01/05/1909

 UCCSN Board of Regents' Meeting Minutes

January 5-6, 1909 







01-05-1909

Volume OD - Pages 73-97



                         Reno, Nevada

                       January 5, 1909



The new Board of Regents met at nine o'clock A.M., Tuesday,

January 5, 1909, in the Regents room at the University.  There

were present C. B. Henderson, John Sunderland, Frank Williams,

A. A. Codd and John J. Sullivan.



The Board organized by electing Mr. John Sunderland Chairman.

There were two names for Secretary - Mr. J. E. Gignoux was nom-

inated by J. J. Sullivan, seconded by Frank Williams.  Mr. George

H. Taylor was placed in nomination for Secretary by Regent C. B.

Henderson, seconded by A. A. Codd.  The vote was taken by ballot.

Mr. Gignoux receiving two votes and Mr. Taylor receiving three

votes, Mr. Taylor was declared elected Secretary of the Board.



The President read his Biennial Report to the Board of Regents

containing his recommendations to the Legislature for appropria-

tions for two years to maintain the University and also relating

to the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.  The

following is the President's report:



                                            December 31, 1908



To the Honorable

    the Board of Regents

        of the University of Nevada

            Reno, Nevada



Gentlemen:



I have the honor to submit herewith my report of the operations

of the University for the two years ending December 31, 1908, and

submitting my recommendations for the two years ending December

31, 1910.



                          ATTENDANCE



The attendance of students for the semester beginning September

4, 1908 is 177 College students and 115 high school students.

These students are classified as follows:



        School of Mines . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 men

        School of Liberal Arts  . . . . . . . .  6 men  51 women

        School of General Science . . . . . . . 10 men   9 women

        School of Agriculture . . . . . . . . .  1 man

        School of Mechanical Engineering  . . . 27 men

        School of Civil Engineering . . . . . .  9 men

        State Normal School . . . . . . . . . .         20 women

            Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 men  80 women



        University High School  . . . . . . . . 43 men  72 women

            Grand Total . . . . . . . . . . . .140 men 152 women



The attendance of University students is very good when the pop-

ulation of the State and the progress of the schools of the State

are taken into consideration.  Nevertheless, we should have today

250 students in the University alone, and the reason that we have

not this many is due to other causes than the ordinary ones that

usually affect College attendance.



                    THE UNIVERSITY'S ADVANCE



The time has now come by the progress of the schools of the State

that the University can make her requirements for admission equal

to those of any other University in the West.  These requirements

substantially represent a four years' course of High School study

for entrance to the University.  This will enable the Academic

Council of the University to distribute the work of the different

Departments in the University in a way that will meet the schol-

arly progress in every Department.  Our ambition is, not alone to

make the Mining School of the highest grade, but to make every

Department of the University so good that it will invite the at-

tention and confidence of the people of this and other States.

The University of Nevada is a small University and it will con-

tinue to be a small University as regards the number of students

that take advantage of its opportunities, but the small Univer-

sity has advantages which must not be overlooked and which will

make its name and its degrees respected everywhere.



While the members of the faculty are aiming in the different

Departments to give these advantages, the State must remember

that it has a duty to perform, that it rests under certain re-

sponsibilities to provide the means for making the Departments

of the University such as they would have them to be.  There-

fore, my estimate of the expenses for the ensuing two years calls

for a much larger amount than the Legislature has been asked to

appropriate heretofore, and some of the improvements to the

grounds and buildings are as necessary to the life of the stu-

dents and the advancement of the work as are the appropriations

for instruction and administration.



                  THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION



The statistics of the Freshman Class of this year show that the

University of Nevada can advance to a four years' requirement

in September, 1909, as readily as to wait until the beginning of

the Fall term in 1910.  For this reason, on the recommendation of

the Academic Council, the President and the Board of Regents have

agreed to the following changes for admission to the Freshman

Class beginning September 1, 1909:



1.  Chemistry and Solid Geometry with 2 1/2 units elective will

    be added to the entrance requirements for the Engineering

    courses.



2.  Ten units elective will be added to the requirements of all

    other courses except the Normal course.



3.  The University High School course will be a four years'

    course beginning September 1, 1909.



4.  The present University High School students belonging to

    the first and second years will be held to this four years'

    course.



5.  Ten units of History will be required for the Liberal Arts

    and General Science courses, as follows:  United States His-

    tory and Civics, five units; either English or Ancient His-

    tory, five units.



6.  Beginning with September 1, 1909, the State Normal School

    (Elementary course) will take two years instead of one as

    heretofore, but the same entrance requirements will, for

    the present, continue.



The Committee of Admission and Advanced Standing will make

arrangements so that all High School students who are deficient

in High School Chemistry shall, for next year, have an oppor-

tunity to make this condition up without impairing their stand-

ing as Freshmen in the University.



                 NEW BUILDINGS AND BETTERMENTS



The following new buildings and improvements are very much need-

ed and the Regents are urged to recommend them to the Legisla-

ture:



1.  A Biological building to cost with its equipment $ 35,000.00



2.  A Greenhouse to cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $  3,000.00

    Maintenance of the Greenhouse for two years  . . $  2,000.00



3.  Building of a dam across the Valley about 200 feet south

    of Hatch Station and parallel to Ninth Street at a cost

    of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $  5,000.00



4.  An addition to Manzanita Hall to cost, with its

    furnishings  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 25,000.00



5.  A Library and Administration building on the present

    site of Morrill Hall, costing complete . . . . . $250,000.00



    The Library is in urgent need of this new building; in a

    year or two the books will overcrowd the present Library.

    We have already had to store part of the books which are

    less frequently used in another building.  The Honorary Board

    of Visitors, appreciating the need of a Library building,

    have recommended to the Legislature to make an appropriation

    for this building.  There is no use putting up a building

    for any less sum than is here mentioned.  Of course this

    building is intended to provide not only for the Library

    and Offices of the Administration, but also lecture rooms

    and seminar rooms for the Departments of History, Latin,

    Greek, Modern Languages, English and Law.  It is possible

    that the Regents will have some hesitation in asking the

    Legislature for this amount, every dollar of which is needed.



    I have tried to lay this building upon the hearts of a few

    friends of the University in the hope that they might see

    their way clear to provide this Library and Administration

    building.  I am not without assurances and hope that someone

    will yet honor himself and the State by providing the means

    to erect this building.  When we remember that the Univer-

    sity of California has received a gift of Six or Seven Hun-

    dred Thousand dollars to be devoted to a Library building --

    that the University of the City of New York received a gift

    of Seven Hundred Thousand dollars from Miss Helen Gould for

    the purpose of a Library building -- it is perhaps not too

    much to expect that some generous friend may be found who

    will lift the burden from the Legislature and give the sum

    of $250,000 for a Library and Administration building.



6.  The Evans Athletic Field was purchased by Mr. Mackay for the

    sum of Three Thousand dollars and has been deeded to the Re-

    gents of the University of Nevada.  We tried to obtain an op-

    tion from Mrs. Evans on the land south of the Evans Field to

    Ninth Street for the University, but she did not wish to dis-

    pose of the land just at present.  She expressed her willing-

    ness, however, to let the University have a sufficient amount

    of land south of the Evans Field where we could place the

    tennis and basketball courts, amounting to 4.58 acres at $500

    per acre, or a total of  . . . . . . . . . . . . $  2,290.00



    A blueprint showing this land, for which we wish the Legisla-

    ture to make an appropriation for its purchase is now on file

    in the Governor's Office.



7.  It would be well if the Legislature would appropriate the

    sum of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $  9,418.70

    to pay for the President's House, which is built upon leased

    ground, and thus make the University the possessor of this

    property which could not now be replaced for less than

    $15,000.



8.  The Central Heating Plant.  The last Legislature appropriated

    Twenty Thousand dollars toward establishing the Central Heat-

    ing Plant, leaving the present Legislature to appropriate

    enough to complete the Plant according to the plans and spec-

    ifications now on file in the Regents Office.  The bid of

    the Nevada Hardware and Supply Company to erect and complete

    the entire plant was $56,721.  The appropriation of $20,000

    was just enough to put in the boiler, pumps, tank for oil,

    mains, manholes, and to install radiation in the Chemistry

    building, the Mackay building and the President's house.

    The Regents were convinced that the heating ought to go in

    to Stewart Hall and Hatch Station and, with the consent of

    the Governor and the other members of the State Board of

    Examiners, they put the radiation in these two buildings at

    a cost of $7,050.49.  The difference between the amount of

    the bid, $56,721.00, to put radiation in all of the build-

    ings, and the amount expended, is $29,670.51.  Therefore,

    the University will need an appropriation, including the

    architect's fees, of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 31,000.00

    to complete the Heating Plant to all the buildings of the

    University.



    Furthermore, the bid for the Training Quarters contemplates

    heating that building from the Central Plant, making connec-

    tion at the manhole just west of the Gymnasium.



          ESTIMATES FOR THE DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION



THE MACKAY SCHOOL OF MINES



    Salary of the Head Professor of Mining and Geology - $10,000



    The Legislature of 1907, through its Committee on University

    Affairs, recommended that an additional Professor with the

    largest amount of experience be secured to take the Headship

    of the Mining School.  The Honorary Board of Visitors in

    their report of July 3, 1908, says, "We approve the recom-

    mendations in the carefully prepared report on the Univer-

    sity made by the Committee on State Institutions at the last

    session of the Legislature, and we especially recommend that

    appropriation be made for salary sufficient to secure a man

    of deep scientific learning, practical experience, and high

    efficiency, capable of making the Mining School one of the

    best, if not the best, in the world."  In accordance, there-

    fore, with this recommendation of the Honorary Board of

    Visitors, I suggest that the Board of Regents ask the Legis-

    lature to appropriate $5000 a year for the salary of the Head

    Professor of Mining and Geology, who shall keep intimately in

    touch with the mining interests of this State.  It might be

    that the State Legislature should assign the duties of a

    State Geologist and State Mining Engineer in addition to the

    direction of the work in the University.



DEPARTMENT OF MINING AND METALLURGY



    Salary of Professor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  $ 4,800.00

    Salary of Assistant in Mining and Metallurgy  . .    1,800.00

    Salary of Assistant in State Analytical Work  . .    1,500.00

                                                       ----------

                                                       $ 8,100.00



    Runway to Metallurgical Laboratory  . . . . . . .  $    50.00

    Steam Drying Oven . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .       50.00

    Laboratory Still  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .       50.00

    To Putting in One Rectifier Panel, Ammeter, Volt-

        meter and Necessary Storage Batteries . . . .      200.00

    Oak Lantern Stand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .       25.00

    Additional Equipment for Mining and Metallurgical

        Laboratories  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      800.00

    For the Purchase of Technical Books . . . . . . .      750.00

    For Floating Stock Laboratory Supplies  . . . . .      250.00

    For the Purchase of New Periodicals . . . . . . .       50.00

    Laboratory Supplies, State Analytical Work  . . .    1,200.00

    Purchases on Museum Account . . . . . . . . . . .      300.00

    Lantern Slides  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      150.00

    Catalog File  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .       75.00

    Desk and Office Furniture . . . . . . . . . . . .      120.00

                                                       ----------

                                                       $ 4,070.00

                                    Total              $12,170.00



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY



    Salary of Professor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  $ 4,800.00

    Salary of Assistant in Museum and in Geology  . .    2,600.00

                                                       ----------

                                                       $ 7,400.00



    Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  $   500.00

    Photograph Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      200.00

    Geological Laboratory Supplies  . . . . . . . . .       50.00

    Charts, Models and Other Supplies for Lectures  .      150.00

    Incidentals, such as Stationery, Labor, etc.  . .      150.00

    Geologisches Centralblatt . . . . . . . . . . . .       20.00

    Filing Cases  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .       60.00

    Desk for Assistant  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .       60.00

    Projection Lantern  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      175.00

    Desk Electric Lamp  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .        5.00

    Electric Motor for Rock Grinding Machines . . . .      125.00

    Two Copper Stands and Three Large Iron Grinding

        Plates for Making Microscopic Slides  . . . .       40.00

    Case for Blowpipe Material  . . . . . . . . . . .       60.00

    Five Lantern Slide Boxes  . . . . . . . . . . . .       15.00

    Wall Case for Chemical Supplies . . . . . . . . .      150.00

                                                       ----------

                                                       $ 1,760.00

                                    Total              $ 9,160.00



    A Typical Geological and Mineralogical Collection  $ 3,000.00



SCHOOL OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING



    Salaries  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  $ 7,500.00

    Repairs on Building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    2,000.00

    Steel Lockers for Shops . . . . . . . . . . . . .      200.00

    Drafting and Mechanical Engineering . . . . . . .    1,000.00

    Shop Supplies and Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . .    1,500.00

                                                       ----------

                                                       $12,200.00



SCHOOL OF CIVIL ENGINEERING



    Salaries  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  $ 4,800.00

    Riehle Testing Machine and Motor Complete . . . .    2,500.00

    Instruments and Furniture . . . . . . . . . . . .      500.00

    Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      500.00

                                                       ----------

                                                       $ 8,300.00



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS



    Salary of Professor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  $ 4,800.00

    Books and Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      200.00

                                                       ----------

                                                       $ 5,000.00



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS



    1.  Salary of Professor . . . . . . . . . . . . .  $ 4,800.00

        Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    1,200.00

        Second Assistant  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      524.00

    2.  Completion of Remodelling of Building for

        University Courses  . . . . . . . . . . . . .      300.00

    3a. Supplies and Equipment for Courses Now in

        Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    1,000.00

     b. Lecture Room Equipment, Now Offered . . . . .    1,500.00

    4.  Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      300.00

    5.  New Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

        a.  Electrical Measurements, Particularly for

            Engineering Students  . . . . . . . . . .    2,500.00

        b.  Elective Courses in General Science . . .      200.00

                                                       ----------

                                                       $12,324.00



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY



    Salary of Professor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  $ 4,800.00

    Salary of Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    1,200.00

    Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      300.00

    Apparatus for Electrolytic Chemistry  . . . . . .      225.00

    Three Becker Balances and Weights . . . . . . . .      205.00

    Repairs to Balances on Hand . . . . . . . . . . .       25.00

    Heavy Acids and General Chemical Reagents . . . .      600.00

    Glassware and General Chemical Apparatus  . . . .      800.00

    65 New Bunsen Burners for Freshman Laboratory . .       50.00

    Demonstration Apparatus for Laboratory  . . . . .      275.00

    Laboratory Repairs  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      275.00

                                                       ----------

                                                       $ 8,755.00



DEPARTMENTS OF AGRICULTURE AND ANIMAL HUSBANDRY, AND OF BOTANY

AND HORTICULTURE



    Teaching and Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  $ 6,000.00



DEPARTMENT OF LATIN



    Salary of Professor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  $ 4,800.00

    Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    1,400.00

                                                       ----------

                                                       $ 6,200.00



DEPARTMENT OF GREEK



    Salary of Professor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  $ 4,800.00



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH



    Salary of Professor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  $ 4,600.00

    Salary of Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    1,700.00

    Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  1,000.00

                                                       ----------

                                                       $ 7,300.00



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY



    Salary of Professor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  $ 4,000.00

    Books, Maps and Apparatus . . . . . . . . . . . .    2,000.00

                                                       ----------

                                                       $ 6,000.00



DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGE



    Salary of Professor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  $ 4,000.00

    Books, Photographs and Table  . . . . . . . . . .      500.00

                                                       ----------

                                                       $ 4,500.00



DEPARTMENT OF DOMESTIC SCIENCE



    Salary of Assistant Professor . . . . . . . . . .  $ 3,000.00

    Books, Equipment and Assistance . . . . . . . . .      500.00

                                                       ----------

                                                       $ 3,500.00



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY



    Salary of Professor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  $ 4,800.00

    Salary of Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    1,200.00

    Anatomical and Physiological Models . . . . . . .      200.00

    Additional Microscopes and Accessories  . . . . .      400.00

    Chemicals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      100.00

    Physiological Apparatus . . . . . . . . . . . . .      300.00

    Botanical Apparatus and Supplies  . . . . . . . .      150.00

    Books on Zoology, Hygiene, Psychology . . . . . .      250.00

    Books on Botany . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      150.00

    Completing Sets of Some Standard Biological

       Periodicals  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      100.00

                                                       ----------

                                                       $ 7,650.00



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS



    Salary of the Commandant  . . . . . . . . . . . .  $   900.00

    Pay of Commissioned Officers for Two Years  . . .      495.00

    Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      400.00

                                                       ----------

                                                       $ 1,795.00



NORMAL SCHOOL



    Salary of Professor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  $ 2,400.00

    Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      100.00

                                                       ----------

                                                       $ 2,500.00



DEPARTMENT OF DRAWING



    Salary of Assistant Professor . . . . . . . . . .  $ 2,400.00

    Supplies  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      200.00

                                                       ----------

                                                       $ 2,600.00



DEPARTMENT OF LIBRARY



    Salary of Librarian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  $ 4,800.00

    Salary of Assistant Librarian . . . . . . . . . .    2,400.00

    Reference Books Selected from Kroeger's Guide . .      428.15

    Books Currently Requested $10 per Month . . . . .      240.00

    Present Periodical List $473.30 x 3 . . . . . . .    1,419.90

    Additional for Technical Periodicals  . . . . . .      240.00

    To Complete 14 Sets of Periodicals  . . . . . . .      745.00

    Books Suggested, 1907-08  . . . . . . . . . . . .      131.00

    Music and Music Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . .       50.00

    Continuation of Murray's Dictionary . . . . . . .       52.00

    Tray Cabinet and Base for Catalog Cards . . . . .      135.00

    2 15-Tray Cabinets with Revolving Base for Shelf

        List  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .       29.00

    Catalog Cards and Shelf List Cards  . . . . . . .       19.25

    U. S. Congressional Library Cards @$5 per Month .      120.00

    Binding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      500.00

    Postage and Expressage  . . . . . . . . . . . . .      180.00

    Incidentals @$6 per Month . . . . . . . . . . . .      144.00

                                                       ----------

                                                       $11,633.30



TRAVELING LIBRARIES



I herewith call the attention of the Regents, and through them,

the Legislature, to a matter of great importance, especially to

the school interests of this State.  There is not any one thing

that will do so much toward improving the work of the public

schools as to secure for the schools and the homes which they

represent access to the best books that are published in History,

in Biography, in Science, in Literature, in Poetry, in Fiction.

I heartily support Mr. J. D. Layman, Librarian of the University

of Nevada, in the recommendation that he has made concerning

traveling libraries in this State, and I hope to see it put into

effect within the first 3 months of the year, 1909.  Mr. Layman's

plan is briefly this:  If the State Library will undertake the

work, for which I understand it has ample funds, it is suggested

by Mr. Layman that necessary legislation be given to enable the

State Library to begin this work at an early date.  But if the

State Library does not see its way clear to undertake this work,

the University Library will undertake it, providing the Legisla-

ture will give the University Library $2400 for books and expens-

es and amend Chapter 176, Statutes of 1907, so that the Univer-

sity Library will get 1/2 of any surplus above $5000 remaining in

the State Library Fund, when such fund lapses, for the purpose of

maintaining a State System of traveling libraries.  The following

letter is clear and explicit in regard to the plans for providing

traveling libraries for the schools and the people of the State

of Nevada:



    President Stubbs,

        University of Nevada



    Dear Sir:



    Referring to the matter of general library interests in the

    State of Nevada, which we briefly discussed some days ago, I

    wish to gain your cooperation along the following lines:



    Let us ask the coming Legislature to encourage public li-

    brary growth and the reading of books by placing the duty of

    such encouragement upon some group of officers.  It has usu-

    ally been done by creating a State Public Library Commission

    with an annual appropriation for salaries, traveling expens-

    es, books and incidentals.  In California the State Library

    Trustees have charge of this work, and I think the same thing

    could be done by the Nevada State Library if its officials

    care to undertake the additional duties.



    If the State Library does not take this matter up, I hope

    you will permit the University Library to take up the work

    of providing and circulating traveling libraries, and other-

    wise encouraging public library development in the State.

    To do this we should have $100 per month for books, clerical

    help, cases, fares, postage and expressage, making $2400 for

    the two years.



    If the Legislature should amend Chapter 176 of Statutes of

    1907 so that the last sentence would read:  "On the 31st day

    of December, 1909, and annually thereafter, the State Treas-

    urer shall take from the said Library Fund all monies in

    excess of the sum of $5000, if there be any surplus, and

    transfer 1/2 of such monies to the University of Nevada Fund

    of the State Treasury for maintaining a State System of trav-

    eling libraries and otherwise furthering public library in-

    terests, and the other half to the General State School Fund

    of the State Treasury."



    Thanking you for your interest, I am,



                             Respectfully,

                                 J. D. Layman

                                 Librarian



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL CULTURE



Beginning with September, 1909, we should have two Physical Di-

rectors, one for the young men and one for the young women of

the University.  There should be an appropriation for the sala-

ries of these two Directors of $5000.



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC



With additional facilities the University should make provision

for instruction in Music and, perhaps, some of the kindred arts.

The Honorary Board of Visitors have recommended that we make

ample provision for the special needs of young women in the Uni-

versity.  I recommend to the Regents that they ask the Legisla-

ture to make an initial appropriation to establish this Depart-

ment of $3000.



UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL



    Salaries and Equipment  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  $20,000.00



                            RECAPITULATION



DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION



    THE MACKAY SCHOOL OF MINES  . . . . . . . . . . . $ 10,000.00

    DEPARTMENT OF MINING AND METALLURGY . . . . . . .   12,170.00

    DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY  . . . . . .    9,160.00

    SCHOOL OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING  . . . . . . . .   12,200.00

    SCHOOL OF CIVIL ENGINEERING . . . . . . . . . . .    8,300.00

    DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS . . . . . . . . . . . .    5,000.00

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   12,324.00

    DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY . . . . . . . . . . . . .    8,755.00

    DEPARTMENTS OF AGRICULTURE, ANIMAL HUSBANDRY,

        BOTANY AND HORTICULTURE . . . . . . . . . . .    6,000.00

    DEPARTMENT OF LATIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    6,200.00

    DEPARTMENT OF GREEK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    4,800.00

    DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    7,300.00

    DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    6,000.00

    DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES  . . . . . . . . .    4,500.00

    DEPARTMENT OF DOMESTIC SCIENCE  . . . . . . . . .    3,500.00

    DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    7,650.00

    DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE & TACTICS  . . . .    1,795.00

    NORMAL SCHOOL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    7,350.00

    POLITICAL ECONOMY AND ADVANCED LAW  . . . . . . .    2,500.00

    DEPARTMENT OF DRAWING . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    2,600.00

    LIBRARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   11,633.30

    DEPARTMENTS OF PHYSICAL CULTURE . . . . . . . . .    5,000.00

    DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    3,000.00

    UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL  . . . . . . . . . . . . .   20,000.00

                                                      -----------

                                                      $177,737.30



DEPARTMENT OF BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS



    Water, Gas and Electric Lights  . . . . . . . . . $  3,000.00

    Oil for Heating Plant . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    2,500.00

    Coal  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      500.00

    Wood  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    1,200.00

    Heating Engineer  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    1,800.00

    Repairs on Buildings  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    2,500.00

    Janitor Work and Student Labor  . . . . . . . . .    4,000.00

    Tools, Hose, etc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      500.00

    Two Gardeners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    2,500.00

    Englarging Pipe Lines, etc. . . . . . . . . . . .    1,000.00

                                                      -----------

                                                      $ 19,500.00



DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATION



    Administration  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 12,000.00

    Expenses of Board of Regents  . . . . . . . . . .    2,000.00

    Visting Schools of State and Advertising  . . . .    1,000.00

    President's Expenses of Travel  . . . . . . . . .    1,000.00

    Insurance of All Buildings  . . . . . . . . . . .    4,000.00

    Salary of Superintendent of Buildings & Grounds .    3,600.00

    Salary of Mistress of Manzanita Hall  . . . . . .    1,500.00

                                                      -----------

                                                      $ 25,100.00

                                    Grand Total       $222,337.30



                           RESOURCES



    FROM THE AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE FUND

        FOR THE TWO YEARS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 75,000.00

    FROM THE MACKAY INSTRUCTION FUND  . . . . . . . .   12,000.00

                                                      -----------

                                                      $ 87,000.00



    TO BE APPROPRIATED BY THE LEGISLATURE FOR THE

        YEARS 1909 AND 1910 . . . . . . . . . . . . . $135,337.30



                         STUDENT AID



As the University has increased the amount of work that each stu-

dent has to do, there is less and less opportunity for a student

to work his way through the University by his labor upon the

Campus.  As a rule the University work is intended to take all

of a student's time excepting that which he gives to exercises

and sleep.  Would it not be well for the Regents to ask the

present Legislature to set aside the sum of $5000 for the two

years 1909 and 1910 to be used to help students from the differ-

ent counties in the State who need help and yet cannot get suf-

ficient work to do and at the same time keep up their studies?

If such a sum could be appropriated the young men and young

women applying for aid to the University could have the amount

given them settled by a Faculty Committee on Student Aid.



As soon as possible the University should have a number of per-

manent scholarships to help worthy students.



                    STATE ANALYTICAL WORK



The labor involved in a free analysis of ores, minerals, soil,

water, etc., is very great and is steadily increasing from year

to year as will be seen by the report of Professor Young, under

whose care the ores and minerals are analyzed and reports made

to the prospectors of the State.



I have no report upon the soil and water but I know it would show

that these samples put quite a tax upon the Chemical Laboratory.

We have estimated the expense of the Analytical Laboratory along

with the expenses under the Head of the Department of Mining and

Metallurgy.  The following reports from Professor Young show

the record for the State analytical work from September 1, 1907

to January 1, 1908; and from January 1, 1908 to June 1, 1908:



                September 1, 1907 - January 1, 1908



Locality                  Nbr. of Persons      Nbr. of Specimens



  Acme                          2                     2

  Amadee, Calif.                1                     1

  Atwood                        5                     5

  Aurum                         3                     3

  Austin                        5                     8

  Beatty                        3                     4

  Beowawe                       1                     2

  Boise, Idaho                  1                     1

  Caliente                      1                     1

  Carson City                   1                     2

  Carlin                        1                     1

  Churchill                     1                     1

  Clifton                       4                     4

  Coaldale                      1                     1

  Currie                        2                     2

  Currant                       1                     1

  Deep Hole                     1                     1

  Duckwater                     2                     4

  Dutch Creek                   3                     2

  Dutton                        1                     1

  Dyer                          2                     6

  Elko                          1                     1

  Ely                           1                     1

  Eureka                        2                     3

  Fallon                        2                     2

  Gardnerville                  5                     8

  Golconda                      4                     6

  Goldfield                     6                     7

  Goldyke                       2                     2

  Good Springs                  1                     1

  Hawthorne                     1                     1

  Hazen                         1                     1

  Healdsburg                    1                     1

  Indian Springs                1                     1

  Lakeview                      1                    34

  Las Vegas                     1                     1

  Lander                        2                     6

  Lida                          1                     2

  Los Angeles                   1                     1

  Lovelock                      4                     6

  Luning                        2                     4

  Manhattan                     3                     4

  Madeline                      1                     1

  Mazuma                        1                     1

  Mina                          2                     2

  Mineral Hill                  1                     2

  Mc Dermitt                    1                     5

  Millet                        2                     6

  Milford, Calif.               1                     1

  Moapa                         1                     1

  Palisade                      1                     1

  Pioche                        1                     1

  Reno                         28                    53

  Rhodes                        1                     1

  Rye Patch                     4                     6

  Sandy                         1                     1

  Schurz                        4                     7

  Seven Troughs                 1                     1

  Skelton                       1                     2

  Silver City                   1                     1

  Springdale                    1                     1

  Sparks                        1                     1

  Tippett                       3                     5

  Tonopah                      13                    33

  Tuscarora                     3                     6

  Vernon                        1                     1

  Verdi                         2                     3

  Virginia City                 1                     2

  Wabuska                       2                     2

  Winnemucca                    3                     3

  Wonder                        4                     8

  Yerington                     2                    13

    Total    72               176                   317



                      Determinations:



Gold and Silver ........... 266  Copper ...................... 15

Iron ......................   4  Ferrous Oxide and Alumina ... 25

Lime ......................  14  Magnesia .................... 12

Lead ......................   8  Sulphur .....................  2

Fixed Carbon ..............   5  Volatile Carbon .............  5

Ash .......................   3  Insoluble Residue ...........  9

Moisture ..................   6  Ignition Loss ...............  5

Antimony ..................   1  Zinc ........................  4

Organic ...................   2



            Total Quantitative Determinations ... 386

            Minerals Determined ................. 346

            Rocks Determined ....................  70

              Total Determinations .............. 802



Estimated Expense:



    Labor - four months at $25 ............... $100.00

    Materials ................................   80.00

    Correspondence ...........................   10.00

    Miscellaneous ............................   10.00

        Total ................................ $200.00



                January 1, 1908 - June 1, 1908



Locality                  Nbr. of Persons      Nbr. of Specimens



  Armagosa                      5                    12

  Austin                        5                     7

  Battle Mountain               2                     2

  Beatty                        2                     4

  Berlin                        1                     1

  Bullfrog                      2                     3

  Coaldale                      1                     1

  Crescent                      1                     1

  Cherry Creek                  1                     1

  Coalville                     1                     1

  Copperhill                    2                     5

  Deeth                         1                     1

  Dayton                        2                     2

  Dewey                         1                     2

  Derby                         1                     1

  Delamar                       1                     3

  East Gate                     1                     2

  Eagleville                    1                     1

  Eureka                        1                     2

  Fallon                        3                     8

  Fannell                       1                     1

  Gold Banks                    1                     1

  Gardnerville                  4                     4

  Gold Creek                    2                     2

  Goldyke                       1                     1

  Genoa                         1                     1

  Goldfield                     2                     3

  Hamilton                      1                     1

  Hazen                         1                     1

  Hawthorne                     1                     9

  Hiko                          1                     1

  Hart                          1                     1

  Lovelock                      3                     7

  Lander                        1                     2

  Logan                         2                     2

  Las Vegas                     1                     2

  Manhattan                     1                     2

  Palisade                      3                     3

  Pioche                        2                     2

  Reno                         30                    69

  Rowland                       3                     5

  Romano                        2                     2

  Rawhide                       1                     1

  Redrock                       1                     1

  Stillwater                    1                     1

  Skelton                       2                     3

  Stimler                       1                     1

  Shurz                         2                     2

  Sparks                        4                     4

  Six Mile House                1                     1

  Seven Troughs                 1                    26

  Sodaville                     2                     3

  Tippett                       2                     7

  Tonopah                       2                     7

  Tuscarora                     1                     2

  Unknown                       1                     2

  Wabuska                       1                     5

  Yerington                     2                     8

    Total    58               125                   255



                      Determinations:



Gold and Silver ........... 258  Chemical .................... 61

Minerals .................. 157  Rock ........................ 68

Silica ....................   6  Ferrous Oxide and Alumina ...  4

Iron ......................   3  Zinc ........................  3

Lime ......................   4  Copper ...................... 13

Lead ......................   3  Ignition Loss ...............  4

Moisture ..................   5  Volatile ....................  2

Nickel ....................   1  Organic .....................  4

Sulphur Trioxide ..........   3  Ash .........................  5



              Total Determinations .............. 544



Estimated Expense:



    Labor - five months at $25 ............... $125.00

    Materials ................................   54.00

    Correspondence ...........................   10.00

    Miscellaneous ............................   10.00

        Total ................................ $199.00



               SUMMARY FOR YEAR 1907-1908:



    Total Expense ............................ $399.20

    Total Localities .........................     130

    Total Individuals ........................     301

    Total Samples and Specimens ..............     572

    Total Determinations .....................    1346



             SUMMARY FOR THE LAST FIVE YEARS:



  Year   Est. Expense   Locs.     Indiv.    Samp. Spec.  Deter.



1907-08   $ 399.20       130        301         572       1346

1906-07     375.42       119        319         619       1526

1905-06     201.45        84        235         444        934

1904-05     235.15        80        158         324       1177

1903-04     144.98        63        142         222        962



Totals    $1356.20       476       1163        2181       5945



                      SCIENCE HALL



This is a building which is very much needed and should be de-

voted to the Department of Biology.  We are at present accommo-

dating this Department in inadequate quarters.  We are using

part of Hatch Station for the instruction in Biology, which

should, as soon as possible, have a building constructed with

reference to the needs of this Department.  Such a building with

equipment will cost at least $35,000.



                      A GREENHOUSE



We should have a Greenhouse for the joint use of the University

and the Station and costing, fitted up, not in excess of $3000,

with $2000 for two years' maintenance.



         THE REPORT OF THE HONORARY BOARD OF VISITORS



This report, prepared with a good deal of care, has been submit-

ted to the Governor, and also to the Board of Regents, and the

President of the University.  Passing by the favorable recommen-

dations of this report, I can summarize the principal points

wherein the Board thinks the University can be greatly improved.

They are as follows:



1.  An enlargement and improvement of the course in Domestic

    Science.  In this recommendation we are in thorough accord

    and will give it careful attention.



2.  The Board has emphasized now for two years the necessity of

    giving to the young women of the University all of the advan-

    tages which they can receive either from a girls' College or

    from a State University.  The Board thinks that the curricu-

    lum of this University should look to the training of the

    young women in those subjects and in those manners which per-

    tain to their individual life;  that young women graduates

    from the University, or young women who have attended the

    University for a time, shall have substantial qualities, in-

    tellectually, physically and socially, that shall fit them to

    take any station or adorn any position that young women are

    called upon in life to occupy.  The Regents will enlarge the

    Department of Arts in accordance with the recommendation and

    give opportunities for the study of Music and the study of

    Art in addition to the other subjects of our course of study.



    To give them that grace and culture that the Committee speaks

    of, I think that there should be a teacher, who is more than

    a teacher, to the young women who shall direct their educa-

    tion in calisthenics and in manners as well as in morals.



3.  The recommendation for an advance in the standard of admis-

    sion has been adopted.



4.  The recommendations of the Board of Visitors with respect

    to the Mackay Mining School and the erection of a suitable

    Library building are treated of in another place in this

    report.



     THE CARNEGIE FOUNDATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF TEACHING



The above Foundation was established a few years since by Mr.

Andrew Carnegie with a gift of $10,000,000.  The object of this

Foundation was two-fold; first, to establish a somewhat uniform

standard of admission to Colleges, and, second, to provide re-

tiring allowances for aged and worn out teachers.  In the work

under the first head, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement

of Teaching has been investigating the Colleges and Universities

- north, south, east and west - and has found quite a difference

in the standards of admission indeed; especially in the southern

group of Colleges, the standard was quite low.  The Foundation

has established a minimum of 15 credits, or 4 years of high

school training for admission to the University or College, but

is allowing a minimum of 12 credits for 2 or 3 years, allowing

the Colleges to advance their standard of requirement for admis-

sion to 15 units.



Under the second head, the Carnegie Foundation has provided from

the interest of this $10,000,000 retiring allowances for aged

and worn out teachers, not as a pension, but as a right after

their long service.  Not only does it provide the retiring al-

lowance for the Professor, but it provides 1/2 of the allowance

to the Professor's wife in case of his death.  The payment of

this retiring allowance excludes Universities and Colleges whose

Board of Trustees are made up of members of a particular reli-

gious denomination, and they also excluded State Universities

from the benefits of the retiring allowances upon the theory

that the Professors of State Universities would be provided for

in their old age by the Legislatures of their several States.



At the meeting of the National Association of State Universities

held in Washington in November, 1907, the question was very

carefully considered with regard to giving the benefits of the

retiring allowance to State Universities and the decision of

this Association was that there were insuperable difficulties

in the way of the Legislatures providing retiring allowances for

worn out teachers.  In January of the present year, I attended

an adjourned meeting of the National Association of State Uni-

versities held in Chicago for the purpose of meeting Mr. Henry

S. Pritchett, President of the Carnegie Foundation for the Ad-

vancement of Teaching, and President Charles W. Eliot of Harvard

University, who is the President of the Board of Trustees of the

Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.



President Pritchett and President Eliot met with the National

Association of State Universities in session during one day and

one evening and they were inclined to think that the State Legis-

latures should provide retiring allowances for their aged and

worn out Professors.  The officers and members of the National

Association of State Universities, especially the President,

Charles R. Van Hise, the President of the University of Wiscon-

sin, showed conclusively that we could not expect any assistance

from the State Legislatures for some time to come and proposed

that the benefits of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement

of Teaching be extended to State Universities for a period of 10

years, so as to give the State Universities time to talk the mat-

ter over with their State Legislatures.  President Pritchett and

President Eliot took the arguments under advisement and later

reported them in full to Mr. Carnegie.  The result was that Mr.

Carnegie gave $5,000,000 additional, the income from which was to

be applied for these retiring allowances to aged or worn out Pro-

fessors, or their wives, connected with State Universities.  Mr.

Carnegie made it a condition, however, that the Governor of the

State and the State Legislature should approve their State Uni-

versity receiving the benefits of these retiring allowances.



Briefly the requirements of the Carnegie allowances are these:

65 years is required as the age limit, just as 62 years is re-

quired as the retiring age limit for an Officer in the Army or

Navy.  In some cases, however, the age limit may be put at 60

years, but with a little difference in the amount of the re-

tiring allowance.  When a Professor retires at the age of 65

years, he enters upon the benefit of his retiring allowance as

a matter of right.  He is entitled to $1200 a year plus 1/2 of

the amount exceeding $1200 which he has received as a Professor

during the last 5 years of his Professorship.



               RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS



At a meeting of the Board of Regents of the University of Nevada

on December 4, 1908, the following resolution was unanimously

adopted:



    RESOLVED, that the Board of Regents of the University of

    Nevada appreciate the high purpose of Mr. Andrew Carnegie

    in establishing the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement

    of Teaching.  They see clearly its far-reaching and bene-

    ficient results in advancing the dignity of the teacher's

    office, in protecting the old age of unselfish public

    servants, and in increasing the efficiency and promoting

    the standards in American Colleges and Universities.



    They therefore desire that the University of Nevada shall

    participate in the benefits of the Foundation, and hereby

    make application for the admission of the University of

    Nevada into all the rights and privileges of the Carnegie

    Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.



                         /s/ Oscar J. Smith, Chairman

                             Charles R. Lewers

    George H. Taylor         John Sunderland

    Secretary                J. E. Souchereau

                             Charles B. Henderson

    (SEAL)                       THE BOARD OF REGENTS



   THE APPROVAL OF THE GOVERNOR AND OF THE LEGISLATURE OF NEVADA



The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching requires

the approval of the Legislature by passing a Senate and Assembly

joint concurrent Resolution that they desire that the University

of Nevada shall participate in the benefits of the Foundation.

This Resolution of the Legislature should be forwarded with the

approval of the Governor, under the seal of the State of Nevada

to the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, 576

Fifth Avenue, New York City.



                 RESOLUTION OF THE ACADEMIC COUNCIL

                        UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA

                            RENO, NEVADA



    RESOLVED, that the Academic Council of the University of

    Nevada commend the establishment in the State Universities

    of an endowment that shall provide the members of the

    faculty with an income for that time when, either through

    illness or advance in years, active service is no longer

    possible.  It is the belief of the Academic Council that

    such a provision, by substantially adding to the pay and

    privileges of the University teacher, will bring to him

    not only greater comfort and peace of mind, but greater

    possibilities for service.  It will enable him to equip

    himself more efficientlfy in his work and to center his

    energies upon the tasks that should demand all his atten-

    tion.  The Academic Council recognizes in the system of

    retiring-allowances established by the Carnegie Foundation,

    through the liberality of Andrew Carnegie, an adequate and

    efficient provision.  It requests accordingly, that steps

    be taken to have the University of Nevada included among

    those State Universities whose teachers are recipients of

    these allowances.



                         /s/ Joseph Edward Stubbs, President

                             Robert Lewers, Vice-President

    Maxwell Adams            P. Beveridge Kennedy

    Romanzo Adams            J. D. Layman

    Kate Bardenwerper        Katherine Lewers

    H. P. Boardman           W. B. Mack

    J. E. Church, Jr.        E. Whitney Martin

    Thomas W. Cowgill        Ralph S. Minor

    Laura de Laguna          J. G. Scrugham

    Sanford C. Dinsmore      W. S. Tangier Smith

    S. B. Doten              Henry Thurtell

    Peter Frandsen           Gordon H. True

    Herbert Wynford Hill     Jeanne E. Wier

    H. H. Howe               George J. Young



    Louise M. Sissa

    Secretary



                       THE MACKAY GIFTS



The Mackay School of Mines was finished, furnished and dedicated

on the 10th of June, 1908.  It was almost two years in the build-

ing and it costs approximately $110,000.



During a visit to the University made in the latter part of March

1907, Mr. Mackay said that he would give the University $6000 a

year for five years.  This makes the sum of $30,000.



After the plans had been drawn for preparing the grounds, he

authorized in November, 1907, the fitting up of the quadrangle

at an expense of about $25,000.



The Athletic Field and Training Quarters:  When Mr. Mackay was

here in June he saw that the facilities for athletic sports were

not adequate to the needs of the young men and the young women

and, after conferring with the young men who have had much to

do with athletics, he promised to give them real help toward

getting their grounds in first class order and putting up one

or two buildings which were needed.  For this purpose he has

given about $45,000.



             THE STATUE OF JOHN WILLIAM MACKAY



This is the joint gift to the State of Nevada and to the Univer-

sity of Nevada.



It stands upon its granite pedestal in front of the imposing

Mackay Mining building, which serves as its background and looks

out over the grass-covered and tree-lined quadrangle.  As the

American flags which covered the statue were dropped, revealing

this statue in all of its beauty and simplicity, Mr. Clarence H.

Mackay, addressing the Governor of the State, spoke as follows:



    On behalf of my mother and myself, I wish to express to

    you as the chief executive of this State of Nevada sincere

    appreciation of the honor conferred upon us and the courte-

    sies extended to us.  The designation of this day as a State

    holiday and of my mother, my wife, my friends and myself as

    the guest of a great Commonwealth is a distinction of which

    anyone might well be proud.  But even more highly do I prize

    the privilege accorded us.  When we heard of the proposal

    before the Legislature to erect a statue of my father as a

    type of the hardy pioneers who began to develop the State,

    both my mother and myself felt an instinctive pride which

    might, I think, be considered pardonable.  But we could not

    but feel also that there should be linked with this public

    recognition our own loving, personal tribute.  Hence our

    request that we be permitted to make this presentation to

    the State to which my father owed the beginning of his

    career and the foundation of his fortune and to which we

    are also greatly indebted.  For the granting of that

    privilege, Sir, I return our heartfelt thanks.  Surely

    no better place for this statue could be found than on

    this splendid Campus, with the background which you behold.



    Your Excellency, I have the honor of presenting to the

    State and the University of Nevada this representation in

    bronze of John William Mackay, the miner and pioneer, his

    hand upon the pick and his eyes turned towards Virginia

    City, the scene of his struggles, his early manhood life,

    his hopes, his fears, his first great success.



At its conclusion, Governor Denver S. Dickerson accepted the

statue on behalf of the State in well chosen words and paid a

graceful tribute to the memory of John William Mackay.  He was

followed by Oscar J. Smith, Chairman of the Board of Regents,

who accepted the statue on behalf of the University.  Then

there were brief tributes paid by Senator Francis G. Newlands

and Honorable Sam P. Davis.



The last Legislature passed a joint concurrent Resolution which

shows the esteem and recognition of these valuable gifts by the

people of the State:



    WHEREAS, Clarence H. Mackay and and wife of the City of New

    York and Mrs. John W. Mackay of London, England, have gen-

    erously donated to the State of Nevada a new building for

    the School of Mines of the University of Nevada, accompan-

    ied by a life-sized bronze statue of the late John W. Mackay,

    who in his lifetime was one of Nevada's most distinguished

    citizens, a man of tireless energy, generous heart, and

    honest life; THEREFORE BE IT



    RESOLVED by the Assembly, the Senate concurring, that the

    thanks of the people of the State of Nevada are hereby

    extended to Clarence H. Mackay and wife and Mrs. John W.

    Mackay, for their noble gift to the cause of educating the

    young men of Nevada in the science of Mining, the State's

    paramount industry; BE IT FURTHER



    RESOLVED, that in the selection of Gutzon Borglum, the most

    distinguished sculptor of America, for the performance of

    the work, they have paid a deserved tribute to a native son

    of the Sagebrush State; BE IT FURTHER



    RESOLVED, that the day on which the cornerstone of the School

    of Mines is laid and on the day the statue is unveiled be

    declared a public holiday, and that Clarence H. Mackay,

    family and friends be declared the guests of the State; and

    BE IT FURTHER



    RESOLVED, that the acceptance of the statue by the Governor

    be endorsed by the Legislature.



                DEDICATION OF THE MACKAY SCHOOL OF MINES



Then followed the dedication of the Mackay School of Mines.  In

presenting the building Mr. Clarence H. Mackay spoke as follows:



    Mr. Chairman of the Board of Regents

        and President Stubbs:



    It was the intention of my father during his lifetime to

    put in some permanent and useful form an indication of his

    appreciation of what Nevada had done for him.  Whatever

    credit may be properly due for the erection of this build-

    ing belongs to him.  My mother and myself have only tried

    as best we could to carry out his expressed desire.  In our

    endeavor to that end, we felt that whatever we did should

    be constructive and helpful, and we could think of no token

    more certain to serve that purpose than a School of Mines

    which should afford to young men facilities to acquire train-

    ing and education not accessible to the youthful miners of

    my father's time.  On behalf of my mother and myself, in

    loving memory of my father, I dedicate the Mackay School of

    Mines in the hope that it will facilitate the development of

    Mining Engineering in this great region of mineral treasure

    and that its inauguration may mark the dawn of a new era in

    the history of this University, in whose interest you, Mr.

    President, and your associates have labored so long and so

    faithfully as to richly deserve the great success which, I

    firmly believe, you are bound to achieve.



In reply, Mr. Smith, Chairman of the Board of Regents, accepted

the building in behalf of the Regents and the University.  Mr.

H. F. Norcross followed with an address in behalf of the Alumni

of the University and Professor George J. Young, Professor of

Mining and Metallurgy in the University, spoke also of the great

value to the young men of Nevada which this building would prove

in the future.



                   VISIT OF THE MACKAY PARTY



The Mackay party consisted of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence H. Mackay

and Mr. George Harvey of New York, and the Reverence Charles A.

Ramm of San Francisco.  They arrived on Number One Saturday

morning, June 6th, and Mr. and Mrs. Mackay and Colonel Harvey

left for New York on Wednesday evening, June 10th.  They entered

very heartily into all the exercises and festivities of Commence-

ment Week.



Sunday morning, June 7th, Reverend Charles A. Ramm delivered a

thoughtful and impressive discourse before a very large assembly

in the Gymnasium.



The Commencement Address was delivered by Colonel George Harvey

and was a forceful and illuminating address upon the value of

individual incentive in life as illustrated by the character and

career of John William Mackay.



Every great institution has an ideal toward which it sets its

aspirations and purposes from year to year and from century

to century.  Likewise this University cherishes its ideal.  To

help this University and to cooperative with it is the declared

purpose of Mr. and Mrs. Mackay and his mother.  There are many

Universities in the country that have a right to rejoice in the

steady support and help of friends who have given of their

wealth, now to put up a building, now to establish a professor-

ship, and now to establish scholarships for students.  The

University of California has among its benefactors Mrs. Phoebe

Hearst.  Stanford University enjoys all of the wealth left to

it by the late Senator and Mrs. Stanford.  Harvard University

has so many gifts and givers that it is impossible to enumerate

them and the aggregate amount reaches millions.  The University

of Nevada, with the appropriations from the State and from the

National Government and the gifts of friends which enlarge its

facilities and strengthen its work, seeks to create an atmos-

phere for education in this State similar to that of the smaller

Colleges of the East, such as Amherst, Bowdoin and Williams.



           THE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION SCHOOL AT SPARKS



The University of Nevada has been on the alert to extend its edu-

cational advantages even beyond the University proper and to

that end it has sought in various ways to extend the work of

some of its Departments.  Some years ago it conducted a Mining

School at Virginia City in the interests of the miners, and

while, from the loss of population, the School dwindled to a few

persons, nevertheless, the School has been maintained through

the kindness of the Legislature ever since.  For the past two

years the Mechanical Department of the University has maintained

an Extension School at Sparks and the following report from Pro-

fessor James G. Scrugham, Head of the School of Mechanical Engi-

neering, indicates that it is doing good and indispensable work

with an attendance of 40 to 50 pupils:



    The Sparks Extension School was reopened on Tuesday evening,

    September 15, 1909, under the direction of the Mechanical

    Department.  Courses are given in Arithmetic, Mechanical

    Drawing and Elementary Electricity.  Classes are held on

    Tuesday and Thursday evenings.  41 machinists, helpers and

    apprentices are in attendance.  The School has the support

    of the Machinists' Union.  The Southern Pacific Company

    furnishes the building, heat, lights, and janitor service

    for the School and have recently granted as compensation of

    $200 yearly for two instructors.  While the difficulties of

    conducting a School of this character have not been entirely

    overcome, I believe the results have more than justified

    the time and effort devoted it it.



               THE UNIVERSITY AND THE CITY OF RENO



There is no doubt that the University of Nevada and the City of

Reno are under reciprocal obligations to each other and we cannot

consider the importance of the one without also considering the

interests of the other.



In 1886 the cities of Reno and Carson entered into a contest for

the removal of the University from Elko to the western part of

the State.  This contest was settled in the Legislature in favor

of Reno by a very narrow majority, by Reno agreeing to make cer-

tain financial arrangements to repay Elko, and to secure a suit-

able site in the City of Reno.  When the citizens of this town

made so much effort to remove the University to Reno they pledged

themselves to care for and to foster the growth of this, the

highest institution of learning in this State and the Head of

its common school system.



Since that time the University and the City of Reno have under-

gone great changes.  The University has made rapid progress in

the field of scholarship and in the field of influence through-

out the State.  It has all of the Departments of a State Univer-

sity well maintained and doing first class work.  It has made

notable improvements upon its Campus within the past three years.

It has advanced the standard of admission and advanced the stand-

ard of scholarship qualifications also within the past five

years.  The number of good high schools in the State organized

and now being organized affords the finest promise for the future

of the University.



The University of Nevada put into the channels of local trade for

the year ending June 30, 1908, the following amounts:



    1.  From the Agricultural and Mechanical

        College Fund ................................. $ 30,000

    2.  From the Hatch and Adams Funds ...............   24,000

    3.  From the State Appropriation .................   65,000

    4.  From Fees and Other Student Expenses .........    6,000

    5.  From Mr. Mackay's Gifts ......................  125,000

    6.  From Student Expenditures ....................   62,500



This gives a total of $312,500 which has been spent directly by

the University to the contractors, tradesmen and laborers of

the town of Reno.



Now I ask in a spirit of fairness and justice if the people of

Reno are not under particular obligations to support the Uni-

versity by making a thoroughly moral community in which the

ideals of common life are held up before the young people?

Have they not obligated themselves to make the town a source

of protection and help to the students who seek a good educa-

tion in the University of Nevada?  I do not think that there

are two sides to the question at all.  While our attendance is

pretty good for the first term of this year, we cannot expect

it to be any better as long as the present social conditions

are maintained and maintained by the will of the people.



The following propositions are and can always be maintained by

sound reasoning and social sentiment:



1.  Gambling is an economic evil that cannot be justified by any

    argument whatever.

2.  Gambling is a social evil bringing death, or dishonor, or

    suffering in its train.

3.  Gambling has been driven from every State in the Union ex-

    cepting the State of Nevada.

4.  Gambling is opposed by the legitimate saloon interests of

    the country.



There have been various utterances from men claiming to repre-

sent the interests and the business of brewers and the liquor

dealers the country over, and, almost without exception, these

men say that the legitimate saloon interest is opposed to gam-

bling and to vice of every kind and that they will do all they

can to eradicate this evil.



The following is taken from an address by a gentleman who is the

President of an organization composed of distillers, brewers,

wine-makers, wholesalers and retailers in liquors.  He says,

"The edict has gone forth that saloons must obey the law; that

they must not sell to intoxicated men, nor to habitual drunk-

ards, nor to minors; that they must not exhibit improper pic-

tures, nor connect themselves with gambling resorts; in a word,

that the saloons must not be a nuisance."



Remember that these words are spoken by a man of prominence who

belives in the saloon, but not in the saloon connected with

gambling or vice of any sort.



The University and the University faculty maintain that this

community is under the highest obligations to remove everything

within the City that is inimical to the growth and improvement

of the University that can be shown at the same time as an evil

and not a good; that should not be recognized as a lawful busi-

ness and the influence of which tends to keep students from the

University and good people from settling in this City.  The Uni-

versity is here; it will have to remain here; it is spending

hundreds of thousands of dollars every year to maintain its plant

and to encourage its progress.  The University came here under

the implied agreement on the part of the City that it would do

all that it could to foster and promote the interests of the

University.  No consideration - political, financial, social or

economic - should be permitted to stand in the way of the high-

est progress of this University and this fair City.



                             Respectfully submitted,



                             Joseph Edward Stubbs

                             President



The Regents submitted the following copy of their Biennial

Report:



                   OFFICE OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS

                        UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA

                  Reno, Nevada    December 31, 1908



To His Excellency,

Denver S. Dickerson,

Lieutenant and Acting Governor of the

    State of Nevada



Sir:



The Board of Regents of the University of Nevada, in compliance

with the Law, submits this report for the two years ending Decem-

ber 31, 1908.  For a detailed account of the general physical,

financial and scholastic conditions prevailing at his Institu-

tion and the recommendations for needed support for the two years

ending December 31, 1910, and the financial tables, you are re-

ferred to the report of the President herewith.



Within the past two years the University has made rapid material

improvement in the way of buildings and equipment and has also

made corresponding gains in the Department of Instruction.  On

June 10th of this year Mr. Clarence H. Mackay and his mother

presented for acceptance and dedication the statue of John W.

Mackay and the Mackay Mining building.  We think that there is

no institution in the United States that surpasses the Mackay

Mining building in gracefulness of architecture and in its a-

daption to the needs of the School of Mines and Metallurgy, Ge-

ology and Mineralogy.  With the fitting up of the quadrangle

in front of his building with a lawn, brick walks and trees,

this portion of the Campus has set a standard for beauty and

utility which this State and this University can never fall

below.  We desire to call your attention to the plan of this

quadrangle herewith published and the site of the proposed Li-

brary and Administration building.



                ADMINISTRATION OF UNIVERSITY AFFAIRS



For the first time in the history of the University it has put up

a building and arranged its grounds so that they add very greatly

to the beauty and attractiveness of the Campus.  It is the duty

of those who have the care of the University to make the grounds

a beautiful setting for the buildings both old and new and, now

that the University has got a start in this direction, it rests

with us and with the State Legislature to continue the good work

which has been begun by Mr. Mackay and his mother.



                          PROGRESS



With the beginning of the year 1909 this University will take

advanced steps with regard to its entrance requirements equal to

any College or University in the West.  It will require 16 units

of work for admission to any of its Departments.  The School

interests of this State are going forward very rapidly.  The

number of the High Schools in the State is being multiplied and

within five years we shall see great educational progress made

in Nevada.  The University must not only keep up with this

progress but must keep in advance of it and to this end we be-

speak from the Legislature the approval of all the recommenda-

tions for appropriations made by the President.  The Regents

of the University cordially recommend all of these appropria-

tions as being the least that the University can get away with.



                   APPROPRIATIONS RECOMMENDED



    Department of Instruction .................... $177,737.30

    Department of Buildings and Grounds ..........   19,500.00

    Department of Administration .................   25,100.00

    Completion of Central Heating Plant ..........   31,000.00

    Greenhouse and Maintenance ...................    5,000.00

    Building Dam Across the Valley Below Hatch ...    5,000.00

                             Total ............... $263,337.30



    Resources from the Agricultural and

        Mechanical College Fund for Two Years .... $ 75,000.00

    Mackay Instruction Fund ......................   12,000.00

                             Total ............... $ 87,000.00



    Amount to be Appropriated by the Legislature

        for the Years 1909 and 1910 .............  $176,337.50



                      BUILDINGS



    Biological Building & Equipment .............. $ 35,000.00

    Addition to Manzanita Hall & Furnishings .....   25,000.00

    President's House ............................    9,418.75

    Library and Administration Building on Present

        Site of Morrill Hall .....................  250,000.00

                             Total ............... $319,418.70



                   PURCHASE OF LAND



Mr. Mackay gave $3000 with which to purchase what was known as

the Evans Athletic Field.  This land was not sufficient to pro-

vide room for the running track, the tennis and out-door basket

ball courts, and, therefore, we ask the Legislature to purchase

4.58 acres of land of Mrs. Evans on the south side of the Evans

Field for the sum of ............................. $  2,290.00



             GRANDSTAND AND TRAINING QUARTERS



Mr. Mackay has agreed to give us for the benefit of the student

athletics the sum of $45,000 to be spent upon the football and

baseball field, the track, and the building of a first class

Training Quarters, Grandstand and Colonnade.  We expect to have

this done and ready for dedication by Commencement time.



      CARNEGIE FOUNDATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF TEACHING



The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching now pro-

vides for all Professors who have reached the age of 65 years,

or by reason of ill health must retire at an earlier period that

such persons shall receive a retiring allowance of not less than

$800 per year.  The purpose of these retiring allowances is to

provide a comfortable income when Professors have passed the

limit of active service, and, further, on the side of the Uni-

versities and Colleges, it enables good men to keep their posi-

tions in a University at the small salary which most Univer-

sities pay, because they are sure that they are provided for

in their old age.  Not only so, but the wife who survives her

husband is entitled to receive 1/2 of the retiring allowance

given her husband in his lifetime.  The Carnegie Foundation

required that the University must have the approval of the

State Legislature and of the Governor before it is enrolled on

the list of the Universities entitled to the benefits of its

retiring allowances.  We presume that every State University will

receive the sanction of the State Legislatures and of its Gover-

nor during the present Winter and will be enrolled as an insti-

tution entitled to the benefits of the Carnegie Foundation for

the Advancement of Teaching.



                     SOCIAL CONDITIONS



The Regents feel that the City of Reno especially owes a con-

stantly increasing duty to the University and that it ought by

every means in its power to make of this City a highly moral and

intellectual community, such as will attract people to come here

to educate their children and to create further an atmosphere of

University life such as will attract young people and such as

will give parents confidence in sending their young people to

the University of Nevada.  The City may not now feel its respon-

sibility, but it ought to.



Until such time as Reno reaches the high moral plane for which

its best citizens are striving, we desire to assure the people

of the whole State that a careful oversight is kept upon all our

students by the faculty and that our students are as safe in

all respects as though they were attending schools in their home

towns.  The faculty keeps a close personal touch with the stu-

dents at all times and thus brings to bear an influence for good

that is impossible in the larger Universities.



We recommend that the Legislature take the necessary action to

have the Constitution of our State changed so that the Regents

may be appointed by the Governor, instead of being elected as

the Constitution now provides (Constitution of Nevada, Art. XI,

Sec. 7).  The terms of Office and qualifications of the Regents

to be left to the Legislature, except that the Constitution as

changed should provide that not more than 3/5 of the Board of

Regents shall be of the same political faith as that of the

Governor making appointments.



There are many reasons for the change.  Chief among these it

might be argued that the University should be kept out of poli-

tics to the greatest possible extent, and, that it is hardly

fair to ask men to run for an office on the State ticket in a

State the size of Nevada, where the office pays no salary and

carries no emoluments.



                             Respectfully submitted,



                         /s/ (All the Members of the Board

                              of Regents)



The hour of 10 o'clock having arrived, the Chairman of the Board

of Regents requested the Secretary to read the proposal for bids

for the Training Quarters, Grandstand and Colonnade on the Mackay

Athletic Field as follows:



    Bids will be received for building the Training Quarters upon

    the east side of the Mackay Athletic Field and the Grandstand

    and Colonnade on the west side of the Mackay Field by the Re-

    gents of the University of Nevada according to the plans and

    specifications for these two structures now on file in the

    Regents Office.



    These bids will be opened at 10 o'clock on Tuesday morning,

    January 5, 1909, in the Regents' room at the University of

    Nevada.  The bids may be filed in the Regents Office any

    time prior to the date of opening and awarding the contracts.

    The contractors must bid upon the Training Quarters and upon

    the Grandstand and Colonnade separately and they will be ex-

    pected to file with their bids a certified check for $500 as

    evidence of their good faith.



    The Training Quarters and the Grandstand and Colonnade are

    the gifts of Mr. Clarence H. Mackay to the University of

    Nevada and contractors are expected to give strict attention

    to the plans and specifications requiring first-class work

    to be done.



    If practicable, the Regents of the University want these

    buildings completed by the first of May, 1909.



    The Regents reserve the right to reject any or all bids.



                             Oscar J. Smith

                             Chairman, Board of Regents

                             University of Nevada



                             P. Beveridge Kennedy

                             Chairman Mackay Athletic Field

                                 Fund



The Chairman then instructed the Secretary of the Board to open

and read the bids, which are as follows:



1.  GRANDSTAND AND COLONNADE BUILDINGS



        Clock and Shea, Reno, Nevada ................... $ 9,700

        Charles Kline, Goldfield, Nevada ...............   9,407

        Northwestern Construction Company ..............   9,543

            Add for painting of same ...................     185

            Add for shingle roof of same ...............     150

        Jensen and Mortensen, Reno, Nevada .............   7,925

        A. F. Niedt ....................................   9,450

        W. H. Blalock ..................................   8,175



2.  TRAINING QUARTERS BUILDING



        Clock and Shea, Reno, Nevada ................... $19,487

        Charles Kline, Goldfield, Nevada ...............  24,152

        Northwestern Construction Company, Reno, Nevada.  22,800

        Stockholm and Allyn, San Francisco, California

            for both buildings .........................  39,100

        Walter Wilkie Construction Company, San

            Francisco, California, both buildings ......  28,945

        Ransome Construction Company, San Francisco,

            California, both buildings .................  33,500

        C. A. Holden, Los Angeles, California,

            both buildings complete ....................  43,056



On motion of Regent Henderson, seconded by Regent Codd, the com-

bined bid of Clock and Shea for building the Training Quarters

and the Grandstand and Colonnade for $28,452 was accepted and

approved.



In this bid the roof of the Training Quarters was changed from

shingle to tin; the basement floor is to be of cement; and the

lugs on the Grandstand are to be of iron instead of wood.  It

was understood and agreed that the work on the Grandstand was

to be done by Mr. W. H. Blalock, whose bid was $8175.



Mr. Fairweather, the representative of Bliss and Faville, took

all the information with him to San Francisco for the purpose

of executing a contract with Clock and Shea with a good and

sufficient bond of $3000.



On motion of Regent Codd, seconded by Regent Sullivan, the

Secretary of the Board was instructed to place $10,000 insurance

on the furniture and equipment of the Mackay Mining building with

Welsh and Chadwick of Goldfield, the insurance to take effect

from this date.



On motion the Board of Regents adjourned to meet in their Office

at the University at 9 o'clock A.M., January 30, 1909.



                             John Sunderland

                             Chairman



Geo. H. Taylor

Secretary