade. The ap-

parent purpose of the proposed regulation is the

maintenance of the same minimum level of academic

achievement for both special and degree seeking

students. The regulation could, of course, have

no effect on the level of academic achievement for

special students completing only one course or for

those registering repeatedly but never completing

more than one course. For those who do complete

more than one course the existence of a given

'average' level of achievement constitutes no

guarantee of some minimum performance in a subse-

quent course especially when the courses are taken

at widely separated intervals and in widely dif-

ferent areas. Responsibility for maintenance of

standards rests with the Instructor at least as

surely as with an average record. Therefore, the

proposed regulation would either have no effect or

would fail in its intent to maintain standards and

would seem to be in opposition to the existing

philosophy toward the non-degree seeking student.

Finally, adoption of the proposed regulation would

remove the authority of Department and Dean over

admission of special students as provided in the

proposed catalog amendments, since the University

and any Departments thereof would seem to have no

choice but to admit any special students who were

not minus grade points."



Mr. Sandorf as a member of the Academic Standards Com-

mittee reviewed briefly his trip to Nevada Southern to

discuss with the NSU faculty the proposed action to

bring special students under the scholastic regulations.

He spoke of NSU's concern for the effect this regulation

would have on public relations. NSU is also concerned

over the additional manpower it would take to maintain

the necessary records if this regulation were instituted

on that Campus.



The enrollment and admissions procedures for special

students were discussed by the Committee with Dr.

Shirley. Dr. Shirley explained that a special student

does not apply for admission to the University - he asks

for and receives a registration package and proceeds

then to register in the class in which he is interested.

However, President Armstrong pointed out that controls

are imposed upon a special student by limiting the num-

ber of credit earned as a special student which may be

applied toward a degree.



To the question of how many special students might be

affected by this regulation to the extent that they

would be placed on probation, it was estimated by Dr.

Shirley that approximately 25 students on the Reno

Campus would be affected and Dr. White stated that NSU

had estimated that only 2% of their total of approxi-

mately 800 special students would be so affected. Dr.

Shirley further stated that the transition could be so

managed that no student would be immediately suspended

or placed on probation - rather, these students would

be given specified periods of time to eliminate their

deficiencies.



President Armstrong suggested that, in view of the

absence of any member of the NSU faculty at the dis-

cussion, perhaps the Committee would prefer to table

the discussion until such time as representatives of

the NSU faculty might be invited to attend a meeting.



Motion by Mr. Davis, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen, carried

with no dissenting vote, that this proposed Class A

Action be tabled until the May 7 meeting in Las Vegas,

at which time a meeting of the Educational Policies

Committee could be held and representatives of the NSU

faculty could be asked to appear before the Committee.



3. Effect of New Scholastic Regulations on All Students

of the University



President Armstrong reviewed the discussion at the

February 27 meeting of the Board when some concern was

expressed over the relatively large number of students

placed on probation or suspended at the end of the

first semester of the current academic year, even

though the percentage of students falling below a 2.0

average is not significantly larger than in the past.

To provide the Committee with as much information as

possible, President Armstrong had invited Dean Irwin,

Dr. Guss, Dr. Shirley and Dr. Palola to appear before

the Committee to discuss the matter.



Dr. Shirley presented the following summary of the aca-

demic records of undergraduates for the Fall semesters

1961-64, Reno Campus:



1961 1962

Number and Percentage # % # %

------------ ------------



Undergraduate Enrollment 2619 2693

Placed on Probation 169 6.5 225 8.4

Continued on Probation 116 4.4 120 4.5

Suspended 142 5.4 111 4.1

Disqualified 25 1.0 28 1.0



Total 452 17.3 484 18.0



1963 1964

Number and Percentage # % # %

------------ ------------



Undergraduate Enrollment 2861 3159

Placed on Probation 276 9.7 410 13.0

Continued on Probation 272 9.5 503 16.0

Suspended 188 6.6 234 7.4

Disqualified 29 1.0 2 .06



Total 765 26.8 1149 36.4



Note: A study at the close of the Fall semester 1961

showed that 35.6% of the 2619 undergraduates

had less than a "C" average.



As additional information, Dean Irwin presented some

interpretation of the figures presented by Dr. Shirley.

He continued the discussion by presenting statistics

gathered from other Western Colleges comparing their

scholastic regulations as related to the probation and

suspension of students to those of the University of

Nevada.



Dr. Palola brought to the attention of the Committee a

study recently proposed by the Academic Standards Com-

mittee of the University Council regarding unclassified

on-probation students who will begin study for the Fall

semester, 1965. The study would provide information on

the following:



1. What is the status of these students at the end

of each semester during the four years?



a. Number and percentage who earned a "C"

average or better.

b. Number and percentage on probation.

c. Number and percentage suspended.

d. Number and percentage who withdrew.

e. Number and percentage who obtained classi-

fied status.



2. After 4 years, what percentage of the total

group graduated?



a. Number and percentage who were classified

as Seniors.



3. Is there a significant difference in the

achievement of the following three groups ad-

mitted as unclassified on probation?



a. Those who had an overall "C" average or

above in high school.

b. Those who had a "C" average or above in

academic subjects in high school.

c. Those who had less than an overall "C"

average in high school, but whose ACT

scores (or subsequent post-high school

work) qualified them for admission.



Dr. Guss added a final statement to the discussion by

saying that he had recently polled the members of the

University Council as to their attitude toward the new

scholastic regulations, and he reported that a large

majority of the Council approved the new standards.



Motion by Mr. Davis, seconded by Mrs. Magee, carried

without dissenting vote, that the Committee, as a result

of the review, report to the Board that the Educational

Policies Committee believes the new scholastic regula-

tions are a definite improvement in the total academic

program of the University of Nevada.



4. University Sponsored Programs: Practices Regarding

Credits and Grades



President Armstrong reviewed the reasons behind the

need for a discussion by the Committee of the current

policy of treating as transfer credit work done in

programs sponsored by the University of Nevada, such

as in medical technology, which are taught by local

physicians and credited toward a degree at the Univer-

sity of Nevada. The question arises as to the justi-

fication for treating such work as transfer credit in

view of the fact that the University of Nevada sponsors

the programs. Dr. Shirley had been invited by President

Armstrong to discuss with the Committee these University

sponsored programs and submitted for information the

following report:



There are two different types of sponsored programs

currently in operation at the University:



I. Those programs which receive full recognition

of the credits and grades earned in courses

taught in off-Campus laboratory facilities.

Two basic standards are satisfied:



1) They are composed of individually specified

courses which have been officially approved

by the University and are listed in the

catalog.



2) The courses are taught by, or are under the

direct supervision of, a regular University

faculty member who determines and issues

the final grades.



Note: Student teaching and Nursing Training

are examples of Type I programs.



II. Those programs which result in a blanket grant

of credit based upon the receipt of the required

certification showing completion. Grades may,

or may not, be involved. The medical technology

program is a direct example of this type and the

following is presented for clarification.



In reviewing the earlier catalogs, the 1944-45

edition contains the first reference to the

current program. In general, the regulations

remained unchanged through the 1961-62 edition,

and it is the most recent issue to state the

regulations in detail. (p. 140)



"A student completing the 3-year medical

technologist course may be granted a Bach-

elor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree

from the University of Nevada when he or

she has, in addition, completed the 12 to

18 months technologists training course,

has received a certificate or diploma from

the laboratory where the training was taken,

and has passed the national registry exam-

ination of the American Society of Clinical

Pathologists. A testimonial similar to

that described under the premedical course

may be presented from the Director of the

Medical Technology School. The only type

of laboratory training acceptable will be

that obtained from a Medical Technology

School approved by the Council of Medical

Education and Hospitals of the American

Medical Association. The laboratories at

St. Mary's Hospital and Washoe General

Hospital in Reno are approved for the train-

ing of clinical laboratory technicians."



From these regulations, it is apparent the med-

ical technology program does not meet the stand-

ards which are satisfied by Type I programs.

The University does not actually sponsor the

individual hospital laboratories or their staff;

it merely recognizes the official certification

for the completion of the 4th year of work for

a Bachelors degree by granting 32 unspecified

credits as no individual courses are listed.

A grade may, or may not, be received depending

upon the individual physician in charge. Since

the University has no direct supervision or

control over a grade which is issued by a non-

University person, the grade is not considered

comparable to a grade that is issued by a Uni-

versity faculty member for the completion of a

regular catalog course. Such practice would be

questionable from an accreditation point-of-

view.



Conclusion:



It is suggested the College and Department

which the medical technology program is assigned

be requested to evaluate the present program and

make appropriate recommendations concerning any

desired academic changes. If the credits and

grades are to be fully recognized as regular

courses completed at the University, it would

seem essential that the two basic standards cur-

rently being met by the Type I programs should

be satisfied.



Following the discussion, President Armstrong recommend-

ed Dr. Shirley's stated conclusion become the basis of

the Committee's recommendation to the Board.



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Dr. Lombardi, car-

ried without dissenting vote, that the conclusion as

stated in Dr. Shirley's report concerning University

sponsored programs be recommended to the Board for

adoption.



5. Proposed Associate Degree Programs



President Armstrong reviewed for the Committee the

proposed Associate Degree programs, indicating that

the programs had been reviewed and approved by the

University and Academic Councils. He also acquainted

the Committee with the Faculty Policy Bulletins (#65-2

and #65-3) which contain the established guidelines for

Associate Degree programs.



Deans Anderson and Kelly provided detailed information

concerning the nature of the programs.



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mrs. Magee, carried

without dissenting vote that the Committee recommend to

the Board the approval of the Associate Degree programs,

including the policy guidelines set forth in Faculty

Policy Bulletins #65-2 and #65-3 as well as the specific

curricula for Electronic Technology, Drafting Technology

and Nursing.



6. Proposed Art Major at Nevada Southern



President Armstrong reviewed for the Committee the pre-

vious action of the Academic Council in approving the

proposed baccalaureate program in Art for Nevada South-

ern, as submitted by Dean Carlson, but pointed out that

the Academic Council, in approving the program, had

stipulated that no more than 30 credits in Art be re-

quired.



Motion by Mrs. Magee, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen, carried

with no dissenting vote, that the proposed Art major

for Nevada Southern as described be recommended to the

Board for approval.



The meeting adjourned at 10:30 P.M.



Action of the Board:



Item #1 Motion by Mrs. Magee, seconded by Mr. Davis, car-

ried unanimously that the recommendation of the

Committee be approved by the Board.



Item #2 Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Hug, car-

ried unanimously that the Board endorse the action

of the Committee in its proposal to table discus-

sion on the proposed Class A Action until the May

7 meeting of the Educational Policies Committee.



Item #3 Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Ronzone,

carried unanimously that the Board receive the

report of the Committee.



Item #4 Motion by Mr. Hug, seconded by Mr. Davis, carried

unanimously that the recommendation of the Com-

mittee be approved by the Board.



Item #5 Motion by Mr. Davis, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen,

carried unanimously that the recommendation of

the Committee be approved by the Board.



Item #6 Motion by Mrs. Magee, seconded by Mr. Ronzone,

carried unanimously that the recommendation of

the Committee be approved by the Board.



3. Report of Legislative Committee Meeting of March 26



President Armstrong presented to the Board the minutes of

the Legislative Committee meeting as follows:



The Legislative Committee met during luncheon in the Hardy

Room of the Student Union on March 26, 1965. Present were

Regents Anderson, David, Hug, Jacobsen, Magee and Ronzone;

President Armstrong and Vice President-Finance Humphrey.



The Committee discussed a report from Mr. Humphrey on the

current status of the University's legislative program.



President Armstrong presented to the Committee the follow-

ing letter and recommendation from Mr. Humphrey concerning

the Higher Education Facilities Act of 1963:



"As you know, Title I of this act makes available to

Nevada $268,820 per year for three years or a total of

$806,460 for undergraduate facilities. The Legislature

is anticipating University use of $529,500 of this for

the NSU Library addition, leaving uncommitted $276,960

for use in 1967.



"Also in Title I there is provided $53,792 per year

($161,376 3-year total) for 'Public Community Colleges

and Public Technical Institutes'. This money is not

now useable by either South Dakota or Nevada due to

the absence of the institutions named.



"HR 4887 by Rep. Reifil, HR 2946 by Rep. Berry and S

1048 by Senator Mc Govern (all of South Dakota) all

provide that the Title I allocation for public commu-

nity colleges and public technical institutes will be

available for undergraduate institutions in a state

which does not have the former institutions.



"If this legislation were to pass a total of $438,336

(i. e., $276,960 plus $161,376 from present Title I

appropriations, plus whatever we could secure by appli-

cation from Title II (graduate facilities), plus pos-

sible new Title I) annual entitlements would be avail-

able in 1967 for matching State monies on the Physical

Science project.



"I recommend that the Board of Regents authorize a

request to Senator's Bible and Cannon and Representa-

tive Baring to support this legislation. If a tech-

nical institute is established or on the drawing

boards by 1967 the money would be available for that

purpose."



President Armstrong endorsed Mr. Humphrey's recommendation

and the Committee agreed by consensus to recommend that the

Board authorize the Administration to request support of

the Legislation as outlined in the above letter.



President Armstrong read to the Committee the following

resolution which was approved by the Executive Committee

of the Alumni Association and sent to each member of the

Legislature:



"Meeting Monday evening, March 22nd, the Executive

Committee of the University of Nevada Alumni Associa-

tion, which is an elected committee of the Association

to represent the Association at all times, passed the

following resolution without dissenting vote:



'Be It Resolved, that the Executive Committee of

the University of Nevada Alumni Association stands

one hundred percent behind President Charles J.

Armstrong and the Board of Regents of the Univer-

sity of Nevada in seeking adequate state appropri-

ated funds for maintaining and developing the pro-

grams of education at the University.'



"The Committee sincerely solicits your support and back-

ing of budget requests for the University of Nevada."



/s/ William C. Thornton

President

Alumni Association



The meeting adjourned at 1:20 P.M.



Action of the Board:



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Davis, carried

unanimously that the Board accept the minutes of the

Legislative Committee as submitted.



4. Report of Administrative and Personnel Committee Meeting

of March 26



Mrs. Magee presented the minutes of the Administrative and

Personnel Committee meeting, as follows:



The Administrative and Personnel Committee met in the Travis

Lounge of the Student Union on March 26, 1965. Present were

Regents Anderson, Davis, Hug, Jacobsen, Magee and Ronzone;

President Armstrong and Vice President-Finance Humphrey.

(Regent Lombardi entered the meeting at 2:15 P.M.)



The meeting was called to order by Chairman Magee at 1:25

P.M.



President Armstrong reviewed for the Committee an earlier

request by the Board that a policy statement be prepared

for Desert Research Institute, covering certain finiancial

and personnel aspects of their operation. A proposed

statement, prepared by Mr. Humphrey and Mr. Orlen, was

distributed. Suggested alternatives to the proposed state-

ment were also presented by Mr. Humphrey concerning Items

B.6 and B.7 which cover procedures to be followed for

travel by DRI personnel and when making purchases from

non-appropriated funds.



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried with-

out dissenting vote, that the amendments to the proposed

policy, as suggested by Mr. Humphrey, be made a part of

the statement.



A suggestion was also made by the Committee to amend certain

wording in the statement and Mr. Humphrey was asked to ob-

tain agreement for this suggested change from DRI.



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried without

dissenting vote that the Committee recommend to the Board

the adoption of the following amended policy statement for

Desert Research Institute:



The Board of Regents of the University of Nevada reaffirms

the following as a statement of policy governing the oper-

ation of the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Uni-

versity of Nevada.



A. Research is recognized as one of the fundamental mis-

sions of Universities. The DRI is an important and

integral part of the University of Nevada and its

continued development is considered a major objective

of the Board of Regents.



B. The DRI act (NRS 396.795) authorizes the Board of Re-

gents to establish policies and procedures exclusively

for DRI non-appropriated monies without reference to

the general requirement of certain State statutes

(Chapter 396 re: University of Nevada, Title 23 re:

public officers and employees and Title 31 re: public

financial administration). The Board of Regents, there-

fore, reaffirms that the following procedures are and

shall be applicable to non-appropriated monies expended

by DRI.



1. All DRI monies shall be deposited with the Treas-

urer of the University and he shall cause appro-

priate funds to be established for proper account-

ing.



2. DRI monies for administration shall be subjected

to the estimative budget procedure.



3. Each DRI project shall be accounted for in conform-

ity with the regulations of the granting agency.



4. NRS 396.795 allows the Board of Regents to estab-

lish professional personnel policies separate

from those applicable to the personnel of other

Colleges and divisions of the University. In-

stitute appointments in general have adhered to

the same salary schedule and personnel regula-

tions as other University appointments, but the

Board recognizes that exceptions sometimes are

required to enable the DRI to compete for out-

standing research talent capable of attracting

outside funds. Such exceptions are made upon

the recommendation of the Director of DRI and

upon the approval of the President.



5. Non-professional personnel of the DRI may be under

the technical service or the State classified serv-

ice, at the discretion of the Director of the DRI.

Special conditions of employment under the tech-

nical service are established with the approval of

the President when necessary to achieve the objec-

tives of the program and to carry out the responsi-

bilities required by grants and contracts. In

particular, this permits compensation for the

temporary nature of employment financed by outside

funds.



6. DRI employees shall follow all State and University

travel laws and regulations except that when trav-

eling on research grant or contract funds it is not

necessary to file an Out-of-State Travel Request

(form VP-F 20). Personnel with joint responsibil-

ity to Academic Deans shall secure from their Dean

appropriate permission to be absent from Campus.



7. DRI purchases may be made in conformity with the

DRI act in either of the following ways:



(a) In conformity with general University purchas-

ing procedures through the Buyer, Office of

the Vice President-Finance, except that the

services of the State Purchasing Division

need not be used unless requested by DRI.



(b) A DRI project principal investigator may, at

his discretion, use a special DRI purchase

order form which clearly informs vendors that

the purchase is made under special University

purchasing regulations and is exempt from the

State Purchasing Act. These forms shall not

be processed through the Buyer nor the State

Purchasing Division but shall clear the Uni-

versity Accounting Office for encumbrance

purposes. The DRI Director may require a

principal investigator to file a memorandum of

justification for such purchases. The Buyer

shall, upon request, furnish information con-

cerning vendors and prices.



8. The DRI shall keep a complete and orderly file on

each established project. This file shall include:



a) A copy of the proposal or application;

b) A copy of the budget;

c) A copy of the contract or agreement;

d) A schedule of all required reports;

e) Copies of all report; and

f) Copies of publications resulting from the

project.



9. All equipment assigned to DRI is and shall be

inventories and subject to the same controls as

all other University equipment.



10. Indirect cost or overhead monies generated by

research projects shall be distributed as follows:

25% to the General University Operation (Fund No.

1), 25% to the Research Emergency and Contingency

Fund, and 50% to the Research Development Fund.

Expenditure of these monies in Funds 15 and 16

shall be subject to the same provisions as other

DRI expenditures of grant funds.



11. It is the policy of most granting agencies and the

DRI that outside support for individual research

in general should not be used to increase the in-

come of principal investigators. Instead such

funds should free appropriated funds for other

uses, such as employing faculty who add new spe-

cialties to the University's teaching and research

resources.



This policy does not prohibit additional compen-

sation for faculty members who elect to engage in

research during their annual vacation month, or,

in the case of faculty on a 10-month contract, dur-

ing their free Summer months.



Research support for small individual projects

characteristically does not provide salary funds

in increments that add up to the equivalent of

full-time positions. Departments usually find it

impossible to hire part-time additions to the

faculty to take over that part of an investigator's

responsibilities which must be set aside to do the

research.



When a proposed research project will impose a

relatively inequitable burden on the investigator,

the President and the Board of Regents are faced

with the choice of foregoing the research oppor-

tunity or permitting compensation to the faculty

member in addition to his basic University con-

tract. When the granting agency permits, it is

at times clearly in the best interests of the

University to accept the condition necessay to

undertake the research. However, this should be

a temporary expedient to help a Department build-

ing research participation to increments of full-

time equivalents. Then it should be possible to

use research project salary funds to release appro-

priated funds for other University uses, including

the employing of additional faculty.



C. Appropriated monies for DRI, in conformity with the DRI

act (NRS 396.795), shall be expended in compliance with

all State laws and University regulations.



Adopted by the Board of Regents

March 27, 1965



President Armstrong discussed with the Committee the Master

List of authorized Professional Positions for 1965-66 as

prepared by the Office of the Vice President-Finance.



The Committee agreed to vote to recommend to the Board ap-

proval of the proposed 1965-66 salaries as amended by the

Committee.



The meeting adjourned at 3:55 P.M.



Action by the Board:



Re: DRI Policy Statement



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Davis, carried

unanimously that DRI statement of policy, as amended,

be approved by the Board.



Re: 1965-66 Salaries for Professional Positions



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Ronzone, car-

ried unanimously that the salary list for professional

positions for 1965-66 be approved as amended by the

Committee.



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Ronzone, car-

ried unanimously that discussion of salary schedules

become a priority item for a future meeting of the

Administrative and Personnel Committee.



It was the consensus of the Board that merit increases

for professional positions should be considered by the

Board before a faculty member is informed that he is

being recommended for a merit increase.



Mr. Hug stated that some concern has been expressed

as to whether a merit increase should be considered

where a faculty member is also receiving a large in-

crease as an adjustment to the new salary scale.



5. Report of Student Affairs Committee Meeting of March 26



Mr. Davis presented the minutes of the Student Affairs

Committee meeting, as follows:



The Student Affairs Committee met in the Travis Lounge on

March 26. Present were Regents Anderson, Davis, Hug, Magee,

Jacobsen, Lombardi and Ronzone; President Armstrong, Vice

President-Finance Humphrey, Dean Basta, Dr. Broten, Dr.

Carrico, Mr. Lawlor, Keith Lee, ASUN President, and Mike

Ingersoll, ASUN President-elect.



The meeting was called to order by Chairman Davis at 4:00

P.M.



1. ASUN Proposal to Change Incollegiate Athletic Allotment



President Armstrong reviewed for the Committee the re-

quest from the ASUN President for the Regents to con-

sider a change in the policy of the allocation of funds

received from the ASUN fee of $17.50 per student per

semester. It was proposed by the Student Senate to

change the $6 allotment presently being made to the

Intercollegiate Athletic Program to $5.50 with the re-

maining 50 cents to go to the University Band. Presi-

dent Armstrong had requested review of the proposal by

Dr. Broten and Mr. Lawlor, Dr. Carrico and Mr. Humphrey

and had invited each of these persons and Mr. Keith

Lee, ASUN President, to attend the meeting to more ful-

ly acquaint the Committee with the problem.



Mr. Lee explained some of the background and the manner

in which the Finance Control Board allocates funds from

the ASUN total budget. He stated that, after further

consideration and discussion with the persons involved,

he would like to withdraw his proposal to cut the

Intercollegiate Athletic Program allocation. He would,

he stated, like to see the $6 allocation remain and the

University Band continue to submit their budget re-

quests to the Finance Control Board.



Dr. Carrico stated that he would not recommend cutting

the athletic program's allocation from their present

$6. He further stated that the University Band would

function on whatever funds could be made available.

He did say, however, that he would like the allocation

to the Band to be a constant amount they could count

on from year to year. He commented that it is very

difficult to schedule a program for the Band, in that

it is often necessary to make their commitments far in

advance, when the amount of funds available for them

may vary from one group of officers to the next.



Mr. Davis commented that the lack of a Marching Band

for the University of Nevada has caused much adverse

criticism throughout the State. Dr. Lombardi stated

that he believed a Marching Band is an asset, quite

often stimulating great interest, and further stated

that perhaps the Board of Regents might consider offer-

ing some assistance. However, it was pointed out that

the Board of Regents do not wish to place themselves

in a position which might encourage the ASUN to cut

back support if they felt the funds would be forth-

coming from other sources. Also, it was pointed out

that the University Band was a student function, just

as the Intercollegiate Athletic Program is, and control

and support of these functions should remain with the

students.



Mr. Lee stated that the students definitely want to re-

tain responsibility for and control of their student

functions and he personally felt that the students must

adopt a policy clearly stating what kind of band they

want and are willing to support; i. e., a 60-group or

90-group marching unit, or a stage band, or a concert

band. Dr. Carrico agreed that control of ASUN funds

should remain with the students themselves and the

Finance Control Board, representing the student body,

should control the allocation of funds, but he reiter-

ated his statement that in the case of the Band it

should be a constant and permanent allotment.



Motion by Mr. Hug, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen, carried

without dissenting vote, that the ASUN, Dr. Carrico

on behalf of the University Band, and Dr. Broten and

Mr. Lawlor on behalf of the Intercollegiate Athletic

Program, be requested to develop a joint plan outlining

what students want and require of these two programs.



2. ASUN Resolution Re: Carillon Bells



President Armstrong presented to the Committee a resolu-

tion recently passed by the ASUN Senate which proposes

that the students, on a voluntary basis, undertake the

purchase of the Carillon Bells at a total cost of $7375.



The resolution had been forwarded to President Armstrong

by Keith Lee, ASUN President, with the request that the

Regents approve the assessment of a special fee of $1

per student per semester for the school year 1965-66 to

finance the purchase of the bells.



At President Armstrong's request, the proposal was re-

viewed by the Office of the Vice President-Finance for

any possible fiscal problems and Mr. Humphrey has

stated that to accomplish the necessary task of col-

lecting the assessment, it will cost approximately $40

to reprint the fee assessment card and $60 to reprogram

the data processing equipment. However, he did not

anticipate any real problem insofar as the accounting

mechanics are concerned. He did point out that it

would require nearly 100% participation for two semes-

ters to pay for the bells, and he recommended that the

ASUN be obligated for any amount not secured by this

optional fee. The ASUN President stated that the

Finance Control Board had appropriated $800 to provide

the necessary down payment if the Board of Regents

approved the purchase of the bells. He stated also

that the ASUN was prepared to assume the obligation

for any amount not provided by the students through

this special fee.



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Ronzone, car-

ried without dissenting vote, that the ASUN resolution

be approved and that the Committee recommend to the

Board the approval of the special assessment.



3. Proposed Loan to Student Union Board



President Armstrong distributed to the Committee the

following letter from Mr. Humphrey concerning a request

from the Student Union Board:



"During the current fiscal year the Jot Travis

Student Union Board Fund has been in difficulty due

to the fact that estimated gate receipts or ticket

sales from various performances have been sub-

stantially less than anticipated and budgeted.

This reflects no discredit on the Student Union

Board in my opinion, it only proves that prefer-

ence in entertainment varies and the enthusiam of

the Board for certain programs was not shared by

large enough number of students, faculty and

townspeople.



"When the extent of this problem was first realized

last December the Student Union Board initiated

numerous economies in order to cut the possible

deficit to the lowest possible figure. A 'Summary

of Receipts and Disbursements, July 1, 1964 to

February 10, 1965, and Projection of Receipts and

Disbursements, February 10 to June 30, 1965' shows

in detail the financial picture. On March 2, 1965,

The Student Union Board voted to request the Board

of Regents to approve a loan not exceeding $10,000

to cover the anticipated deficit in fiscal 1964-65,

such loan to be repaid in full, plus interest by

June 30, 1967.



"Mr. Robert Kersey, Director of the Jot Travis

Student Union, and Dr. Sam Basta, Dean of Student

Affairs, have endorsed the Student Union Board's

request.



"I recommend that:



"1. The Board of Regents authorize a loan of the

amount necessary to cover the Jot Travis

Student Union Board operating deficit for

1964-65, not to exceed $10,000 from the Jot

Travis Student Union Capital Improvement Fund

(1-91-3016) at 3.5% annual interest, at least

1/3 of the principal to be repaid by June 30,

1966 and the balance to be repaid by June 30,

1967.



"2. The Board of Regents agree that from now on

the budget of the Jot Travis Student Union

Board shall not include the expenditure of

anticipated ticket sales or gate receipts

and that such budgets shall anticipate ex-

penditure of only the opening cash balance

and the Student Union fee charged regular

undergraduate students and Summer School

students. This will mean a rather restricted

year in 1965-66 but thereafter each year's

ticket sales will be budgeted the following

year as part of the opening cash balance."



President Armstrong endorsed the recommendations con-

tained in Mr. Humphrey's letter.



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mrs. Magee, carried

without dissenting vote, that the Committee recommend

to the Board the approval of the requested loan to the

Student Union Board under the terms suggested by Mr.

Humphrey.



4. Renewal of ROTC Contract



President Armstrong reviewed for the Committee the cur-

rent ROTC program and the following recent actions per-

taining to the implementation of the ROTC Vitalization

Act of 1964:



a. On March 1, the Academic Standards Committee of the

University Council, by a 7 to 0 vote (with 1 absen-

tion), recommended as follows: "We recommend that

the University of Nevada continue the status quo

with respect to compulsory military, and that a

University Committee be appointed to study all as-

pects of the ROTC program with the objective of

being able to recommend whether military should be

made voluntary." In its report of March 3, this

Committee also indicated that "a study over several

years would probably be required ...".



b. On March 11, the University Council, by overwhelm-

ing voice vote (with only one negative vote) ap-

proved as a "C" action the report of the Academic

Standards Committee. With this vote, the Council

modified the Committee recommendation slightly so

that matters other than "mandatory vs. voluntary"

would be studied. They recommended as follows:

"We recommend that the University of Nevada contin-

ue the status quo with respect to compulsory mili-

tary, and that a University Committee be appointed

to study all aspects of the ROTC program and make

recommendations including the question of whether

ROTC training should be made voluntary." Council

discussion revealed an intent that the study be

made over a period of several years to ascertain

the impact of the ROTC Vitalization Act on our

program. Interim recommendations, however, would

be made on matters such as appropriate academic

credit, advanced placement, credit for Veterans,

and related matters.



President Armstrong continued by saying that the Depart-

ment of the Army wishes the new ROTC contract to be

signed and forwarded to the Pentagon for countersigna-

ture by the Secretary of the Army not later than April

1, 1965. Therefore, the following recommendations were

presented for consideration by the Committee:



a. Approve retention of the present 4-year program

(Basic Course - Required, and Advanced Course -

Elective and Selective) and add the "2-year option"

enabling Junior College graduates and transfer stu-

dents to enter the Advanced Course after attending

a special Basic Course Summer Camp between their

Sophomore and Junior years.



b. Establish by University policy that the Basic Course

be required of all male students. This maintains

the "status quo" by action of the Board of Regents

rather than as a contractual agreement between the

University and the Army.



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Ronzone, carried

with Mr. Hug abstaining, that the Committee recommend

to the Board the approval of the above recommendations

and authorize the President to sign the new contract

for the ROTC program.



The meeting adjourned at 5:10 P.M.



Action of the Board:



Item #1 Motion by Mr. Hug, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen, car-

ried unanimously that the action of the Committee

become the action of the Board. Mr. Hug stated

that in so moving he considered it extremely

important that the University of Nevada have a

Marching Band, for student morale and University

image.



Item #2 Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Dr. Lombardi,

carried unanimously that the Committee's recom-

mendation be approved.



Item #3 Motion by Mrs. Magee, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen,

carried unanimously that the action of the Commit-

tee become the action of the Board.



Item #4 Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Ronzone,

carried unanimously that the action of the Commit-

tee become the action of the Board.



6. Report of Honorary Degrees Committee Meeting of March 26



Mrs. Magee reported to the Board the following recommenda-

tions made by the Honorary Degree Committee after careful

screening of all those persons nominated for Honorary De-

grees or Distinguished Nevadan awards. She added that each

of these persons recommended had received unanimous approval

of the members of the Committee:



Recommended for Honorary Degree:



Mr. Morris Hadley, LL. D. (to be presented at Reno)

Las Vegas Speaker (not yet named - to be presented at

NSU)

Dr. Robert Heizer, D. Sc. (to be presented at Reno)



Recommended for Distinguished Nevadan Award:



Archie C. Grant (to be presented at NSU)

Jean Mc Elrath (to be presented at Reno)

Mrs. Robert Ziemer Hawkins (to be presented at Reno)



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Ronzone, carried

unanimously that the above recommendations of the Honorary

Degrees Committee be approved by the Board.



It was further agreed by consensus that the 3rd and 4th

choice for speaker for Nevada Southern Commencement would

be Dr. Malcolm Love and Dr. William Wood (the 1st and 2nd

choice already established as Adlai Stevenson and Secretary

of the Interior Stewart Udall).



7. Report of the Plant and Property Committee Meeting, March 26



Mr. Jacobsen presented minutes of the Plant and Property

Committee meeting, as follows:



The Plant and Property Committee met in the Travis Lounge

of the Student Union on March 26, 1965. Present were Re-

gents Anderson, Hug, Jacobsen, Lombardi, Magee and Ronzone;

President Armstrong, Vice President-Finance Humphrey, Engi-

neer Rogers, and Mr. William Hancock of the State Planning

Board.



The meeting was called to order by Chairman Jacobsen at

5:15 P.M.



1. Report on Bid Opening, Radiological Laboratory Project

March 22, 1965



Mr. Rogers presented the following report on the bid

opening for the Radiological Laboratory project:



"A meeting to open bids was held in the Audio-Visual

Classroom, Library building, Nevada Southern University

Campus at 2:00 P.M., Monday, March 22, 1965. Present

were: Assistant Business Manager Herman Westfall, Uni-

versity Engineer James D. Rogers, Mr. Mc Bride and Mr.

Eckrich of the Radiological Health Research Activity,

Architect Gerald Moffitt and members of the bidding

firms. Bid notice had duly appeared in a local paper

for the CONSTRUCTION OF A RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH RESEARCH

COMPLEX for the Public Health Service at the University

of Nevada, Southern Regional Division.



"Mr. Rogers opened the bids. A separate tabulation is

listed on page 350 (following motion) showing the re-

sults of the bids as submitted by six contracting con-

cerns.



"It is recommended that the base bid of J. A. Tiberti

Construction Company, Inc., in the amount of $1,576,000

be accepted and that a contract be drawn to accomplish

this work. This bid is within the estimate prepared

by the architectural firm of Moffitt and Hendricks.

Funds will be contingent upon the acceptance of the

Board of Regents of a bid for the University of Nevada,

Nevada Southern Science Building Revenue Certificates,

Series, April 1, 1965."



/s/ James D. Rogers

University Engineer



Approved:

Neil D. Humphrey Charles J. Armstrong

Vice President-Finance President



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried

without dissenting vote that the bid of J. A. Tiberti

Construction Company, Inc. be accepted with awarding

of contract contingent upon availability of funds from

the bond issue.



BID RECAPITULATION AND RESULT SHEET

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH RESEARCH COMPLEX

NEVADA SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY



BID OPENING: MARCH 22, 1965, AUDIO-VISUAL CLASSROOM,

LIBRARY BUILDING, 4505 MARYLAND PARKWAY



CONTRACTOR ALT #1 ALT #2 ALT #3



Tiberti $1,576,000 $21,800 $10,000 $38,000

N. J. Helgeson 1,594,000 10,000 10,000 32,000

Sierra Const. 1,596,000 16,500 9,000 38,000

T. K. G. Const. 1,642,000 23,000 10,000 28,500

Sletten Const. 1,709,000 20,000 10,000 38,000

Ben O. Davey 1,773,000 23,000 9,500 35,000



CONTRACTOR ALT #4 ALT #5 ALT #6 ALT #7



Tiberti $ 8,500 $ 1,400 $20,000 $80,000

N. J. Helgeson 8,600 2,200 32,000 62,000

Sierra Const. 8,200 1,350 22,000 62,000

T. K. G. Const. 4,650 1,200 21,000 50,800

Sletten Const. 8,200 2,000 21,000 60,000

Ben O. Davey 7,900 1,700 20,000 57,500



Alternate #1 - Landscaping

Altnerate #2 - Paving

Alternate #3 - Certain Air Conditioning

Alternate #4 - Certain Electrical

Alternate #5 - Certain Plumbing

Alternate #6 - Auditorium

Alternate #7 - Body Counter Room



Each of the six contractors furnished a bid bond in the

amount of 5% of his bid.



2. Report on Bid Opening, DRI Water Resources Building,

March 24, 1965



Mr. Rogers presented the following report on the bid

opening for the DRI Water Resources building:



"A meeting to open bids was held in Room 202, Morrill

Hall, 2:00 P.M., Wednesday, March 24. Present were:

Assistant Business Manager Hattori, University Engi-

neer Rogers, Assistant Director, DRI, Orlen, Archi-

tect Hellmann, and members of bidding firms. Bid

notices had duly appeared in a local paper for the

construction of the WATER RESOURCES BUILDING FOR THE

DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE, University of Nevada, Reno,

Nevada.



"Bids were received and opened by Mr. Rogers. A

separate tabulation is listing on page 352 (following

motion) showing the results of the bids as submitted

by eight contracting concerns.



"It is recommended that the bid of Meiser Enterprises

in the amount of $366,800 be accepted and that a con-

tract be drawn to accomplish this work.



"The funds to design, construct, furnish and equip

this project were pledged by the Fleischmann Founda-

tion; $300,000 has been requested and received;

$200,000 has not been received, but at least $95,000

of that amount must be requested to accomplish the

construction."



/s/ James D. Rogers

University Engineer



Approved:

Neil D. Humphrey Charles J. Armstrong

Vice President-Finance President



For the information of the Committee, President Arm-

strong read the following letter from Mr. Orlen of

DRI:



"In order to proceed with a construction contract on

the new DRI building based on the low bid of $366,000,

Jim Rogers informs me that the amount of about $95,000

is required in addition to the funds now available in

the DRI facilities building account, 1-91-3015.



"I have discussed this with Professor Mordy and he

informs me that the initial arrangements with the

Fleischmann Foundation provide a total of $500,000

to provide DRI with a building and equipment. He

is prepared to reduce the amount allocated to equip-

ment in order to ensure that funds are available to

proceed with this construction without delay."



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried

without dissenting vote that the bid of Meiser Enter-

prises be accepted.



BID RECAPITULATION AND RESULT SHEET

WATER RESOURCES BUILDING FOR THE

DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE



BID OPENING: MARCH 24, 1965, 2:00 P.M., MORRILL HALL,

ROOM 202



CONTRACTOR ALT #A ALT #B



Meiser Enterprises $366,800 $ 3,850 $ 2,000

Savini Const. Co. 368,900 4,570 2,000

Brunzell Const. Co. 371,728 4,477 1,870

Capriotti-Lemon & Assoc. 371,792 4,600 2,586

E. W. Hahn Const. Co. 374,452 3,848 1,750

Walker Boudwin Const. Co. 384,875 4,577 2,209

A-Dee Const. Co. 388,300 4,600 2,000

Leonard Smith Const. 409,000 4,570 2,220



CONTRACTOR ALT #C ALT #D ALT #E



Meiser Enterprises $16,500 $ 1,180 $ 1,000

Savini Const. Co. 16,488 1,100 1,000

Brunzell Const. Co. 16,488 1,181 1,000

Capriotti-Lemon & Assoc. 16,470 1,180 1,000

E. W. Hahn Const. Co. 16,488 1,181 1,000

Walker Boudwin Const. Co. 18,000 1,600 1,000

A-Dee Const. Co. 18,000 2,600 3,300

Leonard Smith Const. 16,400 2,100 1,000



CONTRACTOR ALT #F



Meiser Enterprises $ 550

Savini Const. Co. 550

Brunzell Const. Co. 550

Capriotti-Lemon & Assoc. 550

E. W. Hahn Const. Co. 550

Walker Boudwin Const. Co. 550

A-Dee Const. Co. 800

Leonard Smith Const. 550



Alternate #A - Ceiling Tile

Altnerate #B - Paving

Alternate #C - Chiller

Alternate #D - Trench Piping

Alternate #E - A, B & C Fixtures

Alternate #F - L Fixtures



Each of the eight contractors furnished a bid bond in

the amount of 5% of his bid.



3. Selection of Architect for Nevada Southern University

Library



Mr. Rogers reviewed for the Committee the present

structure which houses the Nevada Southern University

Library. This structure was originally designed by

Mr. James B. Mc Daniel so that two floors could be

added. Mr. Mc Daniel has also accomplished the pre-

planning of the additional floors, with the approval

of the Board of Regents subject to further study of

exterior design and treatment. The Planning Board

staff now requests that the Board of Regents agree

on the selection of Mr. Mc Daniel as the Architect

to be retained to accomplish the addition to the

Library, pending funds.



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried

without dissenting vote that the Committee agree to

the selection of Mr. Mc Daniel as the Architect for

the addition to the NSU Library.



4. Selection of Architect to Design the Remodeling of

Mechanics Arts Building for Human Development Labora-

tories



Mr. Rogers stated that Mr. Raymond Hellmann had devel-

oped sketch plans for this project to support applica-

tion for federal support and recommended that Mr.

Hellman be selected to accomplish this design.



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried

without dissenting vote that the Committee recommend

that Mr. Hellmann be selected to design the remodel-

ing of the Mechanics Arts building for Human Develop-

ment Laboratories.



5. Selection of Names for Buildings



It has been suggested at an earlier meeting that the

Plant and Property Committee consider names for pro-

posed buildings. Building which will require naming

in the near future are the DRI Water Resources build-

ing and the Nevada Southern Dormitory. Although sev-

eral names have been suggested informally, and some

suggestions have been made for specific buildings,

including the suggestion that the Fine Arts Complex

at Nevada Southern, or a building in that Complex,

be named in honor of Dr. James R. Dickinson, it was

suggested that discussion on this item be tabled

until a future meeting.



Motion by Mr. Hug, seconded by Dr. Lombardi, carried

without dissenting vote, that discussion on the nam-

ing of buildings be tabled.



6. Planters and Seats at Jot Travis Student Union Building

East Entrance



Mr. Rogers presented plans for planters and seats to be

placed at the east entrance to the Student Union build-

ing. The Board had earlier authorized funds to accom-

plish this work from Jot Travis Estate residual.



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen, car-

ried with majority vote that the Committee recommend

to the Board that the plans be approved as presented.



7. Walks and Landscaping, Reno Campus



Discussion on the proposed plans for Evans Walk, Social

Science and Physical Science area walks, and landscap-

ing, paving walks and streets, as proposed for the

immediate future, resulted in the following action:



Motion by Mr. Hug, seconded by Dr. Lombardi, carried

without dissenting vote, that further discussion be

deferred pending study of surface textures of paving

materials.



8. Bureau of Land Management Withdrawals for University

Use



Mr. Rogers presented maps showing land upon which a

hold has been requested of the Bureau of Land Manage-

ment. These areas, all located in the Southern Nevada

area, have been selected by the Administration because

of their potential value to the University in its long

range plans for acquisition of property for future

expansion or development.



9. Radiological Laboratory Project



Mr. Rogers presented plans for the Radiological Labora-

tory Project and pointed out that these plans contain

two "dead end" corridors which are in violation of the

Uniform Building Code. However, Mr. Oliver Placak,

Officer in Charge, Southwestern Radiological Health

Laboratory, requested in a letter dated February 4,

1965 that these corridors remain as designed to satis-

fy their particular security requirements.



Mr. Rogers asked that discussion on this item be de-

layed until the next meeting of the Committee when he

hopes to have additional information.



10. Location of Greenhouse and Environmental Rooms



Mr. Rogers presented plans for two greenhouses, a

headhouse and three environmental rooms which Professor

Mordy has requested be located north and west of the

DRI Water Resources building. These structures will

house Dr. Frits Went's research and will be constructed

from his reasearch grant funds (at a cost of $40,000).

It was pointed out that this area was selected to keep

DRI research in one area and, even though of a tempo-

rary nature, it was recommended that this location be

approved.



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried

without dissenting vote, that the Committee recommend

to the Board that the proposed location for buildings

to house Dr. Went's research be approved.



11. Nuclear Waste Product Disposal Area



At the meeting of the Plant and Property Committee on

February 26, Dr. Dean Fletcher's request for a nuclear

waste product disposal area was discussed and Dr.

Fletcher was requested to investigate more fully sev-

eral areas and submit a report on his findings at the

next meeting of the Committee. The following excerpt

from a letter from Dr. Fletcher to Mr. Rogers was

presented for the Committee's consideration:



"In order for the University of Nevada to obtain a

Broad University Radioisotope License from the Atomic

Energy Commission it is necessary that we have on or

near the Campus an area for radioactive waste disposal.



"The isotopes that are of concern here are isotopes of

uranium which have a half life of 7 x 10 to the 8th

power years ranging down to phosphorus of about 23

days. All of this radioactive material will be in

small amounts that would not be very hazardous but

large enough that they will be safer buried than left

here where they might come in contact with personnel.



"Your suggestion of using an area near the new Univer-

sity Stadium which can be fenced in seems to me to be

the most satisfactory possibility. This would allow

easy access and yet keep it under control on Campus.

Your anticipation that this site will be used some 10

years hence for some other purpose will not present

potential hazard to those uses which you outlined.



"We have considered other possibilities, for example,

use of old well casements in the State Forest Service

Camp north of Reno but found that the casements have

been removed from the holes that had they been left

intact it would be too close to the operating well to

give us the adequate safety margin. So it appears that

our best bet is still the area you have described."



Mr. Rogers indicated on a map of the Campus the pro-

posed area for the radioactive waste disposal.



Motion by Mr. Hug, seconded by Dr. Lombardi, carried

without dissenting vote that the Committee recommend

to the Board that the area as described by Mr. Rogers

be used for a Nuclear Waste Product Disposal Area.



The meeting adjourned at 6:15 P.M.



Action by the Board:



Item #1 Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Ronzone,

carried unanimously by roll call vote that the

action of the Committee become the action of the

Board.



Item #2 Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen,

carried unanimously by roll call vote that the

action of the Committee become the action of the

Board.



Item #3 Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen,

carried unanimously that the action of the Commit-

tee become the action of the Board.



Item #4 Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Dr. Lombardi,

carried unanimously that the action of the Commit-

tee become the action of the Board.



Item #5 No action taken by the Board.



Item #6 The action of the Committee was discussed by the

Board and it was suggested by Mr. Hug that more

consideration be given to the design before final

plans approved.



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Ronzone,

carried unanimously that the matter be referred

back to the Plant and Property Committee for

further study.



Item #7 No action taken by the Board.



Item #8 No action taken by the Board.



Item #9 No action taken by the Board.



Item #10 Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Hug, car-

ried unanimously that the action of the Committee

become the action of the Board.



Item #11 Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen,

carried unanimously that the action of the Commit-

tee become the action of the Board.



8. A meeting of the Plant and Property Committee was scheduled

for 9:00 A.M. on May 7 at Las Vegas, with a tour of the

Logandale Field Laboratory at 11:00 A.M. and a meeting of

the Educational Policies Committee at 2:00 P.M.



9. Bid Openings



An opening of bids for the revenue certificates for the

Radiological Health Laboratory at Nevada Southern had been

advertised for 11:00 A.M. on March 27, 1965. Chairman

Anderson opened the bids and, at his request, President

Armstrong read to the Board the contents of the bids, as

follows:



Proposal for Purchase

UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA - REVENUE CERTIFICATES

Series April 1, 1965



March 27, 1965



Miss Bonnie Smotony, Secretary

Board of Regents

University of Nevada

Reno, Nevada



Dear Madam:



For your $2,000,000 University of Nevada, Southern Science

Building Revenue Certificates, Series April 1, 1965, as

described in the Official Notice of Sale, which by reference

is made a part of this bid, we will pay you

Two Million and no/100 ............................ dollars

($2,000,000) plus accrued interest from April 1, 1965 to

the date of delivery.



The bonds are to bear interest at the following respective

rates per annum for each designated maturity:



Year Amount Rate Year Amount Rate



1967 175,000 3% 1972 205,000 2.90%

1968 180,000 3% 1973 210,000 2.90%

1969 185,000 3% 1974 215,000 2.90%

1970 190,000 3% 1975 220,000 2.90%

1971 195,000 2.80% 1976 225,000 2.90%



As evidence of good faith we enclose herewith a cashier's

check for $50,000 payable to the order of the Treasurer,

University of Nevada.



Respectfully yours,



Gregory and Sons

/s/ Ames H. Sheils



The following computation is not to be considered as part of

the proposal:



Total interest cost from April 1, 1965 $392,185

Less permium or plus discount None



Net interest cost $392,185



Net interest rate 1.91046%



Pursuant to action duly taken by the University of Nevada,

the above proposal is hereby accepted this ____________ day

of March, 1965.



Attest: University of Nevada



_________________ By: ____________________

(Official Signature)



Burrows, Smith & Co.

174 South Main Street Municpal Bond Department

Salt Lake City, Utah 328-1511



To: Honorable Board of Regents Date: March 27, 1965

University of Nevada

Reno, Nevada



Pursuant to your Notice of Sale, which is incorporated here-

in by this reference, we will pay $2,001,500 plus accrued

interest to the date of delivery for $2,000,000 University

of Nevada, Nevada Southern Science Building Revenue Certif-

icates, which bonds are in the denomination of $5000 each

and are to be dated April 1, 1965, with interest payable on

April 1 and October 1 and principal and interest being pay-

able at First National Bank, Reno, Nevada, maturing serially

on April 1, of each of the following years and bearing in-

terest as follows:



Year Amount Rate Year Amount Rate



1967 170,000 3.20 1972 200,000 3.20

1968 180,000 3.20 1973 210,000 3.20

1969 185,000 3.20 1974 215,000 3.20

1970 190,000 3.20 1975 225,000 3.20

1971 195,000 3.20 1976 230,000 3.20



Prior to our accepting delivery of said Securities, you

agree to furnish a certified transcript of all documents

and legal proceedings requisite to their issuance and de-

livery, including the signature and non-litigation certifi-

cate in customary market form, evidencing the legality of

said Securities and the security provisions relating thereto

to the satisfaction of __________________ whose unqualified

approvaling legal opinion will be furnished at your expense

in customary market form shall accompany said Securities at

delivery, and said delivery shall be made to us within a

reasonable period of time.



To evidence our good faith, we enclose our check in the

amount of $50,000. If this offer is accepted, said check

shall be held by you uncashed until delivery of said Secu-

rities, but in the event of a breach by us in the perform-

ance of this contract, said check may be cashed and the

proceeds retained by you as full liquidated damages for

such breach, and the cashing of such check in such event

shall constitute a full release and discharge of all dam-

ages. If said bond attorneys are unable to approve said

Securities, or in the event of a breach of this contract

by you, said check shall be returned to us upon demand.

This bid is made for immediate acceptance or rejection and

if this offer is not accepted, said good faith check shall

be returned to us immediately.



It is mutually understood and agreed that your acceptance

of this offer and the execution thereof by your official

thereunto duly authorized, shall constitute a contract

for the purchase and sale of said Securities.



For information only: Respectfully submitted,



Figures as of: Burrows, Smith & Company

Gross Interest Cost $433,120 & Associates

Less Premium 1,500 By: Nicholas G. Smith

Plus Discount

Net Interest Cost $431,620 Received good faith check

Average Rate 3.188% 3/27/65

/s/ Nicholas G. Smith



Accepted for and on behalf of University of Nevada, pursuant

to authorization by its governing body, and receipt of the

above mentioned check acknowledged, on this 27th day of

March, 1965.



___________________________________________

Official title: Chairman, Board of Regents

University of Nevada



Attest:



__________________________

Official Title: Secretary



After review and consideration of the terms of the bids,

Mr. Humphrey recommended acceptance of the bid of Gregory

and Sons.



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mrs. Magee, carried

unanimously that the bid of Gregory and Sons be accepted.



Opening of bids for the Nye Hall Dormitory Revenue Certifi-

cates had also been advertised for 11:00 A.M. on March 27.

Chairman Anderson opened the only bid received, and at his

request, President Armstrong read the bid letter, as fol-

lows:



Project No. CH-Nev-6(D)

University of Nevada

Reno, Nevada



Board of Regents

University of Nevada

Reno, Nevada



Attention: A. C. Grant, Chairman



Reference is made to the $2,400,000 University of Nevada

Housing Revenue Certificates of 1965, advertised for sale

in the "Bond Buyer".



The Government hereby bids par plus accrued interest at the

rate of three and one-half per centum (3 1/2%) per annum,

for the entire issue, or for any blocks or combination of

blocks of the Bonds as advertised.



The bid is submitted subject to the provisions of the Loan

Agreement dated March 1, 1964, between the University and

the Government, and in particular to the provisions of

Section 3 thereof.



This the 4th day of March, 1965.



Housing and Home Finance Agency

Community Facilities Administration



By Paul Emmert, Regional Director

Community Facilities



Mr. Humphrey recommended acceptance of the bid from HHFA.



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Davis, carried

unanimously that the bid from HHFA be accepted.



A suggestion was received from members of the Board that a

letter be sent to Burrows, Smith and Company, expressing

the Board's pleasure and satisfaction in the Prospectus

prepared for the sale of the Radiological Health Facility

Revenue Certificates.



10. Acceptance of Gifts



President Armstrong recommended acceptance of the following

gifts and grants which had been received by the University:



Library, Reno Campus, from the following donors:



The Honorable Water S. Baring, Washington, D. C. - a copy

of the new "Constitution of the United States of America:

Analysis and Interpretation".



Mr. Russell Benedict, Reno - copies of the first two in-

stallments of the "Tax Exempt Foundations" and Treasury

Department "Report" of February 2, and 8 pamphlets on labor

problems.



Mr. Russell Benedict, Reno - scrapbooks on civil rights in

Nevada.



Mrs. Robert Best, Yerington - $5 for the purchase of books

in memory of Mrs. Robert Kelley.



Mrs. W. H. Bishop, Reno - copy of "World Famous Paintings",

edited by Rockwell Kent.



The Bollingen Foundation, New York, N. Y. - copy of "Notes

on Prosody", by Vladimir Nabokov.



The Honorable Howard Cannon, Washington, D. C. - copies of

the Warren Commission's Report and the revised "Constitu-

tion of the United States of America: Analysis and Inter-

pretation".



Mr. Jack Carver, University of Nevada, Reno - a set of basic

Civil Defense documents.



Mrs. Ruth Collins, Reno - $10 for the purchase of a book on

western history in memory of Mr. Percy Scoville Gardner.



Mrs. Newton H. Crumley, Reno - $10 for the purchase of books

in memory of Richard Margerum, Jr.



Mr. Stanley E. Davis, Reno - 74 books and a number of maga-

zines and pamphlets.



Mr. and Mrs. Fred Dressler, Gardnerville - $10 for the pur-

chase of books in memory of Dr. A. L. Stadherr.



Mr. J. F. Farnesi, Reno - permission to film the Hogan

Scrapbook, borrowed for the purpose by Dr. Fred Anderson.



Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, Michigan - $50 for the pur-

chase of library books in Physics, presented at the request

of Mr. Kim Choy.



Dr. R. C. Fuson, University of Nevada, Reno - copies of two

valuable and important books "The Chemistry of Alkenes", by

Saul Patal, ed., and "The Development of Modern Chemistry".



Mr. Roy A. Hardy, Reno - copies of four books: "American

Bimetallic League Constitution", "Address of the People of

Colorado ... 1893", J. Hamilton Farrar's "The Finance

Question Solved", and "India vs. the Silver Question".



Mr. Howard Herz, Reno - a copy of "Kinder aus Aller Welt".



Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Higgins, Reno - 4 volumes of the "Uni-

versal Dictionary of the English Language", published by

Collier in 1898.



The Honorable Fred T. Homer, Consul-General, Australian

Consultate-General, San Francisco, Califonria - a copy of

the Austrialian published book "Hemisphere", an anthology

on the Pacific and South East Asian areas.



The Honorable Glenn H. Jones, Carson City - a copy of

"Golden Gems in Poems, Prose and Pencil", edited by Daphne

Dale, with an introduction by Rev. W. H. Milburn, published

in 1893.



Dr. Harold Kirkpatrick, University of Nevada, Reno - a 1713

copy of the Treaty of Utrecht for Leslie Byrd Simpson's

"The Writing of History" and "The Despatches of Sir Robert

Sutton", and 9 other books.



Nevada Medical Association - 38 important medical books,

given by Drs. Donald Mohler, Vinton Muller, Fred Anderson,

Roderick Sage, Carl K. Kaufman, Thomas Hood and A. J.

Dingacci, and by Mr. Ray Fleming of Cannan's Drug Store

and Mr. Chester Cochran, and presented by Dr. Anderson

on behalf of the Association.



Mrs. Samuel Platt, Reno - 324 volumes of Mr. Platt's books.



Mr. Ivan Sack, University of Nevada, Reno - permission to

film a rare Maule volume borrowed from the USFS office, and

containing especially his history of the Toiyable National

Forest and the Place-Name File.



Mrs. Tharpe Smith, Beverly Hills, California - $60 to make

cases for a number of fine volumes of Waring's "Masterpieces

of Industrial Art and Sculpture", given to the University

last year in memory of her son William Allen Smith.



Mr. Ross Vroman, Reno - a copy of Fosdick's "The Meaning of

Being a Christian", two Marine Corps reports on Peleliu and

Saipan and a copy of the Marine Corps' "Okinawa, Victory in

the Pacific".



The Worthington Foundation, Harrison, New Jersey - $25 to

the Book Fund for the purchase of books in the field of

Engineering.



Library, Las Vegas Campus, from the following donors:



Mrs. Helen Beckwith, Las Vegas - $5 for the purchase of a

book in memory of Mr. Will Beckley.



Employees of Flamingo Hotel, Las Vegas - $630 for the pur-

chase of books in memory of Mr. Paul W. Lawler.



Foley Brothers, Las Vegas - $10 for the purchase of a book

in memory of Mr. Norman Keller.



Las Vegas Valley Water District, Las Vegas - $25 for the

purchase of books in memory of Mr. George F. Rittenhouse.



Las Vegas Water District Employees, Las Vegas - $10 for

the purchase of a book in memory of Mr. George F. Ritten-

house.



Scholarships and Prizes payments as follows:



American Business Women's Association, Reno - $100 to a

new scholarship award in the name of the organization.



Mr. John Ascuaga, Sparks - $1000 to his scholarship fund,

as second semester stipends for scholars already selected.



Coterie Club, Las Vegas - $131.50 to its scholarship fund.



Lt. Colonel Kenneth E. Day, Tucson, Arizona - $18.75 for

the purchase of a Treasury Bond to be presented to the

outstanding undergraduate member of the University of

Nevada Rifle Team at the Governor's Day Ceremony.



Department of Education, Carson City - $1500 to the Indian

Education Scholarship Fund, for Evans Charley, George Bryan

and Alvin James.



First Western Savings and Loan Association, Las Vegas -

$1149 to its scholarship fund for students at Nevada

Southern.



Las Vegas Press Club, Las Vegas - $1264.15 to its scholar-

ship fund.



Las Vegas Sun, Las Vegas - $500 to its scholarship fund for

awards to Miss Margaret Ashworth and Mr. Mike Sloan in the

amount of $250 each.



Mrs. Warren V. Richardson, Reno - $5000 to the Warren V.

Richardson Memorial Scholarship Fund.



Sunrise Hospital Women's Auxiliary, Las Vegas - $125 to

their scholarship fund.



Nevada Southern Music Concert Series, Las Vegas, from the

following donors:



Alpha Kappa Chapter, Beta Sigma Phi, Las Vegas - $20

Dr. and Mrs. Louis Bernkrant, Las Vegas - $5

Mr. Jack Bushell, Las Vegas - $10

Mrs. Jean Devlyn, Las Vegas - $10

Mrs. Leah Foscarini, Las Vegas - $5

Mr. and Mrs. Sherwin Garside - $25

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest M. Hauswurz, Las Vegas - $10

Mr. and Mrs. Madison Martin, Las Vegas - $20

Mr. Richard Ronzone, Las Vegas - $20

Mr. and Mrs. Eric Schaeffer, Las Vegas - $10



Nevada Southern Art Gallery, Las Vegas Campus, from the

following donors:



Mrs. Arlene C. Belliveau, Las Vegas - $25

Heath Talent Agency, Las Vegas - $25

Dr. and Mrs. K. E. Turner, North Las Vegas - $25



To the Center for Western North American Studies, from the

following donors:



Mr. Russell Benedict, Reno - 11 pamphlets and 3 books on

labor union problems and organization.



Hotel Service Workers, Local #24, Reno - copies of material

relating to the Hotel & Restaurant Employees and Bartenders

International Union, including "Food for Thought" and the

union constitution.



Nevada State AFL-CIO, Reno - saample copies of the union

newsletters.



Miscellaneous Gifts from the following donors:



Mr. Charles Oster, Reno - specimens of silver minerals,

argentite, etc. from the Silver State Consolidated Mine,

Rochester, Nevada, to the Mackay School of Mines.



Vocational Rehabilitation Division of the State of Nevada,

Carson City - $150 toward the purchase of a Precision

Audiometer Calibration Unit for use of the Speech and

Hearing Clinic.



Grants as follows:



The Society of Sigma Xi, New Haven, Connecticut - $450 as

a Grant-in-Aid of Research for the further study of "Geology

and Physical Chemistry of Very Fluid Pliocene Latite Lava

Flows, Sierra Nevada, California", under the direction of

Mr. James B. Koenig of the Mackay School of Mines.



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Ronzone, carried

unanimously that the gifts be accepted and the Secretary

send appropriate notes of thanks to the donors.



11. Personnel Appointments and Recommendations



Personnel appointments and recommendations were presented

by President Armstrong as follows:



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE



Appointments as follows:



Alice C. Gaston, Assistant Research Home Economist for the

period June 1 to June 30, 1965 - $600



Charles F. Speth, Junior Animal Nutritionist, Rank 1, at

a salary rate of $6480 based on twelve months' service,

effective July 1, 1965.



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCE



Appointments as follows:



Gary D. Christiansen, Student Laboratory Assistant (1/4

time) in Chemistry for the academic year 1965-66 at a salary

of $960.



Don Wallace Driggs, Associate Professor of Political Sci-

ence for the academic year 1965-66 at a salary of $10,746.

Dr. Driggs served previously in this Department for the

period September 1, 1956 to June 30, 1961.



Doris Mary Ginsburg, Lecturer in English (revised contract

from 1/2 to full time) for the period March 1 to June 30,

1965 - $2160



William Horton Jacobsen, Jr., Assistant Professor of English

for the academic year 1965-66 at a salary of $8667.



Stanley K. Freiberg, Assistant Professor of English for the

academic year 1965-66 - $8667



Jerald C. Merril, Graduate Assistant in Chemistry for the

academic year 1965-66 - $2300



Michael David Nicklanovich, Graduate Fellow in Biology for

the Spring semester - $1150



Albert G. Sheff, M. D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of

Biology for the Spring semester.



Leaves of Absence as follows:



Carl W. Backman, for academic year 1965-66, without pay,

to accept position as Program Director for Sociology and

Social Psychology with National Science Foundation.



James Roberts for two years, without pay, beginning July 1,

1965, to accept appointment as Deputy Director, Department

of Administration, State of Nevada.



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION



Appointments as follows:



S. Benjamin Prasad, Associate Professor of Management for

the academic year 1965-66 at a salary of $9855.



Edward Allen Zane, Associate Professor of Marketing for the

academic year 1965-66 at a salary of $10,449.



Leave of Absence as follows:



Boyd Fejldsted for academic year 1965-66, without pay, to

complete requirements for Ph. D.



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION



Appointment as follows:



Herbert R. Steffens, Visiting Lecturer in Education for the

Spring semester - $504



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING



Appointment as follows:



Donald L. Clark, Research Graduate Assistant in Civil Engi-

neering for the period February 1 to August 31, 1965 - $2070



GENERAL UNIVERSITY EXTENSION



Appointments in Continuing Education as follows:



Laurence H. Beal, Instructor in Minerals and Rocks for the

period February 9 to April 27, 1965 - $300



Enrico U. Bertalot, Instructor in Spoken French for the

period February 1 to May 27, 1965 - $350



Kathryn H. Duffy, Instructor in Nevada Real Estate Practices

for the period February 1, to May 27, 1965 - $840



Appointments in Evening Division as follwos:



Kinley J. Brauer, Instructor in History for the period

February 10 to May 27, 1965 - $525



Henry Knapp, Instructor in Education for the period February

9 to May 27, 1965 - $525



William K. Macy, Instructor in Individual Voice for the

period February 1 to May 27, 1965 - $120



Glen Mauldin, Instructor in Accounting for the period

February 8 to May 27, 1965 - $700



Larry L. Pippin, Instructor in Political Science for the

period February 10 to May 27, 1965 - $525



Paul L. Ward, Instructor in Secondary Education for the

period February 9 to May 27, 1965 - $525



Appointments for Lake Tahoe Music Camp:



Harold Goddard, Associate Professor for the Lake Tahoe Music

Camp for the period August 16-27, 1965 - $560



W. Keith Macy, Associate Camp Director for Lake Tahoe Music

Camp for the period August 2-14, 1965 - $710



Appointments in Off-Campus Program as follows:



Jon Collins, Instructor in Business Administration for the

period February 1 to May 27, 1965 - $525 (Ely)



Willard F. Day, Lecturer in Education for the period March

5 to May 14, 1965 - $275 (Elko)



Gus Harbin, Instructor in Highway Materials (Technical

Education) for the period February 2-23, 1965 - $672

(Winnemucca)



George M. German, Instructor in English for the period

February 1 to May 26, 1965 - $400 (Fallon)



George Jeffs, Instructor in Education for the period

February 1 to May 27, 1965 - $675 (Caliente)



Charles Knight, Coordinator of Elko Off-Campus Center for

the period February 1 to May 28, 1965 - $300



Donald G. Potter, Instructor in Education for the period

March 5 to May 14, 1965 - $275 (Elko)



Mary L. Rusco, Instructor in Anthropology for the period

February 1 to May 27, 1965 - $600 (Carson City)



Charles D. Sindelar, Instructor in Electronics Mathematics

(Technical Education) for the period October 12, 1964 to

February 22, 1965 - $300 (Ely)



Appointments in Summer School as follows:



Robert L. Armstrong, Assistant Professor of Philosophy for

the period July 26 to September 1, 1965 - $1125



Kinley J. Brauer, Assistant Professor of History for the

period June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $1350



Frank Brown, Assistant Professor of Secondary Education

for the period July 26 to August 13, 1965 - $675



Eleanore Bushnell, Professor of Political Science for the

period June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $1065



Herman Chaloff, Associate Professor of Music for the period

June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $1400



Harry M. Chase, Associate Professor of Political Science for

the period June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $840



Browning Churn, Assistant Professor of Secondary Education

for the period June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $675



Robert E. Collison, Assistant Professor of Mathematics for

the period June 16 to September 1, 1965 - $2250



Rodney V. Connor, Assistant Professor of English for the

period July 26 to September 1, 1965 - $1350



Donald G. Cooney, Associate Professor of Biology for the

period June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $1680



Albin J. Dahl, Assistant Professor of Economics for the

period July 26 to September 1, 1965 - $675



Dana Davis, Assistant Professor of Secondary Education

for the period June 16 to August 13, 1965 - $2250



James C. Davis, Associate Professor of School Administration

for the period June 16 to September 1, 1965 - $3360



Willard F. Day, Associate Professor of Psychology for the

period June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $840



Don W. Driggs, Associate Professor of Political Science

for the period June 15 to September 1, 1965 - $3360



Russell R. Elliott, Professor of History for the period

June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $2130



Alfred Geddes, Professor of Secondary Education for the

period June 15 to July 24, 1965 - $1826



Grant Gifford, Assistant Professor of Elementary Educa-

tion for the period June 16 to September 1, 1965 - $2700



Harold Goddard, Associate Professor of Music for the period

June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $1680



Robert S. Griffin, Professor of Speech, for the period June

16 to July 24, 1965 - $2130



Clifford Hatch, Assistant Professor of Elementary Education

for the period July 26 to August 13, 1965 - $606.80



Felton Hickman, Associate Professor of Music for the period

June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $1680



A. L. Higginbotham, Professor of Journalism for the period

June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $1420



James M. Hoyt, Associate Professor of Accounting for the

period June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $1960



Chester M. Kearney, Associate Professor of Economics for

the period June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $840



Harold L. Kirkpatrick, Assistant Professor of History for

the period July 26 to September 1, 1965 - $1350



Jack Knoll, Assistant Professor of Zoology for the period

June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $1350



Robert J. Laughter, Assistant Professor of Physical Edu-

cation for the period June 16 to September 1, 1965 - $900



William Lutz, Instructor in English for the period June 16

to July 24, 1965 - $510



Paul Macura, Assistant Professor of Russian for the period

June 16 to September 1, 1965 - $2250



W. Keith Macy, Professor of Music for the period June 16 to

July 24, 1965 - $2130



Edna D. Martin, Associate Professor of Elementary Eduction

for the period July 26 to August 13, 1965 - $529.20



Richard C. Mc Clintic, Assistant Professor of Psychology

for the period June 16 to September 1, 1965 - $1800



James C. Mc Cormick, Jr., Assistant Professor of Art for

the period June 16 to September 1, 1965 - $1800



Mary L. Mc Girk, Instructor in Health Education and Physical

Education for the period June 16 to September 1, 1965 -

$1360



Robert Mc Queen, Associate Professor of Psychology for the

period June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $1680



Richard C. Montgomery, Associate Professor of Geography

for the period June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $1570.80



Zada L. Mowrer, Assistant Professor of Physical Education

for the period June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $900



James B. Nickels, Associate Professor of Psychology for

the period July 26 to September 1, 1965 - $1680



Chauncey W. Oakley, Assistant Professor of Mathematics for

the period June 16 to September 1, 1965 - $2475



Willard Z. Park, Professor of Anthropology for the period

June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $1065



Chester F. Pinkerton, Assistant Professor of Mathematics

for the period June 16 to September 1, 1965 - $2025



Alden J. Plumley, Professor of Economics for the period

June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $1065



Alta V. Presson, Associate Professor of Home Economics for

the period June 16-29, 1965 - $442.80



Calvin H. Reed, Professor of Elementary Education for the

period June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $2130



James S. Roberts, Associate Professor of Political Science

for the period June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $1400



Robert T. Roelofs, Associate Professor of Philosophy for

the period June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $1680



Randall Ross, Assistant Professor of Education for the

period June 15 to July 24, 1965 - $450



Ruth I. Russell, Professor of Physical Education for the

period July 26 to September 1, 1965 - $2130



Otto J. Sadovszky, Instructor in German for the period

June 16 to September 1, 1965 - $1700



Wilbur S. Shepperson, Professor of History for the period

July 26 to September 1, 1965 - $2130



Mary E. Shutler, Assistant Professor of Anthropology for

the period July 26 to September 1, 1965 - $1350



Erling R. Skorpen, Assistant Professor of Philosophy for

the period July 26 to September 1, 1965 - $675



Howard V. Starks, Assistant Professor of English for the

period July 26 to September 1, 1965 - $1350



Alfred W. Stoess, Assistant Professor of Management for

the period June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $1350



James L. Tigner, Associate Professor of History for the

period June 16 to September 1, 1965 - $3360



Dirk van der Elst, Instructor in Anthropology for the period

June 16 to September 1, 1965 - $1020



Edward M. Vietti, Associate Professor of Office Administra-

tion for the period June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $1400



Sessions S. Wheeler, Assistant Professor of Geography for

the period June 16 to June 29, 1965 - $450



Hernando J. Woods, Associate Professor of English for the

period June 16 to July 24, 1965 - $1680



Stinson E. Worley, Associate Professor of Elementary Educa-

tion for the period June 16 to September 1, 1965 - $3080



Appointments in Technical Education Program:



Gary W. Campbell, Instructor in Technical Mathematics for

the period March 8-11, 1965 - $24



Michael J. Disanza, Instructor in Technical Mathematics for

the period March 8-11, 1965 - $12



Roy E. Dye, Jr., Instructor in Technical Mathematics for the

period March 8-11, 1965 - $108



Paul Escallier, Instructor in Technical Mathematics for the

period March 8-11, 1965 - $24



Jay Maker, Instructor in Programming for the period March

15 to May 10, 1965 - $300



Ronald D. Parsons, Instructor in Electronic Mathematics

for the period March 10-24, 1965 - $120



Donald W. Samuels, Instructor in Technical Mathematics for

the period March 8-11, 1965 - $24



Harry J. Wolf, Instructor in Electronics Mathematics for

the period March 8 to April 28, 1965 - $600



MACKAY SCHOOL OF MINES



Continuing Appointment as follows:



Walter H. Voskuil, Distinguished Visiting Professor for the

academic year 1965-66 - $3000



NEVADA SOUTHERN



Appointments as follows:



Howard R. Chase, Associate Professor of Music for the aca-

demic year 1965-66 - $8964



Rosemary Masek as Assistant Professor of History for the

academic year 1965-66 at a salary of $7776.



Eugene Wesley Miller, Jr., Lecturer in History for the Fall

semester 1965-66 at a salary of $3443.



Leave of Absence as follows:



Nel E. Jeffers, 2 months beginning July 1, 1965, without

pay, for doctoral study at Claremont Graduate School.



Motion by Mrs. Magee, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen, carried

unanimously that the above appointments be confirmed and

the recommendations be approved.



12. Transfer of Funds



President Armstrong reported the following transfers of

less than $2000 from Contingency Reserve:



#180 $722.60 to Humanities and Fine Arts Division, Nevada

Southern University, to provide funds for wages and

to take advantage of Economic Opportunity Act.



#190 $1500 to Miscellaneous, N. O. C. to assist with

expenses of Committee to select a Dean of Faculty

at Nevada Southern University.



President Armstrong recommended approval of the following

transfers from Contingency Reserve of $2000 or more:



#197 $2501.60 to Buildings and Grounds, Reno to provide

for Landscaping at White Pine Hall and take advantage

of $1431.40 available to the State Planning Board in

an account titled Landscaping, University of Nevada,

Reno.



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried unani-

mously that the above fund transfers be approved.



President Armstrong recommended approval of the following

transfer from estimated salary reserves to the Contingency

Reserve:



Account No. Account Name To Reserve From Resv.



1-01-3005-14 Office of the President 376.10

1-01-3010-11 Exec. Vice President 19,130.31

2-01-4002-14 Registrar, NSU 253.23

1-01-4010-11 Office of Stu. Affairs 80.57

1-01-4010-14 Office of Stu. Affairs 1,227.90

1-01-4031-13 Audio-Visual Comm., Reno 556.31

1-01-4031-14 Audio-Visual Comm., Reno 82.20

1-01-4051-11 Publications & News Serv. 19.88

1-01-4051-13 Publications & News Serv. 108.10

1-01-4051-14 Publications & News Serv. 146.50

1-01-4061-14 Central Off. Servs., Reno 1,518.56

2-01-4062-14 Central Off. Servs., NSU 1,725.70

1-01-4071-14 Data Processing Center 1,180.40

1-02-4130-14 Psychological Serv. Center 324.00



College of Arts and Science



1-01-5101-14 Dean's Office 3.30

1-01-5102-13 Art Department 265.48

1-01-5102-14 Art Department 19.65

1-01-5104-11 Chemistry Department 744.81

1-01-5104-12 Chemistry Department 1,150.00

1-01-5105-11 English Department 248.41

1-01-5105-12 English Department 68.20

1-01-5105-14 English Department 247.00

1-01-51-7-11 Health, P. E. & Rec. 3,831.18

1-01-5107-14 Health, P. E. & Rec. 244.97

1-01-5108-14 History Department 173.90

1-01-5109-14 Journalism 512.00

1-01-5110-14 Mathematics Department 265.65

1-01-5114-11 Physics Department 1,008.94

1-01-5114-14 Physics Department 415.44

1-02-5115-12 Psychology Department 800.00

1-01-5115-14 Psychology Department 836.52

1-01-5117-14 Soc. and Anthropology 267.55

1-01-5119-11 Political Science Dept. 271.18

1-01-5119-14 Political Science Dept. 85.00



College of Business Administration



1-01-5301-14 Dean's Office 205.40

1-01-5303-11 Finance Department 2,100.08

1-01-5304-11 Economics Department 707.96



College of Education



1-01-5401-14 Dean's Office 250.32

1-01-5403-14 General Professional 78.37

1-01-5404-11 School Administration 945.04

1-01-5405-11 Secondary Education 492.24

1-01-5405-14 Secondary Education 69.87



College of Education



1-01-5502-11 Civil Engineering 4.30

1-01-5502-12 Civil Engineering 100.00

1-01-5502-13 Civil Engineering 111.00

1-01-5502-14 Civil Engineering 449.00

1-01-5503-13 Electrical Engineering 2.00

1-01-5503-14 Electrical Engineering 359.50

1-01-5504-11 Mechanical Engineering 53.98

1-01-5504-12 Mechanical Engineering 50.00

1-01-5504-13 Mechanical Engineering 562.00

1-01-5504-14 Mechanical Engineering 372.50



Mackay School of Mines



1-01-5701-14 Dean's Office 412.15

1-01-5702-11 Geology-Geography Dept. 63.80

1-01-5702-12 Geology-Geography Dept. 200.00

1-01-5702-13 Geology-Geography Dept. 53.96

1-01-5703-13 Metallurgy Department 64.03



1-01-5801-11 Orvis School of Nursing 1,178.33



Nevada Southern University



2-01-4003-14 Admissions Office 477.00

2-01-5901-14 Dean's Office 711.80

2-01-5902-11 Bus. Admin. & Economics 750.36

2-01-5903-11 Educ. & Phy. Education 323.28

2-01-5905-11 Humanities and Fine Arts 732.77

2-01-5906-11 Science and Mathematics 1,465.05



Organized Research



1-01-6020-11 Bur. of Bus. & Econ. Res. 708.16

1-01-6020-14 Bur. of Bus. & Econ. Res. 177.95

1-01-6030-14 Bur. of Govt. Research 85.00

1-01-6040-13 Desert Research Institute 959.70

1-01-6050-14 Nevada Bureau of Mines 422.42



Extension and Public Service



1-01-7030-14 Nev. Mining Anal. Lab 1,173.45



Library



1-01-8010-11 Library, Reno 568.55

1-01-8010-13 Library, Reno 4,067.53

1-01-8010-14 Library, Reno 2,718.97

2-01-8050-11 Library, NSU 1,368.00

2-01-8050-13 Library, NSU 276.00



Totals $53,484.18 $10,576.58



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Ronzone, carried

unanimously that the above transfer be approved.



13. Approval of Check Registers



President Armstrong recommended that the Check Registers, as

submitted by Mr. Humphrey, be approved.



Motion by Mr. Ronzone, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried unani-

mously by roll call vote that the Check Registers be ap-

proved.



14. Salary of Annuity Option Agreements



The following letter from Mr. Humphrey, concerning the sal-

ary or annuity option now available to University personnel,

was presented to the Board with President Armstrong's en-

dorsement of the recommendations for amendment of the plan:



The salary or annuity option plan, as approved by the

Board of Regents December 7, 1963, was placed in oper-

ation November, 1964, once the necessary Internal Rev-

enue Service ruling was received. The Board of Regents

resolution (#63-9) specified that the annuity premiums

could not exceed 16.67 percent of the employee's salary.

The Faculty Information Bulletin (#64-31, dated November

19, 1964) specified that the plan was limited to full-

time employees.



I wish to recommend that the Board of Regents amend the

plan to provide that:



1. A salary or annuity option contract be approved for

any professional, technical or classified employee

of the University, regardless of whether or not the

employee is full-time; and



2. A salary or annuity option contract be approved for

any amount up to the maximum allowable by Federal

law and Internal Revenue Service ruling instead of

the maximum of 16.67 percent of salary.



There is a provision in the Internal Revenue Service

regulations for the stated 16.67 percent maximum ex-

clusion allowance to be exceeded on a years of service

formula computed individually for each employee. Usual-

ly only full-time employees will be interested in pur-

chasing annuities and for substantially less than 16.67

percent of their salary. We do have, however, certain

part-time lecturers and other employees who are wives

of business or professional men who wish to take maxi-

mum tax advantage of this option. These changes will

accomplish this and I think it is in the best interest

of the University to accommodate them.



Motion by Mr. Jacobsen, seconded by Mr. Hug, carried unani-

mously that the amendments proposed by Mr. Humphrey and

recommended by President Armstrong be approved.



15. United Student Aid Funds



President Armstrong presented the following recommendation

from Mr. Humphrey, with his endorsement:



Mr. W. E. Rasmussen has been advised by the United

Student Aid Funds, Inc. that only $4,334.24 unused

loan endorsement capacity remains of the $100,000

presently authorized. Mr. Rasmussen recommends de-

posit of an additional $4,000. The current ratio

is 12 1/2 to 1, so this deposit would increase our

loan endorsement capacity to $150,000.



I recommend that the Board of Regents approve deposit

of $4,000 with United Student Aid Fund, Inc. to be

charged to 1-61-5001, the income account of the David

Russell Loan Fund.



Motion by Dr. Lombardi, seconded by Mr. Jacobsen, carried

unanimously that the above recommendation be approved.



16. Bob Laxalt presented to each member of the Board a copy of

the first major publication of the University Press: Dr.

James Hulse's "The Nevada Adventure".



17. The next regular meetings of the Board will be in Las Vegas

on May 8, 1965 and in Reno on June 11, 1965.



18. The meeting adjourned at 11:50 A.M.



Fred M. Anderson, M. D.

Chairman



Bonnie M. Smotony

Secretary

03-27-1965