02/19/1900

 

UCCSN Board of Regents' Meeting Minutes
February 19-20, 1900








02-19-1900

Volume OC - Pages 187-188



Reno, Nevada

February 19, 1900



A special meeting of the Board of Regents was held at their

Office Monday, February 19, 1900, at 8:15 P.M., a full Board

being present.



It was moved, seconded and carried that the report of President

Stubbs at the National Stockmen's Convention held at Fort Worth,

Texas, January 16th to the 19th inclusive, be approved and that

same be printed in pamphlet form for distribution as follows:



NEVADA STATE UNIVERSITY



PRESIDENT'S OFFICE

February 19, 1900



To the Honorable the Board of Regents

of the Nevada State University



Gentlemen:



I submit herewith completed report of work done during my

leave of absence, from January 12th until February 15th.



Under the commission from the Governor of the State I was

present at the National Stockmen's Convention, at Fort

Worth, Texas, from January 16th to the 19th inclusive. At

the afternoon session of the Convention, on the 16th, at

the request of Mr. John Sparks, I made a report upon the

condition of the stock industry in the State of Nevada. I

wish to say in this connection that in preparing this re-

port I could find no reliable statistics either in the State

Land Office or the State Controller's Office. The fault

lies, however, not in the Officers, but in the law which

relates to the gathering of statistics pertaining to the

live stock and agricultural industry of the State. I am in-

debted to the courtesy of Governor Sadler, State Controller

Davis, Surveyor-General Kelley and the Honorable George S.

Nixon of Winnemucca, for the valuable data upon which my

report to the Convention was based.



At the last session of the Convention, on the 19th, I made

an address upon the subject, "What Stockmen of the West and

South Demand of the Federal Government". An abstract of the

paper, prepared before I left the University, was given to

the General Manager of the Associated Press; but during the

week of the Convention I took occasion to revise my paper,

the result of which was the preparation of an entirely new

address. I have a copy of this address as reported by the

stenographer of the Convention, and take pleasure in sub-

mitting the same to the Regents. The daily papers published

very full accounts of the proceedings of the Convention.

Copies of these papers were sent to the members of your

Board, so that you might judge of the value of the work of

this Convention from the standpoint of the interests of our

State. The leading features of the Convention was the de-

bate upon the question of the leasing of the public lands

by the Federal Government. The discussion was very able and

very earnest, and showed that there are difficulties connect-

ed with this question which will require very careful con-

sideration before just legislation can be secured. The

resolution as adopted by the Convention declares that such

of the public lands of the United States as are adapted to

grazing should be subject to lease by stockmen who are citi-

zens, at a reasonable rental, and under such conditions as

shall tend to preserve the grasses from destruction and im-

prove the value of the grasses thereon.



It is not probable that any legislation on the subject of

leasing the public lands will be accomplished at the present

session of Congress. The next meeting of the Convention will

be held at Salt Lake City, Utah, in January, 1901, when this

question will likely come up again for consideration. As

this Convention will be attended by a larger number of the

representative men of Nevada, our State will have an oppor-

tunity to be fully heard upon this subject.



The question of the storage and conservation of flood waters

and of irrigation in the semi-arid states seemed to be the

most important one for the State of Nevada, and it was to

this question that I gave first consideration in my address

before the Convention.



On my way from Fort Worth to Washington I spent one day at

the University of Tennessee, at Knoxville, to make a study

of their Experiment Station work, and in particular, to look

over the plans of the new stock barn, recently built at a

moderate cost, and embracing the improvements of the best

modern stock barns that have been built on several leading

Experiment Station Farms.



I arrived in Washington Sunday morning, January 28th. On

the following Monday I called upon the Secretary of Agri-

culture and received from him the assurance that the Depart-

ment of Agriculture would give all possible aid to the State

of Nevada. I took up, further, with Director A. C. True of

the Office of Experiment Stations, the matter of the appoint-

ment of an Irrigation Engineer for Nevada. As the Regents

are aware, such an appointment has been the subject of con-

siderable correspondence between Director True and the Pres-

ident of the University. It gives me pleasure now to report

to the Board that one of the most experienced Irrigation

Engineers has been selected by the Department of Agriculture

for work in the State of Nevada. This Engineer will become

a member of the staff of the Nevada Agricultural Experiment

Station, and will devote all his time to the study of the

irrigation problems of the State. The salary and expenses

of this Engineer will be paid by the Department. The Uni-

versity will provide office and equipment for the Irrigation

Engineer and give him such assistance as will enable him to

accomplish the best work for the State. Should there be any

demand for instruction in Irrigation Engineering in the Uni-

versity, it can be arranged for without interfering with the

special work of the investigation.



On Tuesday the 30th I arrived in New York and gave careful

study to the Schools of Science and the School of Mining and

Metallurgy at Columbia University. I am indebted to Dean

Hutton of the School of Mines, to Professor Monroe, Professor

of Mining Engineering, to Professor Howe, Professor of Met-

allurgy, and to Dr. James H. Canfield, Librarian, for many

valued courtesies.



I arrived in Boston Friday evening, February 2nd, and re-

mained there until Monday night, February 5th. While in

Boston my time was given to the study of the School of Mines

at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and to the

School of Applied Science at Harvard University. I am in-

debted to Professor Richards of the Institute of Technology

and to Dean Shaler, Professor Marks and Professor Parker of

Harvard University for many and valued favors. One special

object in going to Harvard University was to meet Mr. Peter

Frandsen, a graduate of the Nevada State University, 1895,

a graduate of Harvard University, 1897, and for the past

two years an Assistant in the Department of Zoology, while

pursuing his research work for the Doctor's degree.



I returned to Washington on Tuesday, February 6th, where I

was engaged for several days in work connected with the Amer-

ican Association of Agricultural Colleges and Experiment

Stations.



Leaving Washington on Saturday the 10th, I stopped over two

hours at Baltimore with Doctor and Mrs. W. Mc N. Miller.

Dr. Miller is pursuing research in Pathology and Bacteriology

at Johns Hopkins University and desires a leave of absence

for next year that he may continue his studies in Europe.



I arrived in Chicago Monday, the 12th, met President Harper

of the University of Chicago by appointment, on the subject

of graduate study in Washington -- a subject which is now

under consideration by the Regents of the Smithsonian Insti-

tute, by a special committee from the Association of Agri-

cultural Colleges and Experiment Stations and by a special

committee from the National Educational Association. This is

one of the most important educational movements at the pres-

ent time, and should the work now being done result in open-

ing up the rich treasures of the Departments at Washington to

graduates of the Colleges and Universities of the Country, it

will prove very advantageous to the graduates of our own Uni-

versity. There is to be a meeting of the two committees --

one from the Association of Agricultural Colleges and Exper-

iment Stations and the other from the National Educational

Association -- at the University of Chicago, Monday, February

the 26th. It was my purpose to remain East until after this

important meeting, but the President of the Board of Regents

thought best that I should return home as soon as possible

after the meeting was closed in Washington. Whether I shall

return to this meeting at Chicago depends wholly upon the

judgment of the Board of Regents.



I had a conference with the Adjutant-General of the Army on

the subject of the detail of an Army Officer to this Univer-

sity. The present Commandant, Captain F. M. Linscott, re-

cently of the United States Volunteer Army in the Philippine

Islands, has made an exceptionally fine Officer for the Uni-

versity Cadets. I think it is not too much to say that no

Regular Army Officer hitherto detailed to the service of the

University has done more efficient work for the Military

Department than Captain Linscott. I felt justified, there-

fore, in asking the Adjutant-General if it were possible to

secure an appointment for Captain Linscott, either in the

Volunteer Service or in the Regular Army, with the under-

standing that he whould then be detailed to this University

and placed in charge of the Military Department. The Adju-

tant-General replied that the law would not permit any Of-

ficer to be detailed to the University except a Regular Army

Officer and one who had already had five years of service.

I submit herewith a list of the retired Officers of the Army,

furnished by the War Department, who have signified a desire

to accept detail to College service. You will observe that

in this list some names are checked, which indicates that in

the judgment of the War Department these Officers would be

suitable men in point of character and ability for College

service. Inasmuch as Captain Linscott does not wish to con-

tinue in charge of the Military Department of the University

without an Army appointment, I recommend that the Regents

pass a resolution asking the War Department to detail an

Army Officer for service at this University.



I submit herewith the following nominations, with the recom-

mendations which have been filed in connection with each

name:



I nominate Mr. Peter Frandsen to the position of Assistant

Professor of Zoology and Physiology in the College of Agri-

culture and Mechanic Arts; and to the Department of Zoology

and Bacteriology of the Experiment Station. I recommend

that this appointment take effect July 1st, 1900, and that

the salary shall be $1000 for the first year of service. I

recommend also that Mr. Frandsen be given a leave of absence

for the months of July and August for the purpose of special

duty in the Bureau of Animal Husbandry at Washington. I am

assured by Dr. True that Mr. Frandsen will be given opportun-

ity to make certain special studies that will fit him the

better for his work in our Experiment Station.



Second, I recommend P. Beveridge Kennedy, Ph. D. to be

Associate Professor of Botany and Horticulture in the Uni-

versity and to the Department of Botany and Horticulture in

the Agricultural Experiment Station at a salary of $1500

for the first year. This appointment to take effect the

first day of July, 1900.



I have the honor to remain, gentlemen,



Very respectfully yours



J. E. Stubbs

President



On motion of Regent Deal, seconded by Regent Starrett, the Pres-

ident of the University was requested to ask the Secretary of the

War Department to detail a retired Army Officer for duty at the

University.



President Stubbs placed in nomination Mr. Peter Frandsen to the

position of Assistant Professor of Zoology and Physiology in the

College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, and to the Department

of Zoology and Bacteriology of the Experiment Station, to take

effect July 1, 1900, and that the salary be One Thousand per

annum for the first year of service.



Upon motion, the above nomination of Mr. Frandsen was duly con-

firmed.



President Stubbs also recommended that a leave of absence for

the months of July and August be granted to Mr. Frandsen for the

purpose of special study in the Bureau of Animal Husbandry at

Washington, which was granted.



President Stubbs placed in nomination Dr. P. Beveridge Kennedy

to be Associate Professor of Botany and Horticulture in the

University and to the Department of Botany and Horticulture in

the Agricultural Experiment Station, at a salary of $1500 for the

first year. This appointment to take effect the first day of

July, 1900.



Upon motion, the above nomination of Dr. Kennedy was duly con-

firmed.



No further business appearing, the Board adjourned.



J. N. Evans

President



Geo. H. Taylor

Secretary